The Whig Tradition and Commonwealth History

Whig-Tradition und Commonwealth-Geschichte


It is not easy to disentangle British history from that of the Commonwealth of Nations, but a different way of looking at both is needed in order to get to the position where what is being considered is not so much what Britain has done to the Commonwealth, but what the Commonwealth itself has decided should be the nature of its own fate. What is remarkable is the voluntary appropriation of what is to all intends and purposes a Whig manifesto as the Commonwealth’s own Charter. Despite the Charter’s shortcomings, ably examined by Philip Murphy,[1] its affirmation of the crucial Harare Declaration, 1991, demonstrates that it is the latest manifestation of the values and principles which form the basis for whether membership is enjoyed or withdrawn. These decisions are made not by the British government, but by one of the Commonwealth’s own sub-committees, the Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group (CMAG).

A Different View of Commonwealth History

When it was decided to discuss the suspension of the Maldives in October 2016 the nine-person CMAG membership consisted of Cyprus, Guyana, Kenya, India, Malta, Namibia, New Zealand, Pakistan and the Solomon Islands. Murphy’s criticism centres around the decision to go ahead with the 2013 CHOGM (Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting) in Sri Lanka, which itself had fallen short of the Charter’s values and principles.[2]

It is perhaps ironical that the basis for much of the CMAG’s decision-making is taken from the Harare Declaration which laid out, as Daruwala and Srivastava state,

“these Commonwealth values [which] include democracy, democratic processes and institutions which reflect national circumstances, the rule of law and the independence of the judiciary, just and honest government; [and] fundamental human rights, including equal rights and opportunities for all citizens regardless of race, colour, creed or political belief”.[3]

Harare (Zimbabwe) had been the venue for the 1991 CHOGM.

The Role of CMAG in Suspending Membership

Crucial to the continuation of membership is evidence of internal politics that includes space for opposition and a multi-party system. Those jurisdictions where opposition is suppressed (e.g. if there is a military coup followed by a dictatorship) or where election results or judicial processes are tampered with, risk suspension. This has happened in several recent cases (suspension or leaving dates, voluntary or enforced, are given in brackets): South Africa (withdrew 1961, rejoined 1994); Pakistan (withdrew 1972, rejoined in 1989; 1999-2004; 2007-2008); Zimbabwe (from 2002; withdrew 2003); Nigeria (1995-1999); Fiji (1987-1997; partial suspension 2006-2009; full 2009-2014); Gambia (2013-2018); the Maldives (withdrew from 2016). It seems remarkable, but perhaps not unsurprising, that countries like Mozambique and Rwanda (which joined in 2009), with no history of involvement in the British Empire, but which had experienced in one case a costly war associated with the fall-out from decolonisation, and in the other the worst aspects of genocidal ethnic cleansing, would voluntarily seek to join the Commonwealth. Like Mozambique, Cameroon joined in 1995, but still has unresolved tensions between its different regions, corresponding broadly with its French- and English-speaking areas.[4]

Historians and the Whig Tradition

It is ironical that Herbert Butterfield’s critique, The Whig Interpretation of History, was published in 1931,[5] the same year as the Statute of Westminster. This statute confirmed the devolution of decision-making powers to the parliaments of the dominions. In those days the British Empire consisted of dominions (Australia, Canada, Newfoundland, New Zealand, Ireland and South Africa) and dozens of colonies. Also, a factor noted by E.H.Carr,[6] is that Butterfield’s work pre-dated the Nazi fascist regime, and was published before the full extent of the horrors of the different brands of Nazi and Soviet totalitarianism became known. In 1944, no doubt bearing in mind the intervening years, he would provide a gloss to his former work by distinguishing between the Whig interpretation, which had to him smacked of sloppy historiographical process, and the Whig tradition which when applied to British history still had some significance, especially in the light of what Butterfield perceived to be the imperatives driving the course of the war.[7]

Nevertheless, the sense of British progress which had characterised the Whig interpretation was severely disrupted by the overwhelming losses and sheer bloodshed of the First World War. In a world where empires and imperial structures were clashing then failing, the British Empire continued, although clearly not without challenges, notably from Mohandas Gandhi in India. Nevertheless, Whig historians like G.M.Trevelyan, writing in 1934[8]– a section that David Cannadine in his biography of Trevelyan singles out as the best definition of the Whig interpretation[9] – could still see a sharp difference between key aspects of the British way and contemporary developments in Europe.[10]

The Fifth Pan-African Congress

Of course the contribution of the British Empire to both the First and Second World Wars was massive. This has recently been re-examined by Yasmin Khan in The Raj at War.[11] Then there was the price which had to be paid for American involvement, as set out in the Atlantic Charter from 14 August 1941. This was reluctantly agreed by Winston Churchill, and the Charter actively anticipated a plan for the independence of British colonies. When activists, mainly from the African and Caribbean colonies, including some future heads of state like Kwame Nkrumah (Ghana), Jomo Kenyatta (Kenya) and Hastings Kamuzu Banda (Malawi), met at the Fifth Pan-African Congress in Manchester in October 1945, the promises of the Atlantic Charter were very much on the agenda. As a landmark event in the histories of several African and Caribbean states, the importance of this Congress cannot be underestimated (see Adi and Sherwood with Padmore, 1995).[12] Ghana would gain independence in 1957, Trinidad and Tobago (home of George Padmore) in 1962, Kenya in 1963, and Malawi in 1964. But all of these jurisdictions joined the Commonwealth at the same time as gaining independence.

The Reid Commission and Sir Ivor Jennings

Another event which is worth noting is the work of the Reid Commission (1956-1957)[13] in drafting the Constitution of Malaya. Notable here is the involvement of constitutional expert Sir William Ivor Jennings, who also advised D. S. Senanayake in drafting the Constitution of Ceylon (later Sri Lanka). Jennings’ work has recently been the subject of research by H. Kumarasingham and others.[14]

The apparently voluntary appropriation of certain Whig principles by former colonial states whose leaders had often been radicals, and the subsequent development of a collective political self-awareness is a historical factor that has probably not been fully recognised. It might also be claimed that the eliding of British and post-colonial or Commonwealth history is largely a missing paradigm.[15]

Almost the last word will go to former US Secretary of State, Madeleine Albright, who (with Bill Woodward) writes: “With help from its friends, however, democracy can almost always be repaired, then made better”.[16] This would of course apply equally to the UK itself, as one of the sixteen Commonwealth realms, but essentially its centrifugal force, bearing in mind that the Windrush scandal emerged in (nearly) all its painful detail while the London CHOGM was still in session.[17]

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Adi, Hakim, Marika Sherwood, and George Padmore, eds. The 1945 Manchester Pan-African Congress Revisited. With Colonial and … Coloured Unity. The Report of the Pan-African Congress. London: New Beacon Books, 1995. (The essay of George Padmore was originally published 1947 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. The text is partially online: https://www.marxists.org/pan-african-congress/ (last accessed 26 September 2018)).
  • Murphy, Philip. Monarchy and the End of Empire – The House of Windsor, the British Government and the Postwar Commonwealth. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Philip Murphy, The Empire’s New Clothes – The Myth of the Commonwealth (London: Hurst & Company, 2018), 143-161.
[2] CMAG was established in November 1995 at Millbrook Resort, in Queenstown, New Zealand, as a result of the Millbrook Commonwealth Action Programme, to punish serious or persistent violations of the Harare Declaration. The next set of CMAG members after October 2016 were foreign ministers from: Kenya (Chair), Australia (Vice-Chair), Barbados, Belize, Ghana, Malaysia, Namibia, Samoa and the United Kingdom. The UK is there because it provides the extant Commonwealth Chairperson-in-office. The Harare Declaration was reinforced at the CMAG meeting held in the Republic of Trinidad & Tobago, 27-29 November 2009 by the Affirmation of Commonwealth Values and Principles.
[3] Maja Daruwala und Devyani Srivastava, “The Maldives, CMAG and the Commonwealth: A perspective,“ in The Round Table – The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs 7 (October 2016): https://www.commonwealthroundtable.co.uk/journal/ (last accessed 25 September 2018).
[4]The re-admission of The Gambia into the Commonwealth in 2018 followed (a) United Nations Security Council Resolution 2337 to restore democracy in The Gambia; and (b) military intervention in January 2017 by ECOWAS. The military occupation is scheduled to continue until 2022.
[5] Herbert Butterfield, The Whig Interpretation of History (London: G.Bell, 1931).
[6] Edward Hallet Carr, What is History? The George Macaulay Trevelyan Lectures delivered in the University of Cambridge, January-March, 1961 (London: Macmillan, 1961).
[7] Herbert Butterfield, The Englishman and his History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1944).
[8] George Maculay Trevelyan, England under Queen Anne: The Peace and the Protestant Succession (London: Longman, 1934).
[9] David Cannadine, G.M.Trevelyan – A Life in History (London: HarperCollins, 1992).
[10] Trevelyan wrote about the reign of Queen Anne (1702-1714) and subsequent years: ‘The establishment of liberty was not the result of the complete triumph of any one party in the State. It was the result of the balance of political parties and religious states, compelled to tolerate one another, until toleration became a habit of the national mind’ (321). He adds another feature of this situation: ‘… and a constant respect for the latent power of political opponents, who were fellow subjects …’ (321). This was not just about the rule of law, which would later become one of the sixteen sub-sections of the Charter of the Commonwealth, but also about achieving modifications in the law and settling differences not by violence but by parliamentary modification.
[11] Yasmin Khan, The Raj at War (London: The Bodley Head, 2015).
[12] The first session was presided over by W.E.B. DuBois, and combined the drive for decolonisation with a radical agenda and a strong commitment to socialist and even Marxist principles.
[13] “Report of the Federation of Malaya Constitutional Commission, 1957“ (London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1957), Colonial No. 330.
[14] Harshan Kumarasingham, ed., Constitution Maker: Select Writings of Sir Ivor Jennings, (Camden 5 Series, Volume 46) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015) and Harshan Kumarasingham, ed., Constitution-Making in Asia – Decolonisation and State-building in the aftermath of the British Empire (London: Routledge, 2016).
[15] The work of Philip Murphy (2012, 2018) to some extent links British and Commonwealth history. It exhibits a highly critical stance towards the Commonwealth as an institution and the political developments of its component states since its transformation in the late 1940s, while nevertheless seeking to provide evidence of the often difficult relationship between British political and diplomatic institutions and the various manifestations of the Commonwealth itself.
[16] Madeleine Albright, Fascism – A Warning (London: William Collins, 2018), 109.
[17] Estelle Shirbon, “May apologises to Caribbean countries for UK treatment of post-war migrants,“ Reuters (17 April 2018). https://uk.reuters.com/may-apologises-to-caribbean(last accessed 25 September 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

2018 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting © CC BY-NC 2.0 Commonwealth Secretariat.

Recommended Citation

Guyver, Robert: The Whig Tradition and Commonwealth History. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 32, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12617.

Editorial Responsibility

Rachel Huber / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Es ist nicht einfach, die Geschichte Großbritanniens von der des Commonwealth of Nations loszulösen. Dennoch ist ein Perspektivenwechsel in Bezug auf beide Narrative notwendig, um einen Standpunkt einnehmen zu können, bei dem es nicht so sehr darum geht, wie Großbritannien das Commonwealth beeinflusst hat, sondern darum, was das Commonwealth selbst entschieden hat, um seine Zukunft zu steuern. Beachtenswert dabei ist die freiwillige Aneignung von etwas, das man im Grunde ein Whig-Manifest nennen muss: die Charta des Commonwealth. Trotz ihrer Unzulänglichkeiten, kompetent analysiert von Philip Murphy,[1] beweist die darin enthaltene Bekräftigung der Harare-Deklaration von 1991, dass die Charta die Manifestation der Werte und Prinzipien ist, die die Grundlage für die Klärung des Status der Angehörigen des Commonwealth bildet, dafür, ob ein Mitglied Teil der Gemeinschaft bleiben kann oder nicht. Diese Entscheidungen werden nicht von Großbritannien gefällt, sondern von einem Unterkomitee des Commonwealth: der Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group (CMAG).

Neuer Blick den Commonwealth

Als im Oktober 2016 darüber beraten wurde, ob die Malediven als Mitglied suspendiert werden sollten, bestand das CMAG aus den Mitgliedern Zypern, Guyana, Kenya, Indien, Malta, Namibien, Neuseeland, Pakistan und den Salomonen. Murphys Kritik fokussiert sich auf die Entscheidung, die Sitzung des Commonwealth Heads of Government (CHGM) 2013 in Sri Lanka abzuhalten, welches die Werte, die in der Commonwealth-Charta hochgehalten werden, zu diesem Zeitpunkt nicht mehr vertrat.[2]

Es mag ironisch anmuten, dass die Harare-Deklaration (1991) die Grundlage für einen beachtlichen Teil der Entscheidungsfindung in der CMAG liefert. Daruwala und Srivastava zeigen diesen Wertekatalog des Commonwealth auf:

“demokratische Grundwerte, respektive das Implementieren von demokratischen Prozessen und Institutionen, die aktuelle nationale Gegebenheiten reflektieren, die Garantie von Rechtsstaatlichkeit und unabhängiger Justiz, eine gerechte und transparente Regierung, die Garantie fundamentaler Menschenrechte, das Antizipieren von Gleichberechtigung und die Möglichkeit für alle Bürger*innen zu prosperieren für alle Bürger*innen ungeachtet von Hautfarbe, Herkunft, Glaube und politischer Einstellung.“[3]

CMAG und Mitgliedschaft

Unabdingbar für die Aufrechterhaltung der Mitgliedschaft ist der Nachweis, dass innenpolitisch Raum für Opposition und ein Mehrparteiensystem gegeben ist. Diejenigen Rechtssysteme, in denen politische Oppositionen unterdrückt werden (wenn nach einem Militärputsch eine Diktatur folgt), in denen Wahlergebnisse oder die Rechtsprechung illegal beeinflusst wurden, riskieren suspendiert zu werden. Bei folgenden Ländern war dies der Fall (die Austrittsdaten, freiwillig oder erzwungen, werden in Klammern genannt): Südafrika (Austritt: 1961, Wiedereintritt: 1994); Pakistan: (Austritt: 1972, Wiedereintritt: 1989); Zimbabwe (Austritt: 2003); Nigeria (1995-1999); Fidschi (1989-1997; partielle Suspension von 2006-2009, Suspension von 2009-2014); Gambia (2013-2018) und die Malediven (Austritt: 2016).

Es ist bemerkenswert, dass Länder wie Mozambique (Beitritt 1995) und Ruanda (Beitritt 2009), die keinen historischen Konnex zum britischen Reich hatten (ersteres führte einen kostspieligen Krieg im Zusammenhang mit der Dekolonisierung; in Ruanda fand ein grausamer Genozid statt) den Wunsch äußerten, freiwillig dem Commonwealth beizutreten. Wie Mozambique, so trat auch Kamerun 1995 bei, obwohl in diesem afrikanischen Staat die Lage zu diesem Zeitpunkt – in erster Linie entlang der Grenzen der englisch- und französischsprachigen Landesteile – äußerst angespannt war.[4]

Historiker*innen und die Whig-Tradition

Ironisch ist zudem, dass Herbert Butterfields Kritik The Whig Interpretation of History[5] im gleichen Jahr (1931) publiziert wurde wie das Statut von Westminster. Das Statut bestätigte die Dezentralisierung der Entscheidungsmacht: weg vom Empire hin zu den Parlamenten der diversen Herrschaftsgebiete (Dominions – zu dieser Zeit bestand das Britische Reich aus den Dominions Australien, Kanada, Neufundland, Neuseeland, Irland und Südafrika sowie etlichen weiteren Kolonien). Ein weiterer Faktor, der von E.H. Carr betont wird,[6] ist, dass Butterfields Werk vor der nationalsozialistischen Herrschaft geschrieben, also vor den totalitären Phasen des Dritten Reiches und der Sowjetunion publiziert wurde.

1944 beschönigte er dann, zweifelsohne mit dem Zivilisationsbruch im Hinterkopf, sein Werk, indem er zwischen einer Whig Interpretation und einer Whig Tradition unterschied, welche, auf die britische Geschichte angewandt, von nicht geringer Bedeutung war – gerade in Bezug auf die Zwänge, welche für Butterfield den Verlauf des Krieges bestimmten.[7]

Gleichwohl war das Gefühl des britischen Fortschritts, das insbesondere in der Whig Interpretation betont wird, nach den überwältigenden Verlusten und dem Blutvergießen im Ersten Weltkrieg nachhaltig zerstört. Obwohl Großmächte und imperiale Strukturen als Ergebnis von zwei Weltkriegen aufeinanderprallten und letztlich auseinanderbrachen, versuchte Großbritannien sein Imperium aufrechtzuerhalten. Es wurde jedoch maßgeblich von Gegenkräften herausgefordert, unter anderem von Mohandas Gandhi in Indien. Trotzdem beobachteten Whig-Historiker wie G.M. Trevelyan[8] – David Cannadine bemerkt in seiner Biographie zu Trevelyan, dass es sich dabei um die beste Whig Interpretation handelte[9] – einen klaren Unterschied zwischen den Hauptaspekten des britischen Weges und den zeitgenössischen Entwicklungen in Europa.[10]

Der 5. pan-afrikanische Kongress

Zweifelsohne war der Beitrag des Britischen Reiches an beide Weltkriege enorm, ein Umstand, der jüngst von Yasmin Khan in The Raj at War erneut untersucht wurde.[11] Zudem zahlte Großbritannien einen Preis für die amerikanische Unterstützung im Zweiten Weltkrieg im Rahmen der Lend-Lease-Zahlungen. Zum Inhalt der Atlantik-Charta, die am 14. August 1941 in Jalta aufgesetzt wurde, gab Winston Churchill nur zögerlich seine Zustimmung, diktierte die Erklärung implizit doch die Befreiung der britischen Kolonien. Aber als sich diverse Aktivist*innen – unter anderem zukünftige Staatspräsidenten wie Kwame Nkrumah (Ghana), Jomo Kenyatta (Kenia) und Hastings Kamuzu Banda (Malawi) – aus Afrika und der Karibik im Oktober 1945 zum 5. Pan-Afrikanischen Kongress in Manchester trafen, waren die Versprechungen der Atlantik-Charta sehr prominent auf der Tagesordnung. Dieser Kongress, dessen Signifikanz nicht genug betont werden kann,[12] muss in diesem Zusammenhang als bahnbrechend für die Geschichte einiger karibischer und afrikanischer Staaten gesehen werden. Ghana wurde 1957 unabhängig, Trinidad und Tobago 1962, Kenia 1963 und Malawi 1964. Alle diese Nationen jedoch traten dem Commonwealth genau zu demjenigen Zeitpunkt bei, als sie unabhängig wurden.

Reid-Kommission und Sir Ivor Jennings

Auch die Arbeit der Reid-Kommission (1956-1957),[13] welche die Verfassung von Malaysia entworfen hatte, muss hier erwähnt werden, insbesondere die Beteiligung des Verfassungsrechtsexperten Sir William Ivor Jennings, der auch D.S. Senanayake beim Entwerfen der Verfassung von Ceylon (heute Sri Lanka) beraten hatte. Die Arbeit von Jennings wurde jüngst von H. Kumarasingham und anderen erforscht.[14]

Die augenscheinlich freiwillige Aneignung gewisser Whig-Prinzipien durch ehemalige Kolonien, deren Anführer nicht selten radikal agierten, und die folgende Entwicklung eines kollektiven politischen Selbstbewusstseins ist ein historischer Faktor, der bis dato nicht vollumfänglich beachtet wurde. Außerdem könnte auch behauptet werden, dass die Geschichte des Commonwealth innerhalb der britischen und post-kolonialen Geschichtsschreibung bis dato vernachlässigt worden ist.

Fast das letzte Wort bekommt die ehemalige US-Außenministerin, Madeleine Albright, die (mit Bill Woodward) schreibt: “Mit Hilfe ihrer Freunde kann Demokratie fast immer wieder hergestellt und danach besser gemacht werden.“[16]. Diese Aussage lässt sich ohne Weiteres auf das Vereinigte Königreich anwenden, welches selbst eines der 16 Gebiete des Commenwealth darstellt und dennoch die eigentliche zentrifugale Kraft ausmacht, wenn man den Windrush-Skandal in Betracht zieht, der just dann mit all den schmerzhaften Details an die Öffentlichkeit gelangte, als die CHOGM in London tagte.[17]

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Adi, Hakim, Marika Sherwood, und George Padmore, eds. The 1945 Manchester Pan-African Congress Revisited. With Colonial and … Coloured Unity. The Report of the Pan-African Congress. London: New Beacon Books, 1995. (Der Essay von George Padmore ist ursprünglich 1947 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, veröffentlicht worden. Der Text ist teilweise online: https://www.marxists.org/pan-african-congress/ (letzter Zugriff 25. September 2018)).
  • Murphy, Philip. Monarchy and the End of Empire – The House of Windsor, the British Government and the Postwar Commonwealth. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Philip Murphy, The Empire’s New Clothes – The Myth of the Commonwealth (London: Hurst & Company, 2018), 143-161.
[2] Die CMAG wurde im November 1995 im Millbrook Resort in Queenstown, NZ gegründet, als Resultat des Millbrook Commonwealth Action Programme, das zum Ziel hatte, etwaige Vergehen gegen die Prämissen der Harare Deklaration zu ahnden. CMAG Mitglieder ab 2016: Kenya (Vorsitzende), Australien (stellvertretender Vorsitz), Barbados, Belize, Ghana, Malaysia, Namibia, Samoa und das Vereinigte Königreich (GB). Großbritannien ist unter anderem Mitglied, weil es die übrig gebliebene Vorsitzende bereitstellt. Die Harare Deklaration wurde an der CMAG Tagung in der Republik Trinidad & Tobago 2009 durch die Bekräftigung der Commonwealth Werte und Prinzipien bekräftigt.
[3] Maja Daruwala und Devyani Srivastava, “The Maldives, CMAG and the Commonwealth: A perspective,“ in The Round Table – The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs 7 (October 2016): https://www.commonwealthroundtable.co.uk/journal/ (letzter Zugriff 25. September 2018).
[4] Die Wiederzulassung von Gambia in die Commonwealth Gemeinschaft 2018 basierte einerseits auf der UNO Sicherheitsrat Entscheidung 2337, in Gambia demokratische Strukturen wiederaufzubauen und andereseits auf der von der ECOWAS durchgeführten militärischen Intervention, die im Januar 2017 begann und bis 2022 andauern soll.
[5] Herbert Butterfield, The Whig Interpretation of History (London: G.Bell, 1931).
[6] Edward Hallet Carr, What is History? The George Macaulay Trevelyan Lectures delivered in the University of Cambridge, January-March, 1961 (London: Macmillan, 1961).
[7] Herbert Butterfield, The Englishman and his History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1944).
[8] George Maculay Trevelyan, England under Queen Anne: The Peace and the Protestant Succession (London: Longman, 1934).
[9] David Cannadine, G.M.Trevelyan – A Life in History (London: HarperCollins, 1992).
[10] Trevelyan schrieb über die Herrschaft von Queen Anne (1702-1714) und die fortfolgenden Jahre: ‘The establishment of liberty was not the result of the complete triumph of any one party in the State. It was the result of the balance of political parties and religious states, compelled to tolerate one another, until toleration became a habit of the national mind’ (S. 321). Er ergänzt: ‘… and a constant respect for the latent power of political opponents, who were fellow subjects …’  (S. 321). Dabei ging es nicht nur um die Herrschaft des Gesetzes, ein der 16 Unterabschnitte der Commonwealth Charta, sondern auch darum parlamentarisch – und nicht gewaltvoll – gesetzliche Anpassungen durchzubringen.
[11] Yasmin Khan, The Raj at War (London: The Bodley Head, 2015).
[12] Bei der ersten Sitzung hatte W. E. B. Du Bois den Vositz, der einen radikalen Ansatz mit der Hingebung zu sozialistischen und marxistischen Werten vereinte.
[13] “Report of the Federation of Malaya Constitutional Commission, 1957“ (London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1957), Colonial No. 330.
[14] Harshan Kumarasingham, ed., Constitution Maker: Select Writings of Sir Ivor Jennings, (Camden 5 Series, Volume 46) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015) and Harshan Kumarasingham, ed., Constitution-Making in Asia – Decolonisation and State-building in the aftermath of the British Empire (London: Routledge, 2016).
[15] Die Arbeit von Philip Murphy (2012, 2018) verbindet die Geschichte des Commonwealth mit der Großbritanniens. Sie bezieht einen kritischen Standpunkt in Bezug auf das Commonwealth als eine Institution und die politische Entwicklung auf seine Mitglieder seit seiner Transformation in den späten 1940er-Jahren. Trotzdem versucht es Beweise für die schwierieg Beziehung zwischen der britischen Diplomatie und den vielen Manifestationen des Commonwealth zu liefern.
[16] Madeleine Albright, Fascism – A Warning (London: William Collins, 2018), 109.
[17] Estelle Shirbon, “May apologises to Caribbean countries for UK treatment of post-war migrants,“ Reuters (17 April 2018). https://uk.reuters.com/may-apologises-to-caribbean(letzter Zugriff 25. September 2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

2018 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting © CC BY-NC 2.0 Commonwealth Secretariat.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Guyver, Robert: Whig-Tradition und Commonwealth-Geschichte. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 32, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12617.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Rachel Huber / Peter Gautschi (Team Luzern)

Übersetzung: Rachel Huber

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 6 (2018) 32
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12617

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest