“Reenactment” – Dangerous Fun?

“Reenactement” – Gefährlicher Spaß?


Reenactment – namely the restaging of historical events in the most authentic way possible[1] – fascinates people! Organizers regularly announce record-breaking numbers of visitors. Reenactment groups that would like to take part in a certain event often have to be turned away: the program is already booked out or the “play area” is too small. Where does the attractiveness of such events come from? Do warlike stagings, in particular, entice visitors? And does this still have anything to do with history at all?

 

 

“Convoy to remember”

“Of course, this is history”, many reenactment organizers and groups claim. Adrian Gerwer, the president of the organizing committee of the “Convoy to Remember”[2] event that, according to a media text, has developed from a mini to a mega event in the last 20 years, points out: “With this military old-timer meeting, we want to remind people of the fact that, on 6 June 1944, liberation from the scourge of National Socialism began with the landing of troops in Normandy”.[3] And thus – according to the organizers’ announcement on their website – for the first time ever in Switzerland, “a US airfield in warlike live operation” is on show. “An original 1944 Stinson L-5 takes off and lands again on the festival grounds. In parallel, a camp of the US army air corps for military pilots has been reconstructed in its original size – a highlight!”[4]

The reenactor groups that have assigned places on the festival grounds are named “Big Red One Living History Organization”,[5] Fox Co, 2nd Battalion, 502nd PIR, 101st Airborne[6] or Klondikes.[7] On their website, the Klondikes write,

“Military reenactment is a kind of ‘interactive history teaching’ for the participants as well as for the audience. But contrary to history textbooks or movies, reenactment tries to offer first-hand experiences (…). If you, in fact, ever wanted to know how soldiers experienced the Second World War, then come along and watch the restaging of these historical events or living history on the topic.”[8]

Military reenactment as an amusement?

Exactly what effect such restaging of living history has was reported by the Brugger Gazette, following an event that took place in 2013:

“There was pure merriment, here and there even joyful exuberance (…). There was waving and laughing, there were military greetings in a dead serious, correct, martial, brisk way. As different as people are, so differently do they act out the Convoy – to the amusement of the spectators!”[9]

The laughter, however, seems to have got stuck in the throats of some reenactors and spectators: “Napoleon”, for example, reported in the “Forum for Living History”: “The DLI will quite certainly not take part in a Convoy anymore because, when it comes to drunk people in uniform threatening other actors with weapons, then we have to stop.”[10] And “Cantarella” replies, “I fully endorse this. I don’t want to even start talking about a spectator (in plain clothes, not in uniform) who greeted me by saying ‘Heil Hitler.’”[11]

Oh! Is reenactment of acts of war then dangerous fun? Do such events about the Second World War invite the audience to openly express their Fascist ideology? Is war transfigured and even glorified? Does reenactment give a totally distorted picture of past events? And do reenactment events open doors to indoctrination and overpowering, instead of providing “interactive history teaching”?[12]

History for entertainment – what about education?

A glance at the framework program of “Convoy to remember” reveals that military reenactment is part of its extensive entertainment program. Thus, the Patrouille Suisse flies overhead, thereby doubtlessly providing a great air show, but this has as little to do with the landing in Normandy, as does the ‘Oktoberfest’ music band, “Münchner Zwietracht”, which performs as the main act in the festival tent in the evening.

This fact does not really come as a surprise. History has always served, and still, also today, serves the purpose of entertainment. Thus, the new Swiss German Curriculum 21 even states, “The students can make use of history for education and entertainment.”[13] This formulation is actually good. Entertainment only is not enough; also not within the context of reenactment. It does not pose a problem if people simply amuse themselves with history during a reenactment show, a school history lesson, or a historical movie. It first becomes a problem when attitudes – for instance, political or religious ones – are subtly transferred and conveyed that people adopt without reflecting much on them.[14] This form of entertainment based on history also becomes a problem at the moment when the view of the present and the future is thereby permanently distorted. Therefore, critical thinking is crucial when dealing with history. Critical thinking ensures education. Students can learn to think critically if they are taught well. Such critical thinking is promoted, thanks to free media, in open societies. Critical thinking liberates people from the captivity of their present and opens up their view of the future and the past. They thus become curious about history.

Creating curiosity about history!

Can this be done with military reenactment? Do the reenactors and spectators really ask themselves how people lived in France at the time when the allies landed in Normandy? What exactly did the soldiers experience while landing? How did the advance right across Europe take place? What war crimes occurred in the environment of the Convoy?
These are facts that many of them simply do not want to know. “We do not have the least interest in war, but we are really interested in the technology, the joy, the exchange among colleagues worldwide”, Pius Länzlinger, participant in the Convoy to Remember 2016, explains to Swiss Television.[15] To hold old objects from the past in one’s hands, or to watch reenactments, does not automatically contribute to either becoming curious about history or to acquiring a better understanding of history.

This might occur more successfully during experimental role-playing with cultural techniques or when experiencing everyday life situations from other times, rather than during military reenactments.[16] And one might also better succeed in this if reenactors simply stage history for themselves, without any audience. Good reenactment groups, however, succeed in making their audience ask questions about demanding military issues as well, be it by explicitly inviting them to bring up questions, be it by reenacting well-chosen scenes several times and in different ways and, by this, irritating and provoking the spectators. Either way, reenactment could have great potential to increase the curiosity of the participants and, thus, create one of the most important preconditions for historical learning and for education. It is simply a pity that this opportunity is often wasted.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Daugbjerg, Mads, Rivka Syd Eisner and Britta Timm Knudsen (eds.): Re-Enacting the Past. Heritage, materiality and performance.  London: Routledge, 2015.
  • Sénécheau, Miriam, and Stefanie Samida: Living History als Gegenstand Historischen Lernens. Begriffe – Problemfelder – Materialien. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 2015.
  • Willner, Sarah, Georg Koch and Stefanie Samida (eds.): Doing History. Performative Praktiken in der Geschichtskultur. (Edition Historische Kulturwissenschaften 1). Münster: Waxmann, 2016.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] See on “Reenactment” e.g. Reenacting History: Braun, Micha; Heeg, Günther; Krüger, Lars; Schäfer, Helmut (Eds.): Reenacting History: Theater & Geschichte. Berlin: Theater der Zeit, 2014. See also the Wikipedia contributions on the same keyword “Reenactment“ in different languages. It, for example, seems interesting to me that in the English-language contribution already in the first sentence the attention is drawn to the educational and entertaining aspect of reenactment: “Historical reenactment (or re-enactment) is an educational or entertainment activity in which people follow a plan to recreate aspects of a historical event or period.“ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_reenactment; last accessed 6 August 2016)
[2] On the website of the Association you find the program of the event as well as, for example, the goals and, of course, a series of photos and media reports about the event: http://www.convoytoremember.com/23-0-Home.html (accessed 6  August 2016).
[3] Quoted from: General-Anzeiger; The regional paper for the district of Brugg and adjoining municipalities; No 33 of 15 August 2013; p. 1; online at http://www.convoytoremember.com/files/rundschaunord_kw_31.pdf (accessed 6 August 2016).
[4] http://www.convoytoremember.com/23-0-Home.html (last accessed 6.8.2016). Due to this self-advertising many question should, of course, be asked: Can one and is one allowed to re-experience a situation in which soldiers permanently had to face death on festival grounds at all? And what exactly is it that one is reminded of in connection with this “Convoy”? Also of the fact that the Germans treated the civilian population with ruthless severity immediately after the invasion and in Oradour-sur-Glane e.g. massacred 640 villagers? Or does it remind of the fact that the liberated French people shot dead and lynched thousands of collaborators?
[5] http://www.big-red-one.org/ (last accessed 6 August 2016).
[6] http://fox502nd.weebly.com/ (last accessed 6 August 2016).
[7] http://www.klondikes.nl/reenactment/ (last accessed 6 August 2016).
[8] Ibid.
[9] Like footnote 3, p. 14.
[10] http://lebendige-geschichte.ch/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=5916, posted on 12 August 2013 at 06:56 (last accessed 6.8.2016).
[11] Ibid., posted on 12 August 2013 at at 07.32 (last accessed 6 August 2016).
[12] Like footnote 7.
[13] Curriculum 21, Subject area: Spaces, Times and Societies (with geography and history), competence 7.2; online at http://v-ef.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=b|6|4&la=yes (last accessed 6 August 2016).
[14] Attitudes are thus adopted by means of “communicative persuasion” on a peripheral way. Cf. also e.g.: Gautschi, Peter (2008): Der Beitrag des Geschichtsunterrichts zur Entwicklung von Einstellungen. In: Bauer, Jan-Patrick; Meyer-Hamme, Johannes; Körber, Andreas (Eds.): Geschichtslernen – Innovationen und Reflexionen. Geschichtsdidaktik im Spannungsfeld von theoretischen Zuspitzungen, empirischen Erkundungen, normativen Überlegungen und pragmatischen Wendungen – Festschrift für Bodo von Borries zum 65. Geburtstag. Kenzingen: Centaurus (Reihe Geschichte; 54), p. 289 – 306. Here p. 291.
[15] Contribution “Military Oldtimer Meeting in Aargau” in the main edition of the news program of Swiss Television of 13 August 2016, online at http://www.srf.ch/play/tv/tagesschau/video/militaer-oldtimer-treffen-im-aargau?id=11f4958e-3f58-4119-a887-4cc46054b564 (last accessed 14.8.2016).
[16] Also here there are, of course, good and less good examples: What nonsense when students craft the imperial insignia of the Holy Roman Empire. Cf. also Pandel, Hans-Jürgen (1999): Postmoderne Beliebigkeit? In: Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht, Vol. 50 (1999), p. 282–291. Here all that is offered in the Roman adventure park in Windisch seems to be much better to me. Cf. also https://www.ag.ch/de/bks/kultur/museen_schloesser/legionaerspfad/ legionaerspfad.jsp (last accessed 6 August 2016).

_____________________

Image Credits
The restaging of historical events is fascinating actors and spectators. Photography by Louis Dreyer, © MACH Corporate & Werbung, Rütistrasse 3a, CH-5401 Baden.

Recommended Citation
Gautschi, Peter: “Reenactment” – Dangerous Fun? In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 30, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6873.

Editorial Responsibility
Marco Zerwas / Marko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Reenactment – also die Neuinszenierung geschichtlicher Ereignisse in möglichst authentischer Weise[1] – fasziniert! Veranstalter melden regelmäßig Rekord-BesucherInnenzahlen. Sie müssen oftmals Reenactment-Gruppen, die gerne an einer bestimmten Veranstaltung teilnehmen würden, abweisen: Das Programm ist schon voll oder das “Spielgelände” zu klein. Woher kommt die Attraktivität solcher Anlässe? Sind es insbesondere kriegerische Inszenierungen, die anlocken? Und hat das überhaupt noch etwas mit Geschichte zu tun?

“Convoy to remember”

“Klar ist das Geschichte!” behaupten viele Reenactment-Veranstalter und -Gruppen. Adrian Gerwer, der Präsident des Organisationskomitees der Veranstaltung “Convoy to remember”,[2] die sich gemäss Medientext in den letzten 20 Jahren vom Mini- zum Mega-Event entwickelt hat, hält fest: “Wir wollen mit diesem Militär-Oldtimer-Treffen daran erinnern, dass mit der Landung der alliierten Truppen in der Normandie am 6. Juni 1944 die Befreiung von der Geißel des Nationalsozialismus ihren Anfang nahm.”[3] Und so wird denn – gemäss Ankündigung der Organisatoren auf ihrer Website – erstmals in der Schweiz “ein US-Airfield im kriegsmäßigen Echtbetrieb” gezeigt. “Nach dem Vorbild der US Army Air Force von 1944 landet und startet ein Originalflugzeug Stinson L-5 aus dieser Epoche beim Festgelände. Parallel dazu wird am Boden die damals übliche Bewachung sowie das Pilotencamp 1:1 aufgebaut – ein Highlight!”[4]

Die Reenactor-Gruppen, die auf dem Festgelände zugewiesene Plätze haben, heissen “Big Red One Living History Organization”[5], Fox Co, 2nd Battalion, 502nd PIR, 101st Airborne[6] oder Klondikes[7]. Auf deren Website liest man dann:

“Militärisches Reenactment ist eine Art von ‘interaktivem Geschichtsunterricht’ sowohl für die Teilnehmenden als auch für die ZuschauerInnen. Aber anders als in Geschichtsbüchern oder in Spielfilmen versucht Reenactment, Erfahrungen aus erster Hand zu bieten (…). Wenn Sie also jemals wissen wollten, wie die Soldaten den Zweiten Weltkrieg erlebt haben, dann kommen und sehen Sie selbst die Neuinszenierung dieser geschichtlichen Ereignisse oder Living History zum Thema.”[8]

Militärisches Reenactment zur Erheiterung?

Was genau solche Nachstellungen lebendiger Geschichte bewirken, das berichtete der Brugger Anzeiger nach der Durchführung im Jahr 2013:

“Da herrschte Heiterkeit pur, da und dort gar Ausgelassenheit (…). Es wurde gewinkt und gelacht, es wurde aber auch militärisch-todernst gegrüßt, korrekt, stramm, zackig. So verschieden die Menschen sind, so verschieden leben sie den Convoy – zur Erheiterung der Zuschauer!”[9]

Allerdings scheint einigen Reenactors und ZuschauerInnen das Lachen im Hals stecken geblieben zu sein: “Napoleon” etwa berichtete im “Forum für lebendige Geschichte”: “Die DLI wird sich ziemlich sicher nicht mehr an einem Convoy beteiligen, denn wenn wir so weit sind, dass besoffene Leute in Uniform andere Darsteller mit Waffen bedrohen, dann müssen wir aufhören.”[10] Und “cantarella” antwortete darauf: “Das unterschreibe ich. Vom Besucher (in Zivil, kein Uniformierter), der mich mit ‘Heil Hitler’ ansprach, will ich gar nicht erst anfangen.”[11]

Oha! Ist Reenactment von Kriegsereignissen also ein gefährlicher Spaß? Laden solche Veranstaltungen zum Zweiten Weltkrieg die Zuschauer ein, ihre faschistische Gesinnung offen zu äußern? Wird Krieg verklärt oder gar verherrlicht? Gibt Reenactment nicht ein völlig schräges Bild von vergangenen Ereignissen? Und öffnen Reenactment-Veranstaltungen der Indoktrination und Überwältigung nicht Tür und Tor statt “interaktiven Geschichtsunterricht”[12] zu bieten?

Geschichte zur Unterhaltung – und die Bildung?

Dass das militärische Reenactment bei “Convoy to remember” Teil eines großen Unterhaltungsprogramms ist, verdeutlicht der Blick in das Rahmenprogramm. Da fliegt die Patrouille Suisse, die zweifellos eine tolle Flugshow zeigt, aber mit der Landung in der Normandie so wenig zu tun hat wie die Oktoberfest-Band «Münchner Zwietracht», die als Hauptact am Abend im Festzelt auftritt.

Eigentlich ist dieser Umstand ja keine Überraschung. Geschichte diente schon immer und dient auch heute zur Unterhaltung. So steht es sogar im neuen Deutschschweizer Lehrplan 21: “Die Schülerinnen und Schüler können Geschichte zur Bildung und Unterhaltung nutzen.”[13] Die Formulierung ist gut. Unterhaltung allein reicht nicht. Auch nicht beim Reenactment. Natürlich ist es kein Problem, wenn sich Menschen eine Reenactment-Aufführung lang, eine Schulgeschichtsstunde lang oder einen geschichtlichen Spielfilm lang einfach mit Geschichte unterhalten. Zu einem Problem wird dies erst dann, wenn mit der Unterhaltung auf subtile Weise Einstellungen – zum Beispiel politische oder religiöse – transportiert und vermittelt werden, die sich die Menschen dann unreflektiert aneignen.[14] Zu einem Problem wird diese Unterhaltung anhand von Geschichte auch dann, wenn dadurch auf Dauer der Blick für die Gegenwart und Zukunft verstellt wird. Deshalb ist kritisches Denken im Umgang mit Geschichte so wichtig. Kritisches Denken ermöglicht Bildung. Solch kritisches Denken lernen SchülerInnen in gutem Geschichtsunterricht. Solch kritisches Denken wird dank freier Medien in offenen Gesellschaften gefördert. Kritisches Denken befreit Menschen aus der Gefangenschaft ihrer Gegenwart und öffnet ihren Blick auf Zukunft und Vergangenheit. Sie werden neugierig auf Geschichte.

Neugier auf Geschichte wecken!

Ob das mit militärischem Reenactment gelingen kann? Fragen sich die Reenactors und die ZuschauerInnen wirklich, wie die Menschen damals in Frankreich lebten, als die Alliierten in der Normandie gelandet sind? Was genau haben die Soldaten bei ihrer Landung erlebt? Wie verlief der Vorstoß quer durch Westeuropa? Welche Kriegsverbrechen geschahen im Umfeld der Convoys? Viele wollen genau das nicht wissen. “Wir haben nichts mit Krieg am Hut, also wirklich nur die Technik, die Freude, der Austausch unter Kollegen weltweit”, erklärt Pius Länzlinger, Teilnehmer am Convoy to Remember 2016, dem Schweizer Fernsehen.[15] Alte Gegenstände aus der Vergangenheit in den Händen zu halten oder Reenactment zuzuschauen, trägt weder automatisch zu Neugier auf Geschichte noch zu einem besseren Verständnis von Geschichte bei.

Vielleicht gelingt dies beim experimentierenden Nachspielen von Kulturtechniken oder beim Erleben alltäglicher Lebenssituationen aus anderen Zeiten besser als bei militärischem Reenactment.[16] Und vielleicht gelingt es auch besser, wenn die Reenactors einfach für sich und ohne ZuschauerInnen Geschichte inszenieren. Gute Reenactment-Gruppen allerdings bringen ihre ZuschauerInnen auch bei anspruchsvollen militärischen Themen zum Nachfragen, sei es, dass sie explizit zum Nachfragen einladen, sei es, dass sie ausgewählte Szenen mehrfach und unterschiedlich spielen und dadurch irritieren oder provozieren. So oder so: Reenactment hätte großes Potential, um bei den Beteiligten Neugier zu wecken und damit eine der wichtigsten Voraussetzungen für historisches Lernen und für Bildung zu schaffen. Nur schade, dass die Chance oft verpasst wird.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Daugbjerg, Mads/Syd Eisner, Rivka/Timm Knudsen, Britta (Hrsg.): Re-Enacting the Past. Heritage, materiality and performance. London 2015.
  • Sénécheau, Miriam/Samida, Stefanie: Living History als Gegenstand Historischen Lernens. Begriffe – Problemfelder – Materialien. Stuttgart 2015.
  • Willner, Sarah/Koch, Georg/Samida, Stefanie (Hrsg.): Doing History. Performative Praktiken in der Geschichtskultur (Edition Historische Kulturwissenschaften 1). Münster 2016.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Vgl. zu „Reenactment“ z.B. Reenacting History: Braun, Micha; Heeg, Günther; Krüger, Lars; Schäfer, Helmut (Hrsg.): Reenacting History: Theater & Geschichte. Berlin: Theater der Zeit, 2014. Vgl. auch die Wikipedia-Beiträge zum selben Stichwort „Reenactment“ in verschiedenen Sprachen. Interessant scheint mir beispielsweise, dass im englischsprachigen Beitrag schon im ersten Satz auf den bildenden und unterhaltenden Aspekt von Reenactment aufmerksam gemacht wird: „Historical reenactment (or re-enactment) is an educational or entertainment activity in which people follow a plan to recreate aspects of a historical event or period.“ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_reenactment; letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016)
[2] Auf der Website des Vereins findet sich sowohl das Programm der Veranstaltung wie zum Beispiel auch die Ziele und natürlich eine Reihe von Fotos und Medienberichten über den Anlass: http://www.convoytoremember.com/23-0-Home.html (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).
[3] Zitiert nach: General-Anzeiger; Die Regionalzeitung für den Bezirk Brugg und angrenzende Gemeinden; Nr. 33 vom 15. August 2013; S. 1; online unter http://www.convoytoremember.com/files/rundschaunord_kw_31.pdf (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).
[4] http://www.convoytoremember.com/23-0-Home.html (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016). Zu fragen gäbe es natürlich auch aufgrund dieser Eigenwerbung vieles: Kann und darf man eine Situation, in der die Soldaten dauernd mit ihrem Tod rechnen mussten, überhaupt auf einem „Festplatz“ nachempfinden? Und woran genau wird im Zusammenhang mit diesem „Convoy“ erinnert? Auch daran, dass die Deutschen unmittelbar nach der Invasion mit rücksichtsloser Härte gegen die Zivilbevölkerung vorgingen und in Oradour-sur-Glane z.B. 640 Dorfbewohner massakrierten? Oder daran, dass die befreiten Franzosen Tausende von Kollaborateuren gelyncht und erschossen haben?
[5] http://www.big-red-one.org/ (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).
[6] http://fox502nd.weebly.com/ (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).
[7] http://www.klondikes.nl/reenactment/ (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).
[8] Ebd.
[9] Wie Fußnote 3, S. 14.
[10] http://lebendige-geschichte.ch/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=5916, gepostet am 12. August 2013 um 06:56 (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).
[11] Ebd., gepostet am 12. August 2013 um 07.32 (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).
[12] Wie Fußnote 7.
[13] Lehrplan 21, Fachbereich Räume, Zeiten, Gesellschaften (mit Geografie, Geschichte), Kompetenz 7.2; online unter http://v-ef.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=b|6|4&la=yes (zuletzt am 6.8.2016).
[14] Einstellungen werden auf diese Weise mittels „Kommunikativer Persuasion“ auf peripherem Weg übernommen. Vgl. dazu z.B.: Gautschi, Peter (2008): Der Beitrag des Geschichtsunterrichts zur Entwicklung von Einstellungen. In: Bauer, Jan-Patrick; Meyer-Hamme, Johannes; Körber, Andreas (Hrsg.): Geschichtslernen – Innovationen und Reflexionen. Geschichtsdidaktik im Spannungsfeld von theoretischen Zuspitzungen, empirischen Erkundungen, normativen Überlegungen und pragmatischen Wendungen – Festschrift für Bodo von Borries zum 65. Geburtstag. Kenzingen: Centaurus (Reihe Geschichte; 54), S. 289 – 306. Hier S. 291.
[15] Beitrag „Militär-Oldtimer-Treffer im Aargau“ in der Hauptausgabe der Tagesschau des Schweizer Fernsehens vom 13. August 2016, online unter http://www.srf.ch/play/tv/tagesschau/video/militaer-oldtimer-treffen-im-aargau?id=11f4958e-3f58-4119-a887-4cc46054b564 (letzter Zugriff 14.8.2016).
[16] Auch hier gibt es natürlich gute und weniger gute Beispiele: Was für ein Unsinn, wenn SchülerInnen die Reichsinsignien des Heiligen Römischen Reichs basteln. Vgl. dazu Pandel, Hans-Jürgen (1999): Postmoderne Beliebigkeit? In: Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht, Jg. 50 (1999), S. 282–291. Viel besser scheint mir hier, was alles im Römer-Erlebnispark in Windisch geboten wird. Vgl. dazu https://www.ag.ch/de/bks/kultur/museen_schloesser/legionaerspfad/legionaerspfad.jsp (letzter Zugriff 6.8.2016).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Die Neuinszenierung geschichtlicher Ereignisse fasziniert Handelnde und Zuschauende. Fotographie von Louis Dreyer,  © MACH Corporate & Werbung, Rütistrasse 3a, CH-5401 Baden.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Gautschi, Peter: “Reenactment” – ein gefährlicher Spaß? In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 30, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6873.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Marco Zerwas / Marko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 30
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6873

Tags: , ,

3 replies »

  1. [Eine deutsche Version finden Sie weiter unten.]

    Reenactments of World War I and II: Pop-Cultural Practices und Public Commemoration

    It is true: reenactments and living history are currently experiencing a great demand in German-speaking countries. Twenty years ago, this was absolutely different. Back then you could only find actors costumed in historical dress in the US, Great Britain and Northern Europe where this kind of historical representation has a long tradition. Just think about the first open-air museums in Skansen (Sweden), Plimoth Plantation and Colonial Williamsburg (USA) which were already ‘enlivened‘ by costumed actors in the late 19th and early 20th century. In this context, one must also refer to the early reenactments of the American Civil War in which veterans initially reanimated former battles in theatrical performances.[1]

    Today, these popular practices of adoptions of the past are omnipresent – there is hardly a weekend without a historical city festival, medieval market or costumed actors’ performances in open-air museums. Performative representations of the past also include classical reenactments, meaning the replay or repetition of concrete historical events – often battles – at original historical sites, in precise combat formations and authentic gear. Increasingly, these events are considered to be tributes rather than travesties.[2] In Mai 2016, this was demonstrated when François Hollande, President of the French Republic, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel commemorated the Battle of Verdun during the central ceremony. As part of the commemoration almost 1000 reenactors presented military parades as well as arms, vehicles, medical services and much more.[3] They ‘replaced’ the former veterans.

    In contrast, other ‘World War reenactments’, such as the three-day event “Commemorations descombats de la Sambre” in 2014, are more military: In Sambre, participants reenacted the taking of the village Rosalies and the combat at the Plateau Belle Motte with artillery, an armored vehicle, machine guns and pyrotechnics. In these cases, German reenactment groups are still the exception,[4] because the replay of the First and Second World War is still perceived to be politically disreputable.[5] Taboos and prejudices induce German reenactors to either keep to themselves without any audience or to go abroad. Germany’s ‘commemorative regime’ – ‘No more war’ and therefore a prohibition of all military symbols in public – is still highly effective. However, there are first signs of change; on the so called ‘Mindener Zeitinseln’ in 2014, the audience was able to visit a station run by German reenactors representing the First World War.[6]

    These examples are proof that reenactments are not only admired pop-cultural practices, but have been increasingly gaining ground in public commemorative culture and politics of remembrance. As a phenomenon of memory culture (Erinnerungskultur) we thus should pay more attention to it – this applies especially for WW I and WW II reeanctments which have been neglected by both cultural studies (Kulturwissenschaften) and history didactics.

    At the end of his contribution, Peter Gautschi emphasized the high potential of reenactments which evoke curiosity – one of the central prerequisites for historical learning (historisches Lernen). This notion can be certainly agreed on; this particular field of research, however, still lacks empirical analysis. Up until now, we have not been able to determine the influence of popular culture performances – such as reenactments – on spectators of various ages. We neither assess the knowledge they acquired prior to the events, nor can we tell what they take away at the end of the day.

    To sum it up: empirical studies are needed, otherwise any statements to this phenomenon remain inevitably speculative.

    Footnotes
    [1] Wolfgang Hochbruck: Reenacting Across Six Generations: 1863–1963. In: Sarah Willner/Georg Koch/Stefanie Samida (eds.), Doing History: Performative Praktiken in der Geschichtskultur. Edition Historische Kulturwissenschaften 1. Münster, New York 2016, pp. 97–116. – Many thanks go to V. Bühling (Heidelberg) for her proofreading.
    [2] Dan Todman, The Ninetieth Anniversary of the Battle of the Somme. In: Michael Keren/Holger H. Herwig (eds.), War Memory and Popular Culture. Essays on Modes of Remembrance and Commemoration (Jefferson/NC, London 2009) pp. 23–40, here p. 35
    [3] Cf. http://centenaire.org/de/frankreich/lorraine/meuse/historisches-reenactment-fuer-verdun and the photos on http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/event/verdun-commemorates-100th-anniversary-of-world-war-i-battle-642356499#locals-and-a-history-reenactor-dressed-as-a-world-war-i-german-a-picture-id534805838 (last accessed 7.September 2016).
    [4] For more information on the reenactment of the Battle of the Sambre see the website of the reenactment group „Darstellungsgruppe Süddeutsches Militär (DSM)“, http://dsm1918.de/SEITE_SAMBRE_2014.html (last accessed 7.September 2016).
    [5] However, in Great Britain, the United States and in Poland WW II reenactments are socially accepted, cf. Wiederholungen der Vergangenheit. Formen des Reenactments in Medien, Kunst und Wissenschaft. Interview mit Magdalena Marzałek und Anja Schwarz. In: Portal Wissen: Das Forschungsmagazin der Universität Potsdam 2014/2, pp. 96–99, here 98; Sandra Petermann, Rituale machen Räume. Zum kollektiven Gedenken der Schlacht von Verdun und der Landung in der Normandie (Bielefeld 2007) pp. 285 ff.
    [6] Cf. Stefanie Samida/Ruzana Liburkina: Living History-Darstellungen zum Ersten Weltkrieg als erinnerungskulturelles Phänomen: Nationalhistorische Narrative und Europäisierungstendenzen. In: Bayerisches Jahrbuch für Volkskunde 2016, pp. 41–54.

    ———–

    Weltkriegsreenactments: Populärkulturelle Praktik und öffentliches Gedenken

    Es ist wahr: Reenactment und Living History erleben derzeit im deutschsprachigen Raum eine Konjunktur. Das war vor zwanzig noch ganz anders. Damals begegnete man verkleideten Darstellern lediglich in den USA, in Großbritannien und in Nordeuropa, wo diese Art der Geschichtsrepräsentation eine lange Tradition hat. Erinnert sei nur an die ersten Freilichtmuseen in Skansen (Schweden) sowie Plimoth Plantation und Colonial Williamsburg (beide USA), die schon im späten 19. Jahrhundert bzw. im frühen 20. Jahrhundert durch Darsteller belebt wurden; anzuführen sind auch die frühen Nachstellungen des Amerikanischen Bürgerkriegs in den USA, wo zunächst Veteranen einstige Schlachten in theatralen Aufführungsformen wieder aufleben ließen.[1]

    Heute ist diese populärkulturelle Praktik der Geschichtsaneignung omnipräsent – kaum ein Wochenende vergeht ohne historisches Stadtfest, Mittelalterspektakel oder die ‚Belebung‘ von Freilichtmuseen durch kostümierte Darsteller. Auch das klassische Reenactment, also das Nachspielen bzw. Wiederholen konkreter geschichtlicher Ereignisse – in der Regel von Schlachten – an Originalschauplätzen, in historisch exakten Gefechtsformationen und originalgetreu nachgebildeten Ausrüstungen gehört zu diesen performativen Vergangenheitsvergegenwärtigungen. Sie gelten zunehmend als Tribut an vergangene Zeiten und nicht (mehr) als deren Zerrbild.[2] Dies war besonders eindrücklich im Mai 2016 zu sehen, als der französische Staatspräsident François Hollande und die deutsche Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel der Schlacht um Verdun bei der zentralen Festveranstaltung gedachten. Im Rahmen der Gedenkveranstaltung traten ca. 1000 Reenactors aus den am Krieg beteiligen Ländern auf und präsentierten neben Militärparaden auch Waffen und Kraftfahrzeuge, das Sanitätswesen und vieles andere.[3] Sie ersetzten sozusagen die einstigen Veteranen.

    Auf anderen ‘Weltkriegsreenactements‘, wie der dreitägigen Großveranstaltung „Commemorations descombats de la Sambre“ (2014), geht es deutlich kriegerischer zu. Hier wurde beispielsweise unter Einsatz von Artillerie, gepanzertem Automobil, Maschinengewehren und Pyrotechnik die Einnahme des Dorfes Roselies und das Gefecht auf dem Plateau Belle Motte wirkmächtig nachgestellt. Deutsche Reenactmentgruppen sind bei solchen Veranstaltungen allerdings noch die Ausnahme,[4] weil das Nachspielen des Ersten oder gar Zweiten Weltkriegs immer noch als politisch anrüchig gilt.[5] Tabus und Vorurteile führen dazu, dass die Darsteller unter sich und ohne Zuschauer bleiben oder ins Ausland ausweichen. Das spezifisch deutsche ‘Erinnerungsregime‘ – ‘Nie wieder Krieg‘ und der damit zusammenhängende Ausschluss öffentlicher Darstellung militärischer Symbolik – greift also noch immer. Es gibt aber erste Indizien des Wandels; auf den “Mindener Zeitinseln“ 2014 konnte das Publikum auch eine Station zum Ersten Weltkrieg mit deutschen Reenactors besuchen.[6]

    Die Beispiele zeigen: Reenactments sind nicht nur eine beliebte populärkulturelle Praktik, sondern halten immer häufiger auch Einzug in die öffentliche Gedenkkultur und Erinnerungspolitik. Als Phänomen der Erinnerungskultur sollten sie daher von der Forschung mehr beachtet werden; das gilt gerade für die WK I- und WK II-Reenactmentszene, die bisher kaum im Fokus kulturwissenschaftlicher und schon gar nicht geschichtsdidaktischer Betrachtungen stand.

    Peter Gautschi hat am Ende seines Beitrags das große Potential von Reenactments betont; sie könnten Neugier wecken und damit eine wichtige Voraussetzung für historisches Lernen schaffen. Dem ist beizupflichten. Doch es fehlen schlicht empirische Analysen. Wir wissen eben nicht, welchen Einfluss populärkulturelle Inszenierungen wie Reenactments auf die Zuschauer – egal welchen Alters – haben. Wir wissen nicht, was sie am Ende des Tages aus diesen Veranstaltungen mitnehmen; wir wissen nicht einmal, mit welchem Vorwissen sie zu den Veranstaltungen kommen.

    Kurz: Empirische Studien tun dringend not, sonst bleiben alle Aussagen zu diesem Phänomen notwendingerweise spekulativ.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Wolfgang Hochbruck: Reenacting Across Six Generations: 1863–1963. In: Sarah Willner/Georg Koch/Stefanie Samida (Hrsg.), Doing History: Performative Praktiken in der Geschichtskultur. Edition Historische Kulturwissenschaften 1. Münster, New York 2016, S. 97–116.
    [2] Dan Todman, The Ninetieth Anniversary of the Battle of the Somme. In: Michael Keren/Holger H. Herwig (Hrsg.), War Memory and Popular Culture. Essays on Modes of Remembrance and Commemoration. Jefferson/NC, London 2009, S. 23–40, hier S. 35.
    [3] Vgl. http://centenaire.org/de/frankreich/lorraine/meuse/historisches-reenactment-fuer-verdun und die Bilder auf http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/event/verdun-commemorates-100th-anniversary-of-world-war-i-battle-642356499#locals-and-a-history-reenactor-dressed-as-a-world-war-i-german-a-picture-id534805838 (letzter Zugriff 7.9.2016).
    [4] Zur Nachstellung der Schlacht an der Sambre vgl. die Website der Reenactmentgruppe “Darstellungsgruppe Süddeutsches Militär (DSM)“, http://dsm1918.de/SEITE_SAMBRE_2014.html (letzter Zugriff 7.9.2016).
    [5] Anders ist das in Großbritannien, den USA und Polen, hier ist die Nachstellung von Ereignissen des Zweiten Weltkriegs längst salonfähig, vgl. z. B. Wiederholungen der Vergangenheit. Formen des Reenactments in Medien, Kunst und Wissenschaft. Interview mit Magdalena Marzałek und Anja Schwarz. In: Portal Wissen: Das Forschungsmagazin der Universität Potsdam 2014/2, S. 96–99, hier S. 98; Sandra Petermann, Rituale machen Räume. Zum kollektiven Gedenken der Schlacht von Verdun und der Landung in der Normandie. Bielefeld 2007, S. 285 ff.
    [6] Dazu Stefanie Samida/Ruzana Liburkina: Living History-Darstellungen zum Ersten Weltkrieg als erinnerungskulturelles Phänomen: Nationalhistorische Narrative und Europäisierungstendenzen. In: Bayerisches Jahrbuch für Volkskunde 2016, S. 41–54.

  2. Einen Dank an Peter Gautschi für das Behandeln dieses Themas. Ich tue mich schon lange schwer mit dem “Reenactment”, denn es ist ja nicht nur ein Nachstellen von wahrgenommener Vergangenheit, sondern ein Verlangen der Akteure, etwas nachzuleben. In diesem Sinne ist es bezeichnend, dass ganz häufig Schlachten nachgespielt werden. Das kann davon kommen, dass die überwiegende Mehrheit der Nachspieler Männer sind. Beim Nachspielen von Mittelalterlichem vermischt sich dabei Sagenhaftes (Drachentöter, World of Warcraft Figuren) mit Historischem.

    Zu den Weltkriegen: Gautschi meint und Samida stimmt ein und ich pflichte bei, dass die Empirie fehlt. Mein Ansatz wäre, kritisch danach zu fragen, wie wohl die eigentlichen Veteranen sich fühlen, wenn sie sehen, wie sie nachgeäfft werden. Mein eigener Grossvater war britischer Kriegsveteran und litt zeitlebens unter dem Erlebten. Dass der Krieg eine traumatische Erfahrung ist, die das Leben prägt, geht vollends unter. Dieses nachgespielte militärische Grüßen und Strammstehen ignoriert, dass die Kriegsmüdigkeit das hierarchische Ranggehabe aufweichte. Und eben diese Diskrepanz zwischen dem Nachspielen und der effektiven Begebenheit machen diese nachgeäfften Kriegsspiele so unglaubwürdig. In meinen Augen ist das eine männliche Befriedigung eines nicht erlebten Kriegstriebs. Nur die Kritik daran kann geschichtswissenschaftliches Lernen erzeugen.

  3. [Eine deutsche Version finden Sie weiter unten.]

    Reenactment as a Mediator between Science and Pop Culture

    Authenticity and temporality pose some of the greatest challenges which the science of history has to face. To get to the bottom of them constitutes the core business of historical work – and is a frequent reason for never-endingly racking one’s brains. Pop-cultural practices of representations of history such as reenactments shake the foundations of these historical basic parameters by offering interpretation which is in fact aimed at scripts serving the purpose of entertaining rather than at providing theoretically and empirically substantiated findings. In principal, no objections can be made with respect to this. Also scientific historiography is always a construct of the present.

    Peter Gautschi is quite right to point out that history has always served the purpose of entertainment. In addition, reenactments complement conventional representations of history mostly limited to textuality with a haptic-material dimension. This speaks in favor of them in so far as too little attention is still paid to visual or material culture as a research subject and method, at least in the science of history of the German-speaking world. [1] In this way academic and non-academic approaches like living history can engage in dialogue with each other and, as Daugbjerg, Eisner and Timm Knudsen (2016) have lately demonstrated on the example of cultural heritage, in fact stimulate more reflection and the development of critical counter-representations. [2] That sounds plausible in theory at least. Due to lack of reception studies it must simply be assumed what images, perceptions and ways of interpreting history the visitors of such events however really generate. Furthermore, there are more or less problematic or sensitive subjects of staged past. Thus, the stereotyped ideal-world-atmosphere of an open-air museum can in fact certainly contribute to the folkloristic and national-romantic sentiments of its visitors. That something like a political agenda is run with it, must, however, rather be doubted.

    Already far more delicate are the military reenactments such as the “Convoy to Remember” commented on by Peter Gautschi. According to the Organizing Committee this “military oldtimer show” has set the priority objective to remind people of the liberation of Europe and the landing of the Allies in 1944. [3] But what in fact the “military feast in the festival tent”, the “warm-up with DJ Xandl from Ischgl“ or the demo of the service dog handlers should have to do with the Second World War and its memory culture remains quite unclear. [4] Army chief André Blattmann, nevertheless, emphasized in his opening speech at this year’s “Convoy”: “I am pleased that tradition, history and the present are combined here. We have to know the past and take care of the future. (…) Whoever does not care about the safety of his or her own, is likely to become a political football of history.” FDP National Councilor Thierry Burkart then criticized the army budget cuts which would “underpin a credible security policy”. [5]

    Against the background of such remarks the question in fact arises as to whether living history or rather lobbying is going on here. And what impact such messages have on the audience in times in which large parts of the population are susceptible for utterances inciting fear. All of this does not have much to do with history. Here it simply serves as a label for a spare time event at which young children swinging Swiss flags cheer at military vehicles rolling past. However, the fact that not only a handful of experts or nostalgics but over 20’000 people attended this event deserves special attention. When else do so many people attend a lecture or read a well-researched article? – But here clearly lies the great potential of such “histotainments”. If science and pop culture went hand in hand more often, then reenactments could act as a hinge between a “well-researched” and a “staged” past (and present) and in this way make an important contribution to a profound conveyance of history.

    References
    [1] Cf. also Ludwig, Andreas: Geschichtswissenschaft. In: Samida, Stefanie/ Eggert, Manfred K.H./Hahn, Hans Peter (Eds.): Handbuch Materielle Kultur. Bedeutungen, Konzepte, Disziplinen. Stuttgart 2014. p. 287-293.
    [2] “…re-enactment does not, as some critics tend to argue, of and by itself ‘distort’ or ‘falsify’ history or heritage, and we hold that an academically reflexive dialogue and critique – in some cases, even, co-participation – may, in fact, be productive in shaping fresh awareness, heightened reflexivity and counter-narratives, and increased access for new audiences around heritage.”, Daugbjerg, Mads/Eisner, Rivka Syd/Timm Knudsen, Britta: Re-enacting the past: vivifying heritage ‘again’. In: Dies. (Eds.): Re-Enacting the Past. Heritage, materiality and performance. London 2016. p. 3.
    [3] http://www.convoytoremember.com/1-0-Ueber-uns.html (last accessed 23.9.2016).
    [4] http://www.convoytoremember.com/8-0-Programm.html (last accessed 23.9.2016).
    [5] http://www.convoytoremember.com/23-0-Home.html (last accessed 23.9.2016).

    ———————

    Reenactment als Mediator zwischen Wissenschaft und Popkultur

    Zu den grössten Herausforderungen, denen sich die Geschichtswissenschaft stellen muss, gehören Authentizität und Zeitlichkeit. Ihnen auf die Spur zu kommen, ist Kerngeschäft historischen Arbeitens – und häufiger Grund nicht enden wollenden Kopfzerbrechens. Populärkulturelle Praktiken von Geschichtsrepräsentation wie Reenactments rütteln an den Grundfesten dieser historischen Basisgrössen, indem sich das Deutungsangebot weniger auf theoretisch und empirisch fundierte Erkenntnisse stützt als vielmehr auf dem Unterhaltungszweck dienliche Drehbücher. Dagegen ist erst einmal nichts einzuwenden. Auch wissenschaftliche Geschichtsschreibung ist stets ein Konstrukt der Gegenwart.

    Peter Gautschi hat Recht, wenn er statuiert, dass Geschichte schon immer der Unterhaltung gedient habe. Zudem ergänzen Reenactments konventionelle, meistens auf Schriftlichkeit limitierte Geschichtsrepräsentationen um eine haptisch-materielle Dimension. Das ist ihnen insofern zugute zu halten, als dass visueller oder materieller Kultur als Forschungsgegenstand und -methode zumindest in der deutschsprachigen Geschichtswissenschaft noch immer zu wenig Beachtung geschenkt wird.[1] Auf diese Weise können akademische und ausserakademische Ansätze wie Living History in einen Dialog miteinander treten und durchaus, wie Daugbjerg, Eisner und Timm Knudsen (2016) am Beispiel Kulturerbe jüngst gezeigt haben, zu mehr Reflexion und der Entwicklung kritischer Gegendarstellungen anregen.[2] Das klingt zumindest in der Theorie plausibel. Welche Bilder, Vorstellungen und Deutungsweisen von Geschichte die Besucher solcher Veranstaltungen jedoch tatsächlich generieren, bleibt aufgrund mangelnder Rezeptionsstudien bloss zu vermuten. Ausserdem gibt es problematischere und weniger heikle Gegenstände inszenierter Vergangenheit. So kann die stereotype Heile-Welt-Atmosphäre eines Freilichtmuseums zwar sicher zu folkloristischen oder nationalromantischen Stimmungslagen seiner Besucher beitragen. Dass damit so etwas wie politische Agenda betrieben wird, ist aber eher zu bezweifeln.

    Schon weitaus delikater sind da militärische Reenactments wie der von Peter Gautschi kommentierte “Convoy to Remember“. Diese “Militär-Oldtimer-Show“ hat es sich laut Organisationskomitee zum prioritären Ziel gesetzt, “an die Befreiung Europas und die Landung der Alliierten 1944“ zu erinnern.[3] Was jetzt aber der “Soldatenschmaus im Festzelt“, das “Warm-Up mit DJ Xandl aus Ischgl“ oder die “Demo Diensthundeführer der Militärpolizei“ mit dem Zweiten Weltkrieg und dessen Gedächtniskultur zu tun haben sollen, ist nicht ganz klar.[4] Armeechef André Blattmann betonte in seiner Eröffnungsrede am diesjährigen “Convoy“ dennoch: “Es freut mich, dass hier Tradition, Geschichte und Gegenwart kombiniert wird. Wir müssen die Vergangenheit kennen und Sorge tragen zur Zukunft. (…) Wer nicht selber zu seiner Sicherheit schaut, wird zum Spielball der Geschichte.“ FDP-Nationalrat Thierry Burkart monierte anschliessend die Armee-Budgetkürzungen, die eine “glaubwürdige Sicherheitspolitik“ untermauern würden.[5]

    Angesichts solcher Bemerkungen stellt sich schon die Frage, ob hier Living History oder Lobbyismus betrieben wird. Und wie solche Botschaften in Zeiten, in denen grosse Bevölkerungsteile Europas anfällig für angstschürende Äusserungen sind, auf die Zuschauer wirken. Mit Geschichte hat das alles nicht viel zu tun. Sie fungiert hier lediglich als Etikett für einen Freizeitevent, an dem Schweizerfahnen schwingende Kleinkinder den vorbei rollenden Militär-Fahrzeugen zujubeln. Allerdings ist dem Umstand, dass nicht nur eine Handvoll Experten oder Nostalgiker, sondern über 20 000 Menschen dieser Veranstaltung beiwohnten, besonders Rechnung zu tragen. Wann besuchen schon mal so viele Menschen einen historischen Vortrag oder lesen einen gut recherchierten Artikel? – Hier steckt das grosse Potential solcher “Histotainments“. Wenn Wissenschaft und Popkultur mehr Hand in Hand gingen, würden Reenactments ein Scharnier zwischen erforschter und gespielter Vergangenheit (und Gegenwart) bilden können und auf diese Weise einen wichtigen Beitrag zur profunderen Geschichtsvermittlung leisten.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Vgl. u.a. Ludwig, Andreas: Geschichtswissenschaft. In: Samida, Stefanie/ Eggert, Manfred K.H./Hahn, Hans Peter (Hrsg.): Handbuch Materielle Kultur. Bedeutungen, Konzepte, Disziplinen. Stuttgart 2014. S. 287-293.
    [2] “…re-enactment does not, as some critics tend to argue, of and by itself ‘distort’ or ‘falsify’ history or heritage, and we hold that an academically reflexive dialogue and critique – in some cases, even, co-participation – may, in fact, be productive in shaping fresh awareness, heightened reflexivity and counter-narratives, and increased access for new audiences around heritage.”, Daugbjerg, Mads/Eisner, Rivka Syd/Timm Knudsen, Britta: Re-enacting the past: vivifying heritage ‘again’. In: Dies. (Hrsg.): Re-Enacting the Past. Heritage, materiality and performance. London 2016. S. 3.
    [3] http://www.convoytoremember.com/1-0-Ueber-uns.html (Letzter Zugriff am 23.09.2016).
    [4] http://www.convoytoremember.com/8-0-Programm.html (Letzter Zugriff am 23.09.2016).
    [5] http://www.convoytoremember.com/23-0-Home.html (Letzter Zugriff am 23.09.2016).

Pin It on Pinterest