Who owns the “Trümmerfrauen”?

Wem gehören die “Trümmerfrauen”?


In late autumn 2018, a debate arose regarding a monument to the Austrian “Trümmerfrauen” (women who cleared away the debris in German and Austrian cities after World War 2), which was ceremonially unveiled on 1 October 2018 by the Austrian Vice-Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache from the right-wing Freedom Party. This discussion could also have taken place 30 years earlier and in fact has, especially in West Germany. The core question of the debate in 2018 was whether the so-called “Trümmerfrauen” deserved a monument at all.

Or: The Age-Old “Victim Myth”

Thanks to various distinct sources, we know that a large proportion of the people who removed rubble and debris from the streets of Austria’s major cities in 1945 were actually former National Socialists who were forced by law to do so.[1] Some historians had already pointed out this fact in the late 1980s and early 1990s and did so again in the aftermath of H.C. Strache’s speech.[2] Not surprisingly however, the Austrian Vice-Chancellor was not deterred by their arguments, and a mere glance at the online forums of major Austrian daily newspapers on this subject reveals that many of their users shared the same image of the innocent “Trümmerfrauen” who were seen as crucial to Austria’s reconstruction.[3]

We Are Victims!

The so-called “Trümmerfrauen” symbolize an Austrian way of dealing with the Nazi era, which—even more than 80 years after Austria’s “Anschluss” to Nazi Germany—is still deeply rooted in the idea that Austria was Hitler’s first victim. While historians have repeatedly deconstructed this “Opfermythos” (“victim myth”) since the 1980s, its effectiveness in parts of society and politics evidently seems to endure. Although it was visibly weakened—at least in the public perception—the “victim myth” remains nevertheless.[4] In this narrative construction of Austria’s past, the “Trümmerfrauen” are allocated different kinds of victim roles themselves. On one hand, together with the whole of Austria, they are seen as victims of Nazi aggression, the consequences of which they were directly exposed to by repairing the damage caused by the war on the streets. At the same time, as women, they are considered to be victims of men in two respects: Firstly, they had to repair the direct damage of a war started by the National Socialist men, and secondly their contribution was at first excluded from the masculine reconstruction narrative.[5]

The history of the Austrian “Trümmerfrauen” therefore began as a counter-narrative of feminist historiography to the common reconstruction narratives which only featured men. But while historians such as Irene Bandhauer-Schöffmann and Ela Hornung had already reminded us at the end of the 1980s that the role of women as perpetrators and accomplices of the Nazi system must also be taken into account, their de-historicized mystification, disengaged from the Nazi era, has apparently continued to this day.[6] The “Trümmerfrauen” served and serve as a cipher for a generation which, after the proverbial “Stunde Null”, rebuilt Austria and was subsequently established as an embodiment of a positive lieu de memoire. This lieu de memoire deliberately ignores the reasons why Austria’s cities were destroyed in the first place.

“Trümmerfrauen”-myth 3.0

The re-actualization of the “Trümmerfrauen”-myth occurs at regular intervals, particularly on the occasion of commemorative years: In 1995, via the exhibition “Frauenleben in Österreich 1945” (Women’s Life in Austria 1945)[7]; in 2005, when the Austrian Federal Government passed a federal law “to establish a one-off grant for women in recognition of their special achievements in the reconstruction of the Republic of Austria”[8]; and finally in 2018, when H.C. Strache’s ceremonially unveiled the aforementioned monument. Why the Austrian Vice-Chancellor has repeatedly expressed himself particularly positively about the “Trümmerfrauen” in public is reason for speculation. It is probable that H.C. Strache was hardly concerned with the votes of the actual generation of the “Trümmerfrauen” — after all, the majority of them are no longer alive.

Instead, this symbolic act and H.C. Strache’s statements concerning the “Trümmerfrauen” may have addressed their children and also their grandchildren, which from a demographic perspective are clearly a more important group of voters. These generations in particular could be susceptible to a renewed “whitewashing” of Austrian history and a reemergence of the “victim myth”.[9] This coincides with various studies from Germany, according to which the younger generations in particular have great difficulty in acknowledging the National Socialist past of their grandparents. Among other things, this could be due to a lack of knowledge about this very past.[10]

Ineffectiveness of History?

For historians, and especially for public historians, this raises the question of how it will be possible to establish compatible counter-narratives and scientific facts about the participation of Austrians in the Nazi state. For even though the “victim thesis” is clearly falsified in Austrian contemporary historical research, it still remains effective in the public sphere. The “double speak”, the postulate of being the first victim of National Socialism while at the same time commemorating the victims of the war against National Socialism as heroes, is typical for the Austrian way of dealing with the Nazi era and seems to have survived in a slightly modified way.[11]

What Is “Proper” Commemoration?

Although the crimes of National Socialism are recognized, they are nonetheless still seen in isolation from the Austrian population. In this understanding, the externalization of National Socialism and therefore its crimes is far from over. While the memory of these crimes is highly institutionalized in remembrance of the Holocaust, it also functions as a purely symbolic lieu de memoire and empty gesture.[12] In 2018, H.C. Strache not only unveiled the “Trümmerfrauen” monument but also spoke at the Viennese commemoration of International Liberation Day in Mauthausen. On both occasions, he used the term “victims”.[13] Independent of whether an event commemorating the Holocaust, to which even the chairman of a right-wing extremist party[14] can align himself, constitutes the right form of remembrance, this position once again implies an equal status of these victim groups and collectively raises the Austrian population collectively — represented by the “Trümmerfrauen” — to the status of victims of National Socialism.[15]

This clearly shows once again that the commemorative debates of the late 20th century are not yet settled and that the Nazi past still is another country – in Austria at least. Whilst right-wing political elites attempt to pay lip service in their condolences for the victims of the Holocaust, there still remains to this day enough elbow room in the public sphere to maneuver around questions about the responsibility of the entire Austrian society at that time or simply deny it. The notion of accepting and admitting a societal guilt or complicity, as well as the consequences that should follow, seems in recent years to have further receded into the far distance.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Uhl, Heidemarie. “Opferthesen, revisited. Österreichs ambivalenter Umgang mit der NS-Vergangenheit. ” Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte 34-35, (2018),  http://www.bpb.de/apuz/274259/oesterreichs-ambivalenter-umgang-mit-der-ns-vergangenheit? (last accessed 17 April 2019).
  • Hammerstein, Katrin. Gemeinsame Vergangenheit – Getrennte Erinnerung? Der Nationalsozialismus in Gedächtnisdiskursen und Identitätskonstruktionen von Bundesrepublik Deutschland, DDR und Österreich. Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2017.
  • Berg, Matthew P. “Arbeitspflicht in Postwar Vienna. Punishing Nazis vs. Expediting Reconstruction 1945-48.History 39 (2006), http://collected.jcu.edu/hist-facpub/39 (last accessed 17 April 2019).

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] At this point I would like to refer to a current research project by Thomas Walach and myself on various holdings of the “Wiener Stadt- und Landesarchivs” about carrying out so-called “Notstandsarbeiten” in Vienna in 1945/1946, the first results of which are expected to be published in autumn 2019. A highly recommendable overview of the obligation to work for former National Socialists can be found in: Matthew P. Berg, “Arbeitspflicht in Postwar Vienna. Punishing Nazis vs. Expediting Reconstruction 1945-48,” History 39, (2006), http://collected.jcu.edu/hist-facpub/39 (last accessed 17 April 2019).
[2] Peter Mayr, “Historikerinnen gegen Wiener Denkmal für Trümmerfrauen, ” Der Standard 1. Oktober 2018, https://derstandard.at/2000088377977/Historikerinnen-gegen-ein-Denkmal-fuer-die-Truemmerfrauen (last accessed 17 April 2019).
[3] “Strache enthüllt Denkmal für Trümmerfrauen, ” Kronen Zeitung, 1. Oktober 2018, https://www.krone.at/1781055 (last accessed 17 April 2019); “Strache enthüllt Denkmal für Trümmerfrauen,” Die Presse, 1. Oktober 2018, https://diepresse.com/home/zeitgeschichte/5505798/Strache-enthuellt-Denkmal-fuer-Truemmerfrauen-in-Wien (last accessed 17 April 2019).
[4] On the development of the “victim myth”, see: Heidemarie Uhl, “Opferthesen, revisited. Österreichs ambivalenter Umgang mit der NS-Vergangenheit,” Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte 34-35, (2018); und “Österreich”, S. 47-54; Katrin Hammerstein, Gemeinsame Vergangenheit – Getrennte Erinnerung? Der Nationalsozialismus in Gedächtnisdiskursen und Identitätskonstruktionen von Bundesrepublik Deutschland, DDR und Österreich (Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2017).
[5] See: Irene Bandhauer-Schöffmann und Ela Hornung, “Von Mythen und Trümmern. Frauen im Wien der Nachkriegszeit,” Mitteilungen des Instituts für Wissenschaft und Kunst 4, (1990): 11–18.
[6] See: Irene Bandhauer-Schöffmann und Ela Hornung, “Das Geschlecht des Wiederaufbaus 1945 –55,” Die Universität, 2005, http://www.erinnerungsort.at/dokumente/hornung.pdf (last accessed 17 April 2019).
[7] See the accompanying catalogue of the exhibition: Historisches Museum der Stadt Wien (Hg.), Frauenleben 1945. Kriegsende in Wien. Sonderausstellung des Historischen Museums der Stadt Wien, 21. September – 19. November 1995 (Wien: Eigenverlag der Museen der Stadt Wien, 1995).
[8] Federal law establishing a one-off grant for women in recognition of their special achievements in the reconstruction of the Republic of Austria. BGBl. I Nr. 89/2005, https://www.ris.bka.gv.at/eli/bgbl/I/2005/89 (last accessed 17 April 2019).
[9] On the specific Austrian way of dealing with National Socialism in families, see: Margit Reiter, Die Generation danach. Der Nationalsozialismus im Familiengedächtnis (Innsbruck/Wien/Bozen: Studien Verlag, 2006).
[10] See: Harald Welzer, Sabine Moller und Karoline Tschuggnall, Opa war kein Nazi. Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust im Familiengedächtnis (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer, 2002); Meik Zülsdorf-Kerstin, Sechzig Jahre danach: Jugendliche und Holocaust. Eine Studie zur geschichtskulturellen Sozialisation (Berlin: LIT, 2007).
[11] Zum Begriff des “double speak” vgl.: Heidemarie Uhl, “The Politics of Memory: Austria’s Perception of the Second World War and the National Socialist Period,” in Austrian Historical Memory & National Identity, eds. Günther Bischof und Anton Pelinka (New Brunswick: Contemporary Austrian Studies, 1997), 64-94, 73-80; Heidemarie Uhl, “Vom Opfermythos zur Mitverantwortungsthese: NS-Herrschaft, Krieg und Holocaust im ’Österreichischen Gedächtnis,’” in Transformation gesellschaftlicher Erinnerung. Studien zur Gedächtnisgeschichte der Zweiten Republik, ed. Uhl Gerbel (Wien: Verlag Turia + Kant, 2005), 50-85, 60.
[12] See: Heidemarie Uhl, “Opferthesen, revisited. Österreichs ambivalenter Umgang mit der NS-Vergangenheit,” Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte 34-35, (2018): 47-54.
[13] See: H.C. Straches Rede anlässlich der Befreiungsfeier, online unter: https://www.bundeskanzleramt.gv.at/-/gedenken-an-die-opfer-des-nationalsozialismus-in-wien-und-mauthausen (last accessed 17 April 2019); H.C. Strache in der Tageszeitung “Die Presse”: “’Trümmerfrauen’: Stadt Wien auf Distanz zu Denkmal,” Die Presse, 1. Oktober 2018, https://diepresse.com/home/panorama/wien/5505951/Truemmerfrauen_Stadt-Wien-auf-Distanz-zu-Denkmal (last accessed 17 April 2019).
[14] Zur Einordnung der FPÖ als rechtsextreme Partei vgl. u.a.: Brigitte Bailer, Wolfgang Neugebauer, und Heribert Schiedel, “Die FPÖ auf dem Weg zur Regierungspartei. Zur Erfolgsgeschichte einer rechtsextremen Partei,” in Österreich und die rechte Versuchung, ed. Hans-Henning Scharsach (Reinbek: Rohwohlt, 2000), 105–127, S. 127; Philipp Mittnik, Die FPÖ – eine rechtsextreme Partei? Zur Radikalisierung der Freiheitlichen unter HC-Strache (Wien: LIT, 2010), 131; Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme, “Extremismus in den EU-Staaten. Theoretische und konzeptionelle Grundlagen,” in Extremismus in den EU-Staaten, eds. Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme (Wiesbaden: VS, 2011), 29; Samuel Salzborn, Angriff der Antidemokraten. Die völkische Rebellion der Neuen Rechten (Weinheim: Beltz Juventa, 2017), 135.
[15] See: Tony Judt, “The Past is Another Country: Myth and Memory in Postwar Europe,” in The politics of retribution in Europe : World War II and its aftermath, eds. István Deák, Jan T. Gross, and Tony Judt (Princton: Princeton University Press, 2000), 293–323.

_____________________

Image Credits

Monument for the Trümmerfrauen on the Mölkerbastei, 1010 Vienna © 2018 Kanisfluh, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Tschiggerl, Martin: Who owns the “Trümmerfrauen”? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 17, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13858.

Editorial Responsibility

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Rund um das am 1. Oktober 2018 durch den österreichischen Vizekanzler Heinz-Christian Strache (Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs – FPÖ) feierlich eröffnete Denkmal für die österreichischen Trümmerfrauen entwickelte sich im Spätherbst 2018 eine Diskussion, die ebenso gut vor 30 Jahren hätte geführt werden können und die in ähnlicher Form in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland bereits geführt worden war. Im Zentrum dieser Debatte stand die Frage, ob sich die so genannten “Trümmerfrauen” überhaupt ein Denkmal verdient hätten.

Oder: Der lange Atem des “Opfermythos”

Dank eindeutiger Quellenbestände wissen wir, dass ein großer Teil jener Menschen, die 1945 in den Straßen der großen österreichischen Städte den Schutt beseitigten, ehemalige Nationalsozialist*innen waren, die per Gesetz dazu gezwungen werden mussten, dies zu tun.[1] Auf dieses Faktum haben eine ganze Reihe von Historiker*innen bereits in den späten 1980er und frühen 1990er Jahren hingewiesen und taten dies anlässlich des Engagements von H.C. Straches erneut.[2] Dieser ließ sich aber nicht beirren und selbst ein flüchtiger Blick auf die Foren großer österreichischer Tageszeitungen zu diesem Themenkomplex zeigt, dass zumindest dort viele der User*innen H.C. Straches Bild von den unbelasteten “Trümmerfrauen”, die maßgeblich am Wiederaufbau Österreichs beteiligt waren, teilten.[3]

Wir sind Opfer!

Die “Trümmerfrauen” stehen sinnbildlich für einen österreichischen Umgang mit der NS-Zeit. Auch über 80 Jahre nach dem “Anschluss” Österreichs an NS-Deutschland ist in der Vorstellung vieler Österreicher*innen noch immer tief verwurzelt, Österreich sei das erste Opfer des NS-Staats gewesen. Obwohl dieser “Opfermythos” spätestens seit den 1980er Jahren in der Darstellung des offiziellen Österreichs zusehends erodierte und zumindest von Seiten der akademischen Geschichtswissenschaft als solcher dekonstruiert worden ist, bleibt seine Wirkmächtigkeit erhalten.[4] Den “Trümmerfrauen” wird dabei eine mehrfache Opferrolle zugeschrieben. Zunächst seien sie gemeinsam mit ganz Österreich Opfer der NS-Aggressionspolitik gewesen, deren Folgen sie durch die Beseitigung der Kriegsschäden auf den Straßen unmittelbar ausgesetzt waren. Gleichzeitig seien sie als Frauen Opfer der Männer gewesen – und auch das in gleich doppelter Hinsicht: Zuerst mussten sie die unmittelbaren Kriegsschäden des von den nationalsozialistischen Männern begonnenen Krieges beseitigen, dann wurde ihr Beitrag im maskulin konnotierten Wiederaufbaumythos des frühen Österreichs auch noch ausgeklammert.[5]

Die Geschichte der österreichischen “Trümmerfrauen” begann daher auch als Gegenerzählung der feministischen Geschichtswissenschaft zu diesem Wiederaufbaumythos. Doch während Historikerinnen wie Irene Bandhauer-Schöffmann und Ela Hornung bereits Ende der 1980er Jahre angemahnt haben, dass auch die Rolle der Frauen als Täter*innen und Mittäter*innen des NS-Systems berücksichtigt werden müsse, hat sich deren enthistorisierte und von der NS-Zeit abgekoppelte Mystifizierung offenbar bis heute gehalten.[6] Die “Trümmerfrauen” dienen als Chiffre für eine Generation, die nach der sprichwörtlichen “Stunde Null” Österreich aus Trümmern errichtet haben soll und in weiterer Folge als positiver Erinnerungsort. Dieser Erinnerungsort klammert die Vorgeschichte der Zerstörung der österreichischen Städte aber bewusst aus.

Trümmerfrauenmythos 3.0

Die Re-Aktualisierung des Trümmerfrauenmythos erfolgt in regelmäßigen Abständen entlang großer Gedenkjahre: 1995 durch die Ausstellung “Frauenleben in Österreich 1945”[7], 2005 durch das von der damaligen österreichischen Bundesregierung erlassene Bundesgesetz, “mit dem eine einmalige Zuwendung für Frauen als Anerkennung für ihre besonderen Leistungen beim Wiederaufbau der Republik Österreich geschaffen“[8] worden sei und eben H.C. Straches Engagement für das Trümmerfrauendenkmal 2018. Weshalb sich der österreichische Vizekanzler mehrmals öffentlich besonders positiv über die “Trümmerfrauen” geäußert hat, kann nur vermutet werden. Wahrscheinlich ist, dass es H.C. Strache wohl kaum um die Wähler*innenstimmen der tatsächlichen Trümmerfrauen-Generation gegangen sein dürfte.

Vielmehr könnten sich dieser symbolische Akt und H.C. Straches Aussagen bezüglich der “Trümmerfrauen” an die Kinder und im Speziellen auch an die Enkelgeneration der Betroffenen gerichtet haben, die demografisch eine deutlich wichtigere Wähler*innengruppe darstellen. Gerade diese Generationen könnten empfänglich sein für eine erneute “Weißwaschung” der österreichischen Geschichte und eine Renaissance des Opfermythos.[9] Dies deckt sich auch mit unterschiedlichen Studien aus der BRD, wonach besonders die Enkelgeneration große Schwierigkeiten damit habe, die nationalsozialistische Vergangenheit der Großeltern anzuerkennen,[10] was nicht zuletzt auch einem mangelnden Wissen über diese Zeit geschuldet sein könnte.

Wirkungslosigkeit der Geschichtswissenschaft?

Für die Geschichtswissenschaft und gerade für die Public History eröffnet dies die Frage, wie es besser als bisher gelingen kann, anschlussfähige Gegenerzählungen und wissenschaftliche Fakten über die Beteiligung der österreichischen Bevölkerung im NS-Staat zu etablieren. Denn auch wenn die “Opferthese” in der österreichischen Zeitgeschichtsforschung eindeutig falsifiziert ist, bleibt sie doch noch wirkmächtig. Der für den österreichischen Umgang mit der NS-Zeit typische “double speak” – das Postulat, das erste Opfer des Nationalsozialismus zu sein, bei gleichzeitigem Held*innengedenken für die Opfer des Krieges gegen den Nationalsozialismus – scheint in leicht abgewandelter Form bis heute überlebt zu haben.[11]

Wie geht richtiges Gedenken?

Die Verbrechen des Nationalsozialismus werden oft zwar anerkannt, aber nichtsdestotrotz losgelöst von der österreichischen Bevölkerung gesehen. Die Erinnerung an diese Verbrechen ist in Form des Holocaust-Gedenkens in höchstem Maße institutionalisiert, kann aber auch als rein symbolischer Erinnerungsort und leere Geste fungieren.[12] H.C. Strache eröffnete 2018 nicht nur das Trümmerfrauen-Denkmal, sondern sprach auch bei der Wiener Gedenkfeier am Tag der Internationalen Befreiungsfeier in Mauthausen und benutzte bei beiden Gelegenheiten den Begriff “Opfer” zur Beschreibung der Betroffenen[13]. Losgelöst von der Frage, ob ein Holocaust-Gedenken, dem sich auch der Obmann einer rechtsextremen Partei[14] anschließen kann, denn das richtige Gedenken ist, suggeriert diese Position einmal mehr die Gleichrangigkeit der Opfergruppen und erhebt die österreichische Bevölkerung – vertreten durch die “Trümmerfrauen” – kollektiv in den Stand der Opfer des Nationalsozialismus.[15]

Dies zeigt einmal mehr, dass die erinnerungspolitischen Debatten des späten 20. Jahrhunderts noch lange nicht abgeschlossen sind. Auch wenn selbst rechte politische Eliten ihr Mitgefühl für die Opfer des Holocaust zum Ausdruck bringen können, gibt es in der Öffentlichkeit bis heute noch genügend Spielraum, um die Verantwortung der damaligen österreichischen Gesellschaft zu negieren oder zumindest auszuklammern. Die tatsächliche Anerkennung einer gesellschaftlichen (Mit-)Schuld und die daraus zu ziehenden Konsequenzen scheinen in den letzten Jahren wieder weiter in die Ferne zu rücken.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Uhl, Heidemarie. “Opferthesen, revisited. Österreichs ambivalenter Umgang mit der NS-Vergangenheit. ” Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte 34-35, (2018),
  • http://www.bpb.de/apuz/274259/oesterreichs-ambivalenter-umgang-mit-der-ns-vergangenheit? (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).
  • Hammerstein, Katrin. Gemeinsame Vergangenheit – Getrennte Erinnerung? Der Nationalsozialismus in Gedächtnisdiskursen und Identitätskonstruktionen von Bundesrepublik Deutschland, DDR und Österreich. Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2017.
  • Berg, Matthew P. “Arbeitspflicht in Postwar Vienna. Punishing Nazis vs. Expediting Reconstruction 1945-48.History 39 (2006), http://collected.jcu.edu/hist-facpub/39 (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Gemeinsam mit Thomas Walach arbeite ich derzeit an einem Forschungsprojekt zu “Trümmerfrauen”, dessen erste Ergebnisse wahrscheinlich im Herbst 2019 veröffentlicht werden. Vgl. Matthew P. Berg, “Arbeitspflicht in Postwar Vienna. Punishing Nazis vs. Expediting Reconstruction 1945-48,” History 39, (2006), http://collected.jcu.edu/hist-facpub/39 (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).
[2] Peter Mayr, “Historikerinnen gegen Wiener Denkmal für Trümmerfrauen, ” Der Standard 1. Oktober 2018, https://derstandard.at/2000088377977/Historikerinnen-gegen-ein-Denkmal-fuer-die-Truemmerfrauen (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).
[3] “Strache enthüllt Denkmal für Trümmerfrauen, ” Kronen Zeitung, 1. Oktober 2018, https://www.krone.at/1781055 (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019); “Strache enthüllt Denkmal für Trümmerfrauen,” Die Presse, 1. Oktober 2018, https://diepresse.com/home/zeitgeschichte/5505798/Strache-enthuellt-Denkmal-fuer-Truemmerfrauen-in-Wien (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).
[4] Zum “Opfermythos” vgl. Heidemarie Uhl, “Opferthesen, revisited. Österreichs ambivalenter Umgang mit der NS-Vergangenheit,” Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte 34-35, (2018); und “Österreich”, S. 47-54; Katrin Hammerstein, Gemeinsame Vergangenheit – Getrennte Erinnerung? Der Nationalsozialismus in Gedächtnisdiskursen und Identitätskonstruktionen von Bundesrepublik Deutschland, DDR und Österreich (Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2017).
[5] Vgl. Irene Bandhauer-Schöffmann und Ela Hornung, “Von Mythen und Trümmern. Frauen im Wien der Nachkriegszeit,” Mitteilungen des Instituts für Wissenschaft und Kunst 4, (1990): 11–18.
[6] Vgl. Irene Bandhauer-Schöffmann und Ela Hornung, “Das Geschlecht des Wiederaufbaus 1945 –55,” Die Universität, 2005, http://www.erinnerungsort.at/dokumente/hornung.pdf (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).
[7] Vgl. Historisches Museum der Stadt Wien (Hg.), Frauenleben 1945. Kriegsende in Wien. Sonderausstellung des Historischen Museums der Stadt Wien, 21. September – 19. November 1995 (Wien: Eigenverlag der Museen der Stadt Wien, 1995).
[8] Bundesgesetz, mit dem eine einmalige Zuwendung für Frauen als Anerkennung für ihre besonderen Leistungen beim Wiederaufbau der Republik Österreich geschaffen wird. BGBl. I Nr. 89/2005, https://www.ris.bka.gv.at/eli/bgbl/I/2005/89 (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).
[9] Zum spezifisch österreichischen Umgang mit dem Nationalsozialismus in Familien vgl.: Margit Reiter, Die Generation danach. Der Nationalsozialismus im Familiengedächtnis (Innsbruck/Wien/Bozen: Studien Verlag, 2006).
[10] Vgl. u.a.: Harald Welzer, Sabine Moller und Karoline Tschuggnall, Opa war kein Nazi. Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust im Familiengedächtnis (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer, 2002); Meik Zülsdorf-Kerstin, Sechzig Jahre danach: Jugendliche und Holocaust. Eine Studie zur geschichtskulturellen Sozialisation (Berlin: LIT, 2007).
[11] Zum Begriff des “double speak” vgl.: Heidemarie Uhl, “The Politics of Memory: Austria’s Perception of the Second World War and the National Socialist Period,” in Austrian Historical Memory & National Identity, eds. Günther Bischof und Anton Pelinka (New Brunswick: Contemporary Austrian Studies, 1997), 64-94, 73-80; Heidemarie Uhl, “Vom Opfermythos zur Mitverantwortungsthese: NS-Herrschaft, Krieg und Holocaust im ’Österreichischen Gedächtnis,’” in Transformation gesellschaftlicher Erinnerung. Studien zur Gedächtnisgeschichte der Zweiten Republik, ed. Uhl Gerbel (Wien: Verlag Turia + Kant, 2005), 50-85, 60.
[12] Vgl. Heidemarie Uhl, “Opferthesen, revisited. Österreichs ambivalenter Umgang mit der NS-Vergangenheit,” Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte 34-35, (2018): 47-54.
[13] Vgl. H.C. Straches Rede anlässlich der Befreiungsfeier, online unter: https://www.bundeskanzleramt.gv.at/-/gedenken-an-die-opfer-des-nationalsozialismus-in-wien-und-mauthausen (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019); H.C. Strache in der Tageszeitung “Die Presse”: “’Trümmerfrauen’: Stadt Wien auf Distanz zu Denkmal,” Die Presse, 1. Oktober 2018, https://diepresse.com/home/panorama/wien/5505951/Truemmerfrauen_Stadt-Wien-auf-Distanz-zu-Denkmal (letzter Zugriff 17. April 2019).
[14] Zur Einordnung der FPÖ als rechtsextreme Partei vgl. u.a.: Brigitte Bailer, Wolfgang Neugebauer, und Heribert Schiedel, “Die FPÖ auf dem Weg zur Regierungspartei. Zur Erfolgsgeschichte einer rechtsextremen Partei,” in Österreich und die rechte Versuchung, ed. Hans-Henning Scharsach (Reinbek: Rohwohlt, 2000), 105–127, S. 127; Philipp Mittnik, Die FPÖ – eine rechtsextreme Partei? Zur Radikalisierung der Freiheitlichen unter HC-Strache (Wien: LIT, 2010), 131; Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme, “Extremismus in den EU-Staaten. Theoretische und konzeptionelle Grundlagen,” in Extremismus in den EU-Staaten, eds. Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme (Wiesbaden: VS, 2011), 29; Samuel Salzborn, Angriff der Antidemokraten. Die völkische Rebellion der Neuen Rechten (Weinheim: Beltz Juventa, 2017), 135.
[15] Vgl. Tony Judt, “The Past is Another Country: Myth and Memory in Postwar Europe,” in The politics of retribution in Europe : World War II and its aftermath, eds. István Deák, Jan T. Gross, and Tony Judt (Princton: Princeton University Press, 2000), 293–323.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Denkmal für die Trümmerfrauen nach dem 2. Weltkrieg auf der Mölkerbastei, 1010 Wien © 2018 Kanisfluh, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Tschiggerl, Martin: Wem gehören die “Trümmerfrauen”? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 17, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13858.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 17
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13858

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest