Against Empathy in History?

Gegen Empathie in der Geschichte?


Empathy is undoubtedly a good thing, right? Barack Obama certainly thought so. He declared before and during his presidency that America’s federal deficit was less of a problem than its “empathy deficit”. His message to graduating students in commencement speeches across the country: cultivate empathy – the world doesn’t just revolve around you.[1]

Empathy Cannot Motivate Us to Cross a Street

Writers on the so-called dark side of empathy are less certain. Fritz Breithaupt warns that empathy is not a sugarcoated method of happy community building – it can arouse negative feelings towards others and put the feelings it captures in others to negative ends. Jesse Prinz draws attention to empathy’s limitations as a motivator for moral action. While people are often willing to help others suffering directly in front of them, a far smaller proportion cross the street to give the same assistance. We may do better for others by remaining in our footwear and, perhaps by anger or a sense of injustice, acting on their behalf when values to which we are universally committed are infringed. Paul Bloom believes that empathy is a sacred cow whose time has come for the slaughterhouse, making way for a “rational compassion” capable of extending human goodwill beyond the narrow preferences determined by immediate impulses.[2]

To what extent do these criticisms hold true for historical understanding? A question I ask at the outset of Empathy and History, a dual exploration of empathy’s educational and intellectual history, is: if empathy cannot motivate us to cross a street, how can it inspire us to journey into the “foreign country” that is the past, populated by characters who take work to understand?

Cornerstone of Historical Inquiry

Empathy was introduced to history education to fulfil an ethical purpose. Just as the celebrated English social historian E.P. Thompson had endeavoured to rescue the everyday person from the “enormous condescension of posterity”, so history educationalists working from expanded university departments of education in the 1960s and 1970s believed that empathy could save school students from judging the past by present-day standards.[3] With a little empathy, students could learn to view history less as a catalogue of foolish behavior and more as a humanly study of past peoples who acted within a context of possibilities and limitations specific to their time and place.

R.G. Collingwood’s concept of re-enactment sat behind this educational formulation of empathy. Together with the comprehensive revolution in England that brought students of mixed academic abilities under the one roof, a largely Piagetian research framework that made out history to be a difficult subject for only the most academically gifted yielded to an outlook whereby students of all ages and talents could learn the basic structure of the disciplines behind the school subjects. In their efforts to establish history’s conceptual basis, history educationalists saw historians doing what history students typically had not done: they penetrated behind appearances and achieved insight into historical situations; they revived, relived and re-experienced the hopes, fears, plans, desires, views and intentions of those they sought to understand. Empathy was laid as the cornerstone of a structure of historical inquiry designed to have students achieve this task.[4]

An Empty Form of Knowledge?

What was strange about Collingwood’s name being attached to empathy was that Collingwood never used the term; in fact, he inveighed specifically against all forms of pyschologism in historical thinking.[5] To him, any form of historical thinking that eliminated the distinction between past and present, subject and object, violated the essentially critical nature of constructing historical knowledge. Though he argued in the theory of “incapsulation” that past “processes” inhere in present-day processes, he was adamant that the re-enactment of past thought disentangles these knots and holds up the past as an object of present-day criticism. Empathetic understanding, in coveting transcendence between past and present, provided no vantage point from which this critical reflection could take place. The early phenomenologists held a similar criticism, regarding empathy as an empty form of knowledge that produces nothing novel against the self.

Efforts to depsychologise the human sciences were a main feature of twentieth-century hermeneutics. Hans-Georg Gadamer reacted against the empathy-dependent historical consciousness of his forebears, formulating instead a concept of historically effected consciousness that sought not to recover the past, but rather to integrate it with the present by remaining conscious of its function as the “tradition” through which all understanding takes place. A student of Heidegger, Gadamer was assisted in this task from an unlikely source: Collingwood and his logic of question and answer. If in empathy history educationalists have stressed the importance of studying historical context, in what Gadamer termed the dialectic of question and answer is a means for investigating a past guided by present-day questions and concerns.

Collingwood and Gadamer were deeply dissatisfied with the individualising psychologism of the empathy-dependent tradition of historical thought. My account of this history is in essence an attempt to remedy a harmful imbalance in history education research: a fascination with the personal and local at the expense of the shared, universal and publicly contestable. I attempt to restore to history a big-picture outlook missing from the individual-to-individual conception of empathy in history education. The current threat to liberal traditions is global, and the language of personal kinship with a local past reflects worryingly in tenor the populist denigration of cosmopolitan values and scientific expertise.[6] History discovers truths and meanings that are intersubjectively communicable, not confined within self-defined fiefdoms of “situatedness” and “positionality”.

Taking Stock of Our Own

We need history more than ever, but not merely as a form of knowledge that affirms the time and place-bound relativity of all truths. The purpose of recasting empathy in the historical methodology of contextualism consists in showing that history can be a form of knowledge that affirms how it was and continues to be possible to hold beliefs as true. We as history educators play into the hands of “alternative facts” rhetoric when we fail to inculcate a respect for truth arrived at through the varied, ever-evolving, imperfect, but best-available norms and practices of the historical method.

If empathy entails feeling what another person felt in the past, it is a limited undertaking. If, on the other hand, it can compel us to investigate the presuppositions that endowed past forms of life with truth and meaning, providing us in the process with a mirror for taking stock of our own, it is something history cannot do without.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Prinz, Jesse J. “Against Empathy.” Southern Journal of Philosophy 49, 1 (2011): 214–33.
  • Retz, Tyson. Empathy and History: Historical Understanding in Re-enactment, Hermeneutics and Education. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2018.

Web Resources

_____________________

 [1] “Obama to Graduates: Cultivate Empathy: ‘The World Doesn’t Just Revolve around You’”. Northwestern University Commencement Speech, 19 June 2006,
http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2006/06/barack.html (last accessed 16 September 2018).
[2] Fritz Breithaupt, “Empathy for Empathy’s Sake: Aesthetics and Everyday Empathic Sadism”, in Aleida Assmann and Ines Detmers (eds), Empathy and its Limits (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), 162; Jesse J. Prinz, “Is Empathy Necessary for Morality?” in Amy Coplan and Peter Goldie (eds), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), 211–29; Paul Bloom, Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion (New York: HarperCollins, 2016).
[3] E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class (London: Gollancz, 1963).
[4] See Tyson Retz, “At the Interface: Academic History, School History and the Philosophy of History,” Journal of Curriculum Studies 48, no. 4 (2016): 503–17.
[5] See Tyson Retz, “Why Re-enactment is Not Empathy, Once and for All,” Journal of the Philosophy of History 11, no. 3 (2017): 306–23.
[6] See Peter Seixas, foreword to Scott Alan Metzger and Lauren McArthur Harris (eds), The Wiley International Handbook of History Teaching and Learning (Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

Empathy © Pierre Phaneuf, CC-BY 2.0 via flickr.

Recommended Citation

Retz, Tyson: Against Empathy in History? In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12489.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Empathie ist zweifellos eine gute Sache, oder? Barack Obama war sicherlich dieser Meinung. Er erklärte vor und während seiner Präsidentschaft, dass Amerikas Problem weniger ein Bundesdefizit als ein Empathiedefizit” sei. Seine Botschaft an Hochschulabsolventen im ganzen Land hieß: “Kultiviert Empathie – die Welt dreht sich nicht nur um euch.”[1]

Empathie lässt uns keine Straße überqueren

Autoren auf der sogenannten dunklen Seite der Empathie sind sich weniger sicher. Fritz Breithaupt warnt davor, dass “Empathie keine geschönte Methode des glücklichen Gemeinschaftsbildung” ist – sie kann negative Gefühle gegenüber anderen wecken und die Gefühle, die sie bei anderen anregt, zu negativen Zwecken einsetzen. Jesse Prinz weist auf die Grenzen der Empathie hin, die als Antrieb für moralisches Handeln wirken soll. Während Menschen oft bereit sind, anderen zu helfen, die direkt vor ihnen leiden, überquert ein weitaus geringerer Teil von ihnen die Straße, um die gleiche Hilfe zu leisten. Wir können es für andere besser machen, wenn wir uns nicht in sie hinversetzen und vielleicht einfach durch Wut oder ein Gefühl der Ungerechtigkeit in ihren Namen handeln, wenn gegen Werte verstoßen wird, denen wir uns allgemein verpflichtet fühlen. Paul Bloom glaubt, dass Empathie eine heilige Kuh ist, die endlich geschlachtet werden sollte, um einem “rationalen Mitgefühl” Platz zu machen, das in der Lage ist, das menschliche Wohlwollen über die engen, durch sofortige Impulse bestimmten Präferenzen hinaus auszudehnen.[2]

Inwieweit gelten diese Kritikpunkte für das historische Verstehen? Folgende Frage stelle ich zu Beginn von Empathie und Geschichte, das sowohl intellektuelle wie auch die didaktische Geschichte der Empathie ergründet: Wenn Empathie uns nicht motivieren kann, eine Straße zu überqueren, wie kann sie uns dann dazu bringen, in das “fremde Land” der Vergangenheit zu reisen, bevölkert von Charakteren, deren Verständnis uns viel Arbeit abverlangt?

Grundstein der historischen Untersuchung

Empathie wurde in die Geschichtsdidaktik zwecks eines ethischen Auftrags eingeführt. So wie der berühmte englische Sozialhistoriker E.P. Thompson sich bemüht hatte, den Alltagsmenschen vor der “enormen Herablassung der Nachwelt” zu retten, so glaubten Geschichtsdidaktiker*innen, die in den 1960er und 1970er Jahren an erweiterten universitären Bildungseinrichtungen arbeiteten, mithilfe von Empathie Schüler*innen davon abhalten zu können, die Vergangenheit nach heutigen Maßstäben zu beurteilen.[3] Mit etwas Empathie könnten Schüler*innen lernen, die Geschichte weniger als einen Katalog törichten Verhaltens und mehr als eine an menschlichen Massstäben orientierte Studie vergangener Völker zu betrachten, die im Kontext von zeit- und ortsspezifischen Möglichkeiten und Grenzen handelten.

Hinter dieser pädagogischen Formulierung von Empathie stand R.G. Collingwoods Konzept des Reenactments. Zusammen mit der umfassenden Bildungs-Revolution in England, die Studierende mit gemischten akademischen Fähigkeiten unter einem Dach zusammenführte, ergab sich aus einem weitgehend piagetischen Forschungsrahmen, in dem Geschichte als ein schwieriges, nur für die akademisch Begabtesten ein geeignetes Fach definiert wurde, eine Auffassung, mit der Schüler*innen aller Altersgruppen und Talente die Grundstruktur der Disziplinen hinter den Schulfächern lernen konnten. In ihren Bemühungen, eine konzeptionelle Grundlage für das Fach Geschichte zu etablieren, sahen Geschichtsdidaktiker*innen, wie Historiker*innen das taten, was ihre Schüler*innen normalerweise nicht getan hatten: Sie drangen hinter das Äußere ein und gewannen Einblicke in historische Situationen; sie verlebendigten, belebten und erlebten die Hoffnungen, Ängste, Pläne, Wünsche, Ansichten und Absichten derjenigen wieder, die sie zu verstehen trachteten. Empathie wurde als Grundstein der Struktur der historischen Forschung gelegt mit dem Ziel, Studierenden die Bewerkstelligung dieser Aufgabe zu ermöglichen.[4]

Eine leere Form des Wissens?

Seltsam an der Verknüpfung von Collingwoods Namen mit dem Konzept der Empathie war die Tatsache, dass Collingwood den Begriff nie verwendete; ja, im Rahmen des historischen Denken lehnte er ausdrücklich alle Formen des Pyschologismus ab.[5] Für ihn verletzte jede Form des historischen Denkens, die den Unterschied zwischen Vergangenheit und Gegenwart, Subjekt und Objekt beseitigte, die wesentlich kritische Konstruktion des historischen Wissens. Obwohl er in der Theorie der “Einkapselung” behauptete, dass vergangene “Prozesse” in heutigen Prozessen enthalten sind, plädierte er unnachgiebig dafür, dass Reenactment des vergangenen Denkens diese Knoten entflechtet und die Beurteilung der Vergangenheit aus der Gegenwart aufrecht erhält. In der begehrten Transzendenz zwischen Vergangenheit und Gegenwart bot emphatisches Verständnis keinen Aussichtspunkt, von dem aus diese kritische Reflexion stattfinden konnte. Die frühen Phänomenologen äußerten eine ähnliche Kritik und betrachteten Empathie als eine leere Form des Wissens, die nichts Neues gegen das Selbst hervorbringt.

Ein wesentliches Merkmal der Hermeneutik des 20. Jahrhundert war die Bemühung um eine Entpsychologisierung der Humanwissenschaften. Hans-Georg Gadamer reagierte gegen das empathieabhängige Geschichtsbewusstsein seiner Vorfahren und formulierte stattdessen ein Konzept des historisch beeinflussten Bewusstseins, das die Vergangenheit nicht wiederherstellen, sondern in die Gegenwart integrieren wollte, indem es sich seiner Funktion als “Tradition” bewusst blieb, durch welche alles Verstehen stattfindet. Heideggers Student Gadamer stieß bei dieser Aufgabe auf Unterstützung von unwahrscheinlicher Seite: Collingwood und seine Logik von Frage und Antwort. Wenn Geschichtsdidaktiker*innen durch das Konzept der Empathie die Relevanz des historischen Kontextes betont haben, ist die von Gadamer bezeichnete Dialektik von Frage und Antwort als Mittel zur Erforschung einer Vergangenheit zu verstehen, die von aktuellen Fragen und Anliegen geleitet wird.

Collingwood und Gadamer waren zutiefst unzufrieden mit dem individualisierenden Psychologismus der empathieabhängigen Tradition des historischen Denkens. Meine Darstellung dieser Geschichte ist im Wesentlichen ein Versuch, einer bestimmten Schieflage in der Geschichtsdidaktikforschung entgegenzukommen: die Faszination für das Persönliche und Lokale auf Kosten des Gemeinsamen, Universalen und öffentlich Anfechtbaren. Ich versuche, der Geschichte eine große Perspektive zurückzugeben, die in der individualisierten Vorstellung von Empathie in der Geschichtsvermittlung fehlt. Die gegenwärtige Bedrohung liberaler Traditionen ist global, und die Sprache einer persönlichen Verwandtschaft mit der lokalen Vergangenheit spiegelt auf besorgniserregenden Weise die populistische Verunglimpfung kosmopolitischer Werte und wissenschaftliches Expertenwissen wider.[6] Die Geschichte entdeckt Wahrheiten und Bedeutsamkeiten, die intersubjektiv kommunizierbar sind, und die sich nicht durch selbstdefinierte Lehnwörter wie “Situiertheit” und “Positionalität” eingrenzen lassen.

Eigene Bestandsaufnahme

Wir brauchen Geschichte mehr denn je, aber nicht nur als eine Form des Wissens, die die zeit- und ortsgebundene Relativität aller Wahrheiten bestätigt. Der Zweck der Umgestaltung von Empathie in der historischen Methodik des Kontextualismus besteht darin, zu zeigen, dass Geschichte eine Form von Wissen sein kann, die bestätigt, wie es früher möglich war und weiterhin möglich ist, Vorstellungen als Wahrheit gelten zu lassen. Wir als Geschichtslehrer*innen spielen in die Hände der Rhetorik “alternativer Fakten”, wenn wir es nicht schaffen, einen Respekt vor der Wahrheit einzuschärfen, der anhand von der vielfältigen, sich ständig entwickelnden, unvollkommenen, aber bestverfügbaren Normen und Praktiken der historischen Methode erreicht wurde.

Wenn Empathie darauf abzielt, zu spüren, was eine andere Person in der Vergangenheit empfunden hat, dann ist es ein begrenztes Vorhaben. Wenn es uns aber dazu nötigen kann, die Vorannahmen zu erforschen, die vergangene Lebensformen mit Wahrheit und Bedeutung ausgestattet haben und uns dabei einen Spiegel vor Augen hält für unsere eigene Bestandsaufnahme, dann ist es etwas, worauf die Geschichte nicht verzichten kann.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Prinz, Jesse J. “Against Empathy.” Southern Journal of Philosophy 49, 1 (2011): 214–33.
  • Retz, Tyson. Empathy and History: Historical Understanding in Re-enactment, Hermeneutics and Education. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2018.

Webressourcen

_____________________

 [1] “Obama to Graduates: Cultivate Empathy: ‘The World Doesn’t Just Revolve around You’”. Northwestern University Commencement Speech, 19 June 2006,
http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2006/06/barack.html (last accessed 16 September 2018).
[2] Fritz Breithaupt, “Empathy for Empathy’s Sake: Aesthetics and Everyday Empathic Sadism”, in Aleida Assmann and Ines Detmers (eds), Empathy and its Limits (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), 162; Jesse J. Prinz, “Is Empathy Necessary for Morality?” in Amy Coplan and Peter Goldie (eds), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), 211–29; Paul Bloom, Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion (New York: HarperCollins, 2016).
[3] E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class (London: Gollancz, 1963).
[4] See Tyson Retz, “At the Interface: Academic History, School History and the Philosophy of History”, Journal of Curriculum Studies 48, 4 (2016), 503–17.
[5] See Tyson Retz, “Why Re-enactment is Not Empathy, Once and for All”, Journal of the Philosophy of History 11, 3 (2017), 306–23.
[6] See Peter Seixas, foreword to Scott Alan Metzger and Lauren McArthur Harris (eds), The Wiley International Handbook of History Teaching and Learning (Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Empathy © Pierre Phaneuf, CC-BY 2.0 via flickr.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Retz, Tyson: Gegen Empathie in der Geschichte? In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12489.

Translated by Katalin Morgan (katalinmorgan at gmail dot com)

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 27
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12489

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest