Public History with Tweets

Über Public History twittern

European 1914-1918 auf Twitter

Are social media capable of tackling issues that deal with the past, or do they merely constitute a series of visual icons on web pages that allow us to share what we see and read with virtual “friends”? Are these logos also promoting user-generated content and participatory culture?[1] In an attempt to answer this, we will describe the way in which the commemoration of the First World War’s centenary is dealt with on Twitter and observe how Twitter promotes both public activities with the past and the expertise of public historians online.

Social Media and Participatory Practices

Social media or social software are expanding the possibility of producing and disseminating knowledge in the field of history.[2] Social platforms represent key elements of interactions between public historians and communities. Public historians can organize and filter user-generated content and activities by collecting information, documentary material, and memories. Social media build online relationships, reinforce identities, and consolidate kinship and communities.[3] However, the ways in which local communities engage with the past made possible through Web 2.0 participatory practices[4] are not necessarily confined to involving professional actors. This can be achieved by the public directly participating in cultural enterprises within communities.[5]

Commemorating the 1917 Russian Revolution…

This year, the general public and historians worldwide – many of them from Russia – have participated in the commemoration of the centenary of the Russian February and October Revolutions of 1917.[6] The #1917LIVE Twitter project recounts the events of 1917 one hundred years later.[7] The digital world of social media relays the content of many debates, documentaries, and exhibitions which publicly remember how Russia became Soviet Russia.[8]

The events that occurred in 1917 Russia represent a part of a longer on-going remembrance dealing with the beginning of the “short twentieth century”.[9] By interpreting the way in which digital public history (DPH) projects are currently commemorating the First World War, we are able to reflect not only on the politics of memory in the present but also on how history can be used in an instrumental way. DPH projects, especially in the European Union today, are sometimes concerned with the ability to reconstruct a “useful” past for the present.[10] Indeed, the First World War is often commemorated due to the importance of the peace-keeping effect initiated by the European Union’s integration process after the Second World War.[11]

…and the First World War

So far, the First World War has been commemorated in the digital media by different cultural and institutional bodies, which have predominantly questioned the public on this conflict at a regional, national, and international scale.[12] Twitter has also been affected. The hashtags #WW1 and #WW1Centenary[13], and in France #centenaire, are popular amongst users. Several social media projects are largely concerned with how common people and their families passed through this cataclysm of destruction and death.

As is the case with Twitter accounts on the 1917 Russian Revolution, DPH projects about the First World War on Twitter are often supported by a website. The new digital Encyclopedia of the First World War[14] has its own Twitter account that informs its followers about events that happened one hundred years ago.[15] Similarly, the project Europeana 1914-1918[16] created its Twitter account as early as in 2012.[17] The relevance of Europeana’s Twitter account is highlighted by the declared goal of the project to directly engage with the public by asking them for the crowdsourcing of memories and documents.[18]

In the United States, the Twitter account of the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City represents a project which has encouraged public discussion. The account which was created in March 2011[19] helps to promote the museum, and by May 2017, it had published more than 8,446 tweets for more than 27,000 followers.[20] The Twitter account for the network of museums which forms the Imperial War Museums in Great Britain[21] was created in March 2009 and is extremely popular with more than 104,000 followers and 20,400 tweets published.[22]

Twitter and the First World War

In the United Kingdom, on the Twitter accounts of war institutions and museums, the battlefield seems to dominate as a topic. Alternatively, French accounts focus more on the life and death of soldiers. Of particular relevance are the following two national projects which contrast greatly with one another: The first was created at the University of Luxembourg with an international scope (@RealTimeWW1), whilst the second is a French project which fosters crowdsourcing activities and is dedicated to the memory of the Poilus who fell during the war (@1J1poilu).

@RealTimeWW1 represents an innovative pedagogical project. Its goal is to teach and research how common people lived in Europe during the First World War. On a daily basis, history students study the war, consult digital primary sources in archives or online, and quote them on Twitter as testimonies of what happened each day. It documents about how soldiers and civilians were affected by the war. @RealTimeWW1 publishes daily tweets about events which are not about the past but rather the present.[23]

The French project, 1 Jour – 1 Poilu,[24] aims both to establish a narrative of the French history of the war[25] and to make use of the dynamic nature of social networks for the sake of creating a national catalog of memories centering on the French soldier as an icon. This Mission du Centenaire was launched in 2013 in an effort to coordinate all commemorative activities regarding the First World War.[26] It is related to Mémoire des Hommes, an ambitious public project of the French Defence Ministry.[27] 1 Jour – 1 Poilu “unites the energies of everyday internet users to create a full transcript of 1,325,290 records dedicated to the memories of those who died for France.”[28]

If we are to draw conclusions about Twitter’s role in the commemoration of the First World War, we may acknowledge the following: as a result of Twitter, witnesses speak directly in the first person – often through a re-enactment of the past or an oral account – and indirectly – through links to autobiographies, personal diaries and other ego-documents.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Bost, Mélanie, and Chantal Kesteloot. “Les commémorations du centenaire de la Première Guerre mondiale.” Courrier hebdomadaire du CRISP 30‑31 (2014): 5‑63.
  • Clavert, Frédéric. “1 Jour – 1 Poilu: Exemple De Contribution Des ‘Amateurs’ à la Narration de L’histoire,” L’histoire contemporaine à l’ère numérique, December 7, 2015, https://histnum.hypotheses.org/2528 (last accessed 14 June 2017).
  • Fuchs, Christian. Social Media: A Critical Introduction. 2nd edition. London: Sage, 2017.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] For a critical approach to participatory culture see Christian Fuchs, Social Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd ed. (London: Sage, 2017), 65-84.
[2] Tatjana Takseva, ed., Social Software and the Evolution of User Expertise: Future Trends in Knowledge Creation and Dissemination (Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference, 2013).
[3] Stéphane Levesque, “Should History Promote National Identification?” Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 10, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-8533.
[4] Serge Noiret, “Digital History 2.0,” in Contemporary History in the Digital Age, eds. Frédéric Clavert and Serge Noiret (Brussels: Peter Lang, 2013), 155-190.
[5] See Alessandro Bessi, Mauro Coletto, George Alexandru Davidescu, Antonio Scala, Guido Caldarelli, and Walter Quattrociocchi, “Science vs Conspiracy. Collective Narratives in the Age of Misinformation,” PLoS ONE 10/2 (2015), DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118093.
[6] On the memory turn in Russia, see Alexander Khodnev, “Memory Studies ‘Boom’ in Russia,” Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 11, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5767.
[7] “‘Digital time travel! Best thing on Twitter!’ People praise ‘highly addictive’ #1917LIVE revolution,” RT Question More, March 18, 2017, https://www.rt.com/viral/381264-rt-1917-revolution-twitter-reenactment/ (last accessed 7 June 2017).
[8] Examples are Twitter accounts “The Russian Telegraph” (@RT_1917) with more than 31,000 followers in May 2017; “Tweets from 1917” (@1917Bolshevik) with ca. 4,000 followers; “Russian Revolution” (@rusrev1917) with ca. 850 followers; and “Russia in Revolution” (@revoltingrussia) with ca. 1,900 followers.
[9] An attempt to describe the many ways in whicheach EU country and Europe as a whole have started commemorating the First World War in 2014 has been made by Mélanie Bost and Chantal Kesteloot. See Mélanie Bost and Chantal Kesteloot, “Les commémorations du centenaire de la Première Guerre mondiale,” Courrier hebdomadaire du CRISP 30‑31 (2014), 5‑63; Mélanie Bost and Chantal Kesteloot, “Le Centenaire de la Grande Guerre en Belgique: Itinéraire au sein d’un paysage commémoratif fragmenté,” Observatoire du Centenaire, Université de Paris 1 (2016), https://www.univ-paris1.fr/fileadmin/IGPS/observatoire-du-centenaire/Bost_et_Kesteloot_-_Belgique.pdf (last accessed 14 June 2017); and Chantal Kesteloot, “Towards Public History: World Wars Representations and Commemorations in Belgium,” Memoria e Ricerca 1 (2017), 41-60.
[10] Ireneusz P. Karolewski, “Narratives of European Union,” Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 43, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7979; Serge Noiret, “Public history as ‘useful history’ before voting for Europe, May 22-25, 2014,” Digital and Public History, May 19, 2014, https://dph.hypotheses.org/380 (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[11] On identity issues in the EU today, see Bo Stråth, “A European identity: To the historical limits of a concept,” European Journal of Social Theory 5/4 (2002), 387-401; Sharon Mcdonald, Memorylands: Heritage and identity in Europe today (London: Routledge, 2013); Chiara Bottici and Benoit Challand, Imagining Europe: myth, memory and identity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).
[12] See “WWI Websites,” 1914-1918 Online: The International Encyclopedia of the First World War http://www.1914-1918-online.net/06_WWI_websites/index.html (last accessed 14 June 2017). See also the presentation by Enrico Natale during the 1st conference of the IFPH-FIHP at the University of Amsterdam, October 23-25, 2014, with the title “The Digital Public History of WWI in Europe”. Further information on http://ifph.hypotheses.org/267 (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[13] “#WW1,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/hashtag/WW1?src=hash (last accessed 14 June 2017) and “#WW1Centenary,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/hashtag/WW1Centenary?src=hash (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[14] 1914-1918 Online: International Encyclopedia of the First World War, http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/home.html (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[15] “1914-1918-online,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/19141918online (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[16] Europeana 1914-1918, http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/ (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[17] “Europeana 1914-1918,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/Europeana1914 (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[18] “The ‘Europeana 1914-1918’ project aims to collect and share material that relates to the Great War (1914-1918) and those involved in or affected by it.” http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/ (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[19] “National WWI Museum,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/TheWWImuseum (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[20] National World War I Museum and Memorial, https://www.theworldwar.org/ (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[21] Imperial War Museums, http://www.iwm.org.uk/ (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[22] “Imperial War Museums,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/I_W_M (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[23] “Tweets from WWI,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/RealTimeWW1 (last accessed 14 June 2017). For the presentation of the project, see “”World War One goes Twitter,” H-Europe, http://h-europe.uni.lu/?page_id=621 (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[24] “1 Jour – 1 Poilu,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/1J1Poilu (last accessed 14 June 2017). Also see the website http://www.1jour1poilu.com (last accessed 14 June 2017) and Jean-Michel Gilot, “Le digital au service d’une cause nationale: l’odyssée d”1 Jour – 1 Poilu’,” LinkedIn, November 26, 2015, https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/le-digital-au-service-dune-cause-nationale-lodyss%C3%A9e-d-gilot (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[25] Frédéric Clavert, “1 Jour – 1 Poilu: Exemple De Contribution Des ‘Amateurs’ à la Narration de L’histoire,” L’histoire contemporaine à l’ère numérique, December 7, 2015, https://histnum.hypotheses.org/2528 (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[26] “Mission Centenaire,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/mission1418 (last accessed 14 June 2017). The mission in Twitter uses the official hashtag #Centenaire and supports the website project Mission Centenaire 14-18, http://centenaire.org (last accessed 14 June 2017).
[27] Mémoire des Hommes, http://www.memoiredeshommes.sga.defense.gouv.fr/fr/ (last accessed 14 June 2017). The project wants to foster a collaborative digital transcription of all the hand-written records of the Poilus conserved in the Defence Ministry.
[28] 1 Jour – 1 Poilu, http://www.1jour1poilu.com/ (last accessed 14 June 2017).

_____________________

Image Credits
Europeana 1914-1918 on Twitter (last accessed 21 June 2017).

Recommended Citation
Noiret, Serge: Public History with Tweets. In: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 24, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9568.

Editorial Responsibility
Judith Breitfuß / Thomas Hellmuth

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Sind die sozialen Medien dazu geeignet, Themen, die sich mit der Vergangenheit auseinandersetzen, zu bewältigen? Oder stellen sie lediglich eine Serie an Piktogrammen auf Internetseiten dar, die es uns ermöglichen, was wir sehen und lesen mit einer ausgewählten Gruppe an virtuellen “FreundInnen” zu teilen? Kann es sein, dass wir diese Logos auch als ein Portal wahrnehmen, welches nutzerInnengenerierte Inhalte und partizipatorische Kultur fördert?[1] In einem Versuch, diese Fragen zu beantworten, werden wir die Art und Weise, wie das 100-jährige Gedenken an den Ersten Weltkrieg auf Twitter behandelt wird, beschreiben. Zudem werden wir aufzeigen, wie Twitter sowohl öffentliche Aktivitäten, die sich mit der Vergangenheit befassen, als auch das Fachwissen von Public Historians im Internet fördert.

Soziale Medien und partizipatorische Praktiken

Soziale Medien und soziale Software erweitern die Möglichkeiten, historisches Wissen herzustellen und zu vermitteln.[2] Soziale Plattformen bilden Schlüsselelemente in der Interaktion zwischen HistorikerInnen und Gemeinschaften. Public Historians können nutzergenerierte Inhalte und Aktivitäten organisieren und filtern, indem Informationen, Erfahrungsberichte, Dokumentationsmaterial und geteilte Erinnerungen unter NutzerInnen gesammelt werden. Soziale Medien bilden Online-Beziehungen, sie kräftigen Identitäten, und sie stärken Familien und Gemeinschaften.[3] Die Art und Weise, in der sich lokale Gemeinschaften über das Web 2.0 mit der Vergangenheit beschäftigen,[4] ist jedoch nicht notwendigerweise auf die Beteiligung professioneller AkteurInnen angewiesen. Denn die Öffentlichkeit kann sich auch direkt an kulturellen Projekten innerhalb von Gemeinschaften beteiligen.[5]

Das Gedenken an die Russische Revolution 1917…

Dieses Jahr haben die breite Öffentlichkeit und HistorikerInnen weltweit – viele von ihnen aus Russland – am hundertjährigen Gedenken an die russischen Februar- und Oktoberrevolutionen von 1917 teilgenommen.[6] Das Twitter-Projekt #1917LIVE stellt die Ereignisse von 1917 einhundert Jahre später auf Twitter nach.[7] Die digitale Welt sozialer Medien übermittelt den Inhalt zahlreicher Debatten, Dokumentationen und Ausstellungen, die öffentlich daran erinnern, wie aus Russland Sowjetrussland wurde.[8]

Die Ereignisse, die 1917 in Russland stattfanden, stellen einen Teil eines länger andauernden Gedenkens dar, das sich mit dem Beginn des “kurzen 20. Jahrhunderts” auseinandersetzt.[9] Durch die Interpretation der Art und Weise, wie digitale Public-History-Projekte (DPH-Projekte) dem Ersten Weltkrieg gedenken, können wir nicht nur über die Erinnerungspolitik der Gegenwart, sondern auch darüber reflektieren, wie Geschichte als Instrument genutzt werden kann. DPH-Projekte, besonders in der heutigen Europäischen Union, befassen sich manchmal damit, eine “nützliche” Vergangenheit für die Gegenwart zu rekonstruieren.[10] Tatsächlich wird des Ersten Weltkriegs vor allem deshalb gedacht, um auf die Bedeutung der Friedenssicherung durch den europäischen Integrationsprozess nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg aufmerksam zu machen.[11]

…und an den Ersten Weltkrieg

Bis dato ist dem Ersten Weltkrieg in den digitalen Medien von verschiedenen kulturellen Akteuren und Institutionen gedacht worden, die den regionalen, nationalen und internationalen Öffentlichkeiten Fragen zu diesem spezifischen Konflikt gestellt haben.[12] Twitter war ebenfalls betroffen. Die Hashtags #WW1 und #WW1Centenary[13] (und #centenaire in Frankreich) sind bei NutzerInnen sehr beliebt. Zahlreiche dieser Projekte in den sozialen Medien befassen sich größtenteils mit dem Leben einfacher Leute und deren Familien und damit, wie sie diese katastrophale Zeit der Zerstörung und des Todes durchlebt haben.

Wie die Twitter-Accounts zur Russischen Revolution 1917 ebenfalls belegen, werden DPH-Projekte über den Ersten Weltkrieg auf Twitter oft von Internetseiten oder speziellen digitalen Publikationen unterstützt. Die neue digitale Encyclopedia of the First World War[14] hat ihren eigenen Twitter-Account, der ihre Follower über Ereignisse, die vor einhundert Jahren stattfanden, informiert.[15] In ähnlicher Weise erstellte das Projekt Europeana 1914–1918[16] seinen Twitter-Account bereits 2012.[17] Die Relevanz des Europeana-Twitter-Accounts zeigt sich durch das dezidiert ausgewiesene Ziel des Projekts, direkt mit der Öffentlichkeit in Verbindung zu treten, indem diese um das Crowdsourcing von Erinnerungen und Dokumenten gebeten wird.[18]

In den Vereinigten Staaten ist der Twitter-Account des National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City ein Projekt, das zur öffentlichen Diskussion einlädt. Der Account, der im März 2011 erstellt wurde,[19] dient unter anderem der Werbung für das Museum und veröffentlichte bis Mai 2017 mehr als 8.446 Tweets an mehr als 27.000 Follower.[20] Der Twitter-Account des Museumsnetzwerks, das die Imperial War Museums in Großbritannien bildet,[21] wurde im März 2009 erstellt und ist mit mehr als 104.000 Followern und 20.400 veröffentlichten Tweets ebenfalls äußerst beliebt.[22]

Twitter und der Erste Weltkrieg

Im Vereinigten Königreich scheint auf den Twitter-Accounts von Kriegsinstitutionen und Museen das Schlachtfeld als Thema zu dominieren. Einen alternativen Ansatz wählte Frankreich, wo sich die Accounts vorwiegend dem Leben und Tod der Soldaten widmen. Von spezieller Relevanz sind zwei nationale Projekte, die sich maßgeblich voneinander unterscheiden: Das eine wurde an der Universität Luxemburg in internationalem Umfang entwickelt (@RealTimeWW1). Das andere ist ein französisches Projekt, das Crowdsourcing-Aktivitäten fördert und der Erinnerung an die im Krieg gefallenen Poilus gewidmet ist (@1J1poilu).

@RealTimeWW1 ist ein innovatives pädagogisches Projekt. Sein Ziel ist es, zu lehren und zu erforschen, wie einfache Menschen in Europa während des Ersten Weltkriegs lebten. Täglich studieren GeschichtsstudentInnen den Krieg, konsultieren digitale Primärquellen in Archiven oder im Internet und veröffentlichen ihre Ergebnisse auf Twitter. Es werden so ZeitzeugInnenberichte erstellt, die jeden Tag des Krieges dokumentieren und belegen, wie Soldaten und ZivilistInnen vom Krieg betroffen waren. @RealTimeWW1 veröffentlicht täglich Tweets von Ereignissen, die nicht von der Vergangenheit, sondern auch von der Gegenwart handeln.[23]

Das französische Projekt, 1 Jour – 1 Poilu,[24] versucht eine französische Erzählweise der Kriegsgeschichte zu etablieren.[25] Die Dynamik von sozialen Netzwerken soll genutzt werden, um einen Nationalkatalog von Erinnerungen zusammenzutragen, der sich mit dem französischen Soldaten als Symbol befasst. Diese Mission du Centenaire entstand 2013 in dem Bestreben, alle Gedenkinitiativen zum Ersten Weltkrieg zu koordinieren.[26] Es hat ein ähnliches Konzept wie Mémoire des Hommes, ein ambitioniertes öffentliches Projekt des französischen Verteidigungsministeriums.[27] 1 Jour – 1 Poilu “vereint die Energien von täglichen InternetnutzerInnen, um eine vollständige Transkription von 1.325.290 Aufzeichnungen zu erstellen, die der Erinnerung jener, die für Frankreich ihr Leben ließen, gewidmet ist.”[28]

Wenn wir Schlussfolgerungen über die Rolle von Twitter im Gedenken an den Ersten Weltkrieg ziehen wollen, können wir Folgendes feststellen: Durch Twitter können ZeitzeugInnen sowohl direkt in der ersten Person (oft durch die Nachstellung der Vergangenheit oder durch mündliche Erzählungen) als auch indirekt (durch Verweise auf Autobiographien, persönliche Tagebücher und weitere Egodokumente) zu uns sprechen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Mélanie Bost / Chantal Kesteloot: Les commémorations du centenaire de la Première Guerre mondiale. In: Courrier hebdomadaire du CRISP 30/31 (2014), S. 5-63.
  • Frédéric Clavert: 1 Jour – 1 Poilu. Exemple De Contribution Des “Amateurs” à la Narration de L’histoire. In: L’histoire contemporaine à l’ère numérique, 7. Dezember 2015, https://histnum.hypotheses.org/2528 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
  • Christian Fuchs: Social Media. A Critical Introduction. 2. Auflage. London 2017.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Für einen kritischen Ansatz zur partizipatorischen Kultur siehe Christian Fuchs: Social Media. A Critical Introduction. 2. Auflage. London 2017, S. 65-84.
[2] Tatjana Takseva (Hrsg.): Social Software and the Evolution of User Expertise. Future Trends in Knowledge Creation and Dissemination. Hershey 2013.
[3] Stéphane Levesque: Soll Geschichte die nationale Identifikation fördern? In: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 10, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-8533 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[4] Serge Noiret: Digital History 2.0. In: Frédéric Clavert/Serge Noiret (Hrsg.): Contemporary History in the Digital Age. Brüssel 2013, S. 155-190.
[5] Für mehr Informationen, siehe Alessandro Bessi/Mauro Coletto/George Alexandru Davidescu/Antonio Scala/Guido Caldarelli/Walter Quattrociocchi: Science vs Conspiracy. Collective Narratives in the Age of Misinformation. In: PLoS ONE 10/2 (2015), DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0118093 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[6] Um mehr über Russland und seine Erinnerungskultur zu erfahren, siehe Alexander Khodnev: “Boom” der Gedächtnis-Studien in Russland. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 11, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5767 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[7] [o.A.]: Digital time travel! Best thing on Twitter! People praise “highly addictive” #1917LIVE revolution. In: RT Question More vom 18. März 2017, https://www.rt.com/viral/381264-rt-1917-revolution-twitter-reenactment/ (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[8] Beispiele sind die Twitter-Accounts “The Russian Telegraph” (@RT_1917) mit mehr als 31.000 Followern im Mai 2017; “Tweets from 1917” (@1917Bolshevik) mit ca. 4.000 Followern; “Russian Revolution” (@rusrev1917) mit ca. 850 Followern; und “Russia in Revolution” (@revoltingrussia) mit ca. 1.900 Followern.
[9] Ein Versuch, die zahlreichen Arten zu beschreiben, in denen die Mitgliedsländer der Europäischen Union sowie Europa als Ganzes anfingen, dem Ersten Weltkrieg seit dem Jahr 2014 zu gedenken, wurde von Mélanie Bost und Chantal Kesteloot unternommen. Vgl. Mélanie Bost/Chantal Kesteloot: Les commémorations du centenaire de la Première Guerre mondiale. In: Courrier hebdomadaire du CRISP 30/31 (2014), S. 5-63; Mélanie Bost/Chantal Kesteloot: Le Centenaire de la Grande Guerre en Belgique. Itinéraire au sein d’un paysage commémoratif fragmenté. Paris 2016, https://www.univ-paris1.fr/fileadmin/IGPS/observatoire-du-centenaire/Bost_et_Kesteloot_-_Belgique.pdf (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017); und Chantal Kesteloot: Towards Public History. World Wars Representations and Commemorations in Belgium. In: Memoria e Ricerca 1 (2017), S. 41-60.
[10] Ireneusz P. Karolewski: Die Narrative der Europäischen Union. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 43, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7979; Serge Noiret: Public history as “useful history” before voting for Europe. In: Digital and Public History vom 19. Mai 2014, https://dph.hypotheses.org/380 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[11] Für mehr Informationen zu Identitätsfragen innerhalb der heutigen Europäischen Union, siehe Bo Stråth: A European identity. To the historical limits of a concept. In: European Journal of Social Theory 5/4 (2002), S. 387-401; Sharon Mcdonald: Memorylands. Heritage and identity in Europe today. London 2013; Chiara Bottici/Benoit Challand: Imagining Europe. Myth, memory and identity. Cambridge 2013.
[12] Für mehr Informationen, siehe “WWI Websites”. In: 1914-1918 Online. The International Encyclopedia of the First World War, http://www.1914-1918-online.net/06_WWI_websites/index.html (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
Ebenfalls empfehlenswert ist der Vortrag von Enrico Natale, den er im Rahmen der ersten Konferenz der IFPH-FIHP vom 23. Bis 25. Oktober 2014 an der Universität von Amsterdam unter dem Titel “The Digital Public History of WWI in Europe” hielt. Mehr Informationen auf http://ifph.hypotheses.org/267 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[13] “#WW1,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/hashtag/WW1?src=hash (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017) und “#WW1 Centenary,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/hashtag/WW1Centenary?src=hash (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[14] 1914-1918 Online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War, http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/home.html (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[15] “1914-1918-online,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/19141918online (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[16] Europeana 1914-1918, http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/ (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[17] “Europeana 1914-1918,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/Europeana1914 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[18] “Das ‘Europeana 1914-1918’-Projekt zielt darauf ab, Material über den Großen Krieg (1914-1918) und jene, die daran beteiligt oder davon betroffen waren, zu sammeln und zu teilen.” http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/ (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[19] “National WWI Museum,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/TheWWImuseum (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[20] National World War I Museum and Memorial, https://www.theworldwar.org/ (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[21] Imperial War Museums, http://www.iwm.org.uk/ (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[22] “Imperial War Museums,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/I_W_M (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[23] “Tweets from WWI,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/RealTimeWW1 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017). Für weitere Informationen zum Projekt, siehe [o.A.]: World War One goes Twitter. In: H-Europe, http://h-europe.uni.lu/?page_id=621 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[24] “1 Jour – 1 Poilu,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/1J1Poilu (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017). Siehe auch die Website http://www.1jour1poilu.com (letzter Zugriff 06.06.2017) sowie Jean-Michel Gilot: Le digital au service d’une cause nationale. L’odyssée d’ “1 Jour – 1 Poilu”. In: LinkedIn, 26. November 2015, https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/le-digital-au-service-dune-cause-nationale-lodyss%C3%A9e-d-gilot  (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[25] Frédéric Clavert: 1 Jour – 1 Poilu. Exemple De Contribution Des “Amateurs” à la Narration de L’histoire. In: L’histoire contemporaine à l’ère numérique, 7. Dezember 2015,  https://histnum.hypotheses.org/2528 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[26] “Mission Centenaire,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/mission1418 (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017). Dieses Twitter-Projekt verwendet den Hashtag #Centenaire und unterstützt die Website “Mission Centenaire 14-18”, http://centenaire.org (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).
[27] Mémoire des Hommes,  http://www.memoiredeshommes.sga.defense.gouv.fr/fr/ (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017). Das Projekt möchte eine gemeinschaftliche digitale Transkription aller handschriftlichen Aufzeichnungen der Poilus, die im Verteidigungsministerium aufbewahrt werden, fördern.
[28] 1 Jour – 1 Poilu, http://www.1jour1poilu.com/ (letzter Zugriff: 06.06.2017).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Europeana 1914-1918 on Twitter (letzter Zugriff: 21.06.2017).

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Noiret, Serge: Über Public History twittern. In: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 24, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9568.

Translated by Stefanie Svacina and Paul Jones (paul.stefanie@outlook.at)

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Judith Breitfuß / Thomas Hellmuth

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 5 (2017) 24
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9568

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Pin It on Pinterest