History on Stage: News from History Theater

Geschichte auf der Bühne: Neues vom Geschichtstheater

 


History is booming – this platitude has been around for nearly 30 years. But although movies and television, exhibitions and memorial sites, reenactments and living history, history magazines and computer games have increasingly become objects of research in popular and popularized representations of history, one particular field has, until now, been omitted: history theater. Here, the simulation of the past encounters its deconstruction–therefore it should become a field of research for public history.

 

In the Third Wave

The term history theater is not used as an umbrella term for various kinds of reenactments and living history, as profoundly introduced by Wolfgang Hochbruck in his monograph, “Geschichtstheater”. Here it is understood as a specific kind of documentary theater,[1] that Hochbruck has not dealt with until now.[2] History and not “fictitious” stories have been conquering the stage since a decade in manifold ways. In the third wave[3] of the documentary theater in Germany (heavily influenced by the directors’ collective Rimini Protocol), history theater plays an important role.

From the Wannsee to the Hungerplan Conference

A few examples: Since November last year, on the occasion of the First World War centenary, Sonja Valentin’s project, “Tatort: Schlachtfeld” (Crime Scene: Battlefield), has toured through Germany. In 2007, the project “Aus den Akten auf die Bühne” (Out of the Files onto the Stage) was initiated by the historian Eva Schöck-Quinteros. Here, with the assistance of Bremer historians, the Bremer Shakespeare Company brings historical sources – mostly files – as play readings to the stage; most recently in Berlin: “’In the camp I was also turned into a criminal.’ Margarete Ries: from ‘anti-social’ inmate of Ravensbrück to Kapo in Auschwitz”. Furthermore, the Historians’ Lab Association engaged in play readings of historical sources (here also mostly files). In 2012 they performed the “Wannsee-Conference” and in 2014 the “Hungerplan Conference” – partly on theater stages, partly at (historical) sites of remembrance, such as the House of the Wannsee Conference or the German-Russian Museum in Berlin-Karlshorst.[4] Upcoming this year, a theater project about the crimes of the early National Socialist movement and remembrance of its victims is planned for the SA Prison Papestraße memorial in Berlin.[5]

An Aesthetic Pleasure Only?

What can be seen here are various accesses to history, sources, and experts in historical science and, of course, diverse ideas about authenticity that are presented to the public on the stage. If documentary theater seeks to bring “reality”, or the “real truth”, and no longer “fictitious stories” to the stage, what does this mean for a “staged history”? The “Crime Scene: Battlefield” project turned out to be extracts from the anthology, “Über den Feldern. Der Erste Weltkrieg in großen Erzählungen der Weltliteratur“ (“Over the Fields. The First World War in Great Stories of World Literature”),[6] and presented, as play readings by professional actors (who had all played in the famous German crime series Tatort), first and foremost an aesthetic pleasure – (mostly) the commonplaces about the atrocities of the war were staged in highly stylized forms. But because of the lack of historical integration, which could have been part the post-performance discussions, the project lagged behind its educational potential.[7]

An Addiction

Andreas Tobler summarizes this potential as follows: “Documentary theater is captivating exactly because it reflects on its own expectations, conditions, and opportunities and, with this self-reflection, the stage becomes a laboratory for reality […]“.[8] Documentary theater has access to a variety of strategies for generating credibility or simulating authenticity.[9] But, on the other hand, the stage is exactly the place to break open the mechanisms of creating reality, they can be made transparent and therefore allow reflection on the inevitability of fiction in constructing reality.[10] The documentary history theater has the chance to confront the “addiction to authenticity”[11] with the (de)construction of historiographic narratives.

More Theater Reviews!

But this is a potential, not an inescapable fact. In the new documentary theater, often the name, the physical body and the biography of the actor fuse together into one identity. Thus, authenticity is understood and staged almost only as experience and self-awareness. This can be very liberating when broaching the issue of social injustice. However, if historians read, on the stage, from files (Historians’ Lab), the amalgamation of actor and expert can lead to a new mode of historicism. The aura of authenticity is then created through the professional authority of this person. Since he or she lends, at the same time, his or her voice to a historical witness (or, more precisely, perpetrator), how is the simulation of authenticity then exposed?

Historikerlabor: Projekt "Die Wannsee-Konferenz - Die Verfolgung und Vernichtung der Juden Europas, 20. Januar 1942" (Wo?, Mai 2012)

Historian Lab, performance of the „Wannsee Conference“ in May 2012 at the Maxim-Gorki-Theater Berlin, by courtesy of the Historian Lab, © Philipp von Breitenbach.

The audience should have the opportunity to question this staged authority. Historical sources (or at least most of them) do not speak for themselves, they are not obvious, although this seems to be one of the most important marketing strategies of history theater, as the blog “Out of the files onto the stage” demonstrates:

“The target is to allow files to speak for themselves on the stage and, in this way, to provide a broad public access to source-based research on a current topic. Play reading is exceptionally well-suited for this, because it relies on the language of the documents and makes it possible to present historical texts without supplementary explanations, commentaries, and interpretations.“[12]

Interpretation and orchestration happens of necessity. A good history theater allows and offers its audience a reflection on this process. One possible conclusion: there is a need for more reviews of theater plays in this and other humanities portals.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Nikitin, Boris et al. (eds.) (2014): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin: Theater der Zeit.
  • Pirker, Eva Ulrike et al. (eds.) (2010): Echte Geschichte. Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen, Bielefeld: transcript 2010.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] By way of introduction, Barbara Gronau: Das Versprechen des Realen: Vorstellungen von Wirklichkeit im Theater des 20. Jahrhunderts, in: Boris Nikotin et al. (eds.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, pp. 126-134.
[2] Wolfgang Hochbruck: Geschichtstheater. Formen der “Living History”. Eine Typologie, Bielefeld 2013.
[3] Cf. Andreas Tobler: Kontingente Evidenzen. Über Möglichkeiten des dokumentarischen Theaters, in: Boris Nikotin et al. (eds.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, pp. 147-161, here p. 148.
[4] See the homepage of the Historians’ Lab, projects, URL: http://historikerlabor.de/projekte.html (accessed 01.04.2016).
[5] Source: Call for participation for MA students of theater pedagogy of the Berlin University of the Arts, distributed through Action Reconciliation/Service for Peace on 06.04.2016. The project is a cooperation with the Museums Tempelhof-Schöneberg.
[6] Horst Launiger (ed.): Über den Feldern: Der Erste Weltkrieg in großen Erzählungen der Weltliteratur, Zürich 2014.
[7] This was at least the case for the performance in Dresden, where Gerd Henkel, Michael Kretschmer, and Hubert Spiegel (chair) discussed actual projects more or less unrelated to the reading.
[8] Andreas Tobler: Kontingente Evidenzen. Über Möglichkeiten des dokumentarischen Theaters, p. 147.
[9] Cf. Franz Liebl: Strategien zur Erzeugung von Glaubwürdigkeit, in: Boris Nikitin et al. (eds.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, pp. 135-146; Eva Ulrike Pirker und Mark Rüdiger: Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen: Annäherungen, in: Eva Ulrike Parker et al. (eds.): Echte Geschichte. Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen, Bielefeld 2010, pp. 11-30.
[10] Boris Nikitin: Der unzuverlässige Zeuge, in: Boris Nikotin et al. (eds.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, pp. 12-19.
[11] Tobias Becker and Wolfgang Höbel: “Wir kommen mit unserer Wut”, in: Der Spiegel, 50 (2008), pp. 176-179.
[12] Blog “Out of the files onto the stage“; Report: Projektreihe/Die Idee, URL: http://www.sprechende-akten.de/ (accessed 03.04.2016).

_____________________

Image Credits
Please, stay off the stage. © Matthew Baldwin 2015 (via flickr)

Recommended Citation
Gundermann, Christine: History on stage: News from History Theater. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 26, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6440.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Geschichte boomt – dieser Allgemeinplatz lässt sich mittlerweile seit etwa drei Dekaden formulieren. Obwohl Film und Fernsehen, Ausstellungen und Gedenkstätten, Reenactment und Living History, Geschichtsmagazine und Computerspiele immer häufiger zu Untersuchungsfeldern populärer und popularisierender Geschichtsrepräsentationen werden, gibt es bis jetzt ein Feld, dass fast gar nicht betrachtet wurde: das Geschichtstheater. Hier treffen Simulationen von Vergangenheit und deren Dekonstruktion aufeinander – und deshalb muss es ein Untersuchungsfeld der Public History werden.

In der dritten Welle

Der Begriff des Geschichtstheaters dient hierbei nicht als Kofferbegriff für verschiedenste Formen des Reenactments und der Living History, wie ihn Wolfgang Hochbruck in seiner Monografie “Geschichtstheater” durchaus begründet vorstellt, sondern soll hier als spezifische Form des dokumentarischen Theaters[1] verstanden werden, die Hochbruck bis jetzt ausblendet.[2] Geschichte, nicht (fiktive) Geschichten erobern die Bühne seit mehreren Jahren in mannigfacher Form. In der durch das Regie-Kollektiv Rimini-Protokoll stark beeinflussten dritten Welle[3] des dokumentarischen Theaters in Deutschland spielt das Geschichtstheater eine entscheidende Rolle.

Von der Wannsee- zur Hungerplan-Konferenz

So tourt zum Centenarium des Ersten Weltkriegs das Projekt der Dramaturgin Sonja Valentin “Tatort: Schlachtfeld” seit November letzten Jahres durch deutsche Städte. Das von der Bremer Historikerin Eva Schöck-Quinteros entwickelte Projekt “Aus den Akten auf die Bühne” bringt als Kooperation von Geschichtsstudierenden und der Bremer Shakespeare Company bereits seit 2007 szenische Lesungen zur Aufführung – so jüngst in Berlin “‘Im Lager hat man auch mich zum Verbrecher gemacht.’
Margarete Ries: Vom ‘asozialen’ Häftling in Ravensbrück zum Kapo in Auschwitz”. Der Verein Historikerlabor brachte bereits 2012 die Akten der “Wannsee-Konferenz” und 2014 “Die Hungerplan-Konferenz” auf die Bühne – die teils Theaterbühnen und teils (historische) Erinnerungsorte wie das Haus der Wannsee-Konferenz oder aber das Deutsch-Russische Museum Berlin-Karlshorst waren.[4] Im Berliner Gedenkort SA-Gefängnis Papestraße wird demnächst ein Theaterprojekt über die Verbrechen des frühen Nationalsozialismus und das Gedenken an seine Opfer durchgeführt.[5]

Nur ein ästhetisches Vergnügen?

Was sich in dieser kurzen Aufzählung deutlich ablesen lässt, sind die verschiedenen Rückgriffe auf Geschichten, Quellen und ExpertInnen der Geschichtswissenschaft und nicht zuletzt die sehr unterschiedlichen Vorstellungen von einer dem Publikum dargebotenen “Authentizität”. Wenn das dokumentarische Theater vor allem “die Realität”, “das Wirkliche” und nicht mehr “erfundene Geschichten” auf die Bühne bringt, was heißt das dann für die so inszenierte Geschichte? Der “Tatort: Schlachtfeld” entpuppt sich als Auskopplung und Inszenierung des Sammelbandes “Über den Feldern. Der Erste Weltkrieg in großen Erzählungen der Weltliteratur”[6] und präsentiert als szenische Lesung durch ausgebildete SchauspielerInnen (die alle in der populären Tatort-Krimiserie mitgespielt hatten) vor allem ein ästhetisches Vergnügen – die Allgemeinplätze der Grausamkeiten des Krieges werden in hoch stilistischer Form präsentiert; durch die fehlende historische Einordnung – die durchaus die jeweils nachgelagerte Podiumsdiskussion hätte leisten können[7] – bleibt das Projekt jedoch hinter seinem aufklärerischen Potential zurück.

Eine Sucht

Was damit heute gemeint ist, fasst Andreas Tobler wunderbar zusammen: “Das dokumentarische Theater besticht gerade darin, dass es seine eigenen Ansprüche, Bedingungen und Möglichkeiten reflektiert, und mit dieser Selbstreflexion wird die Bühne zum Labor der Wirklichkeit […].”[8] Dem dokumentarischen Theater stehen also einerseits mannigfaltige Strategien der “Erzeugung von Glaubwürdigkeit” oder der Simulation von Authentizität zur Verfügung.[9] Andererseits können hier genau diese Mechanismen der Erzeugung von Wirklichkeit aufgebrochen, transparent gemacht und die Unvermeidlichkeit der Fiktion in der Konstruktion der Realität reflektiert werden.[10] Damit hat das dokumentarische Geschichtstheater die Möglichkeit, der “Sucht nach Authentizität” [11] die De/Konstruktion der historiografischen Narration gegenüberzustellen.

Mehr Theaterkritiken!

Dies ist jedoch ein Potential und keine Zwangsläufigkeit. Im neuen Dokumentartheater verschmelzen oftmals DarstellerInnen, Eigenname, Körper und Biografie zu einer Identität, die Authentizität fast ausschließlich als Erlebnis, als Eigen-Erlebtes begreift und inszeniert. Bei dem Problematisieren von sozialen Ungerechtigkeiten in der Gesellschaft kann das sehr befreiend sein, sprechen aber HistorikerInnen auf der Bühne aus den Akten (Historikerlabor), so kann gerade die Personalunion von DarstellerInnen und ExpertInnen durchaus zu einem neuen Modus des Historismus führen.

Historikerlabor: Projekt “Die Wannsee-Konferenz – Die Verfolgung und Vernichtung der Juden Europas, 20. Januar 1942” (Maxim-Gorki-Theater, Mai 2012) © Philipp von Breitenbach

Die Aura des Authentischen wird dann über die fachliche Authorität der Person hergestellt, die aber gleichzeitig SprecherIn eines historischen Zeugen (meist einer/s TäterIn) ist – wie wird dann diese Authentizitätsfiktion aufgebrochen – so müssen sich Zuschauende doch immer wieder fragen können. Historische Quellen sprechen eben in den seltensten Fällen für sich, sie sind nicht evident, auch wenn dies eines der häufigsten Marketingstrategien des Geschichtstheaters ist, wie im Blog von “Aus den Akten auf die Bühne” zu lesen ist:

“Ziel ist es, Akten auf der Bühne zum Sprechen zu bringen und auf diese Weise einem breiten Publikum quellenbasierte Forschung zu einem aktuellen Thema zugänglich machen. Die szenische Lesung eignet sich hierfür hervorragend, denn sie verlässt sich auf die Sprache der Dokumente und erlaubt es, historische Texte ohne ergänzende Erläuterungen, Kommentare und Interpretationen vorzustellen.”[12]

Eine Interpretation und Inszenierung findet zwangsläufig statt; gutes Geschichtstheater bietet dem Publikum eine Reflexion auf diesen Prozess an. Ein mögliches Fazit: mehr Theaterkritiken!

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Nikotin, Boris u.a. (Hg.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014.
  • Pirker, Eva Ulrike u.a. (Hg.): Echte Geschichte. Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen, Bielefeld 2010.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Einführend dazu: Barbara Gronau: Das Versprechen des Realen: Vorstellungen von Wirklichkeit im Theater des 20. Jahrhunderts, in: Boris Nikitin u.a. (Hg.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, S. 126-134.
[2] Wolfgang Hochbruck: Geschichtstheater. Formen der “Living History”. Eine Typologie, Bielefeld 2013.
[3] Vgl. Andreas Tobler: Kontingente Evidenzen. Über Möglichkeiten des dokumentarischen Theaters, in: Boris Nikitin u.a. (Hg.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, S. 147-161, hier S. 148.
[4] Vgl. Homepage des Historikerlabors, Projekte, URL: http://historikerlabor.de/projekte.html (letzter Zugriff am 01.04.2016).
[5] Nach einem Aufruf zur Mitwirkung von Masterstudierenden der Theaterpädagogik der Universität der Künste über den Verteiler der Aktion Sühnezeichen/Friedensdienste vom 06.04.2016. Das Projekt findet in Kooperation mit den Museen Tempelhof-Schöneberg statt.
[6] Horst Lauinger (Hg.): Über den Feldern: Der Erste Weltkrieg in großen Erzählungen der Weltliteratur, Zürich 2014.
[7] So zumindest bei der Aufführung in Dresden, bei der Gerd Henkel, Michael Kretschmer und Moderator Hubert Spiegel eher die Gelegenheit nutzten, und bisweilen relativ kontextlos eigene aktuelle Projekte besprachen.
[8] Tobler: Kontingente Evidenzen. Über Möglichkeiten des dokumentarischen Theaters, S. 147.
[9] Vgl. Franz Liebl: Strategien zur Erzeugung von Glaubwürdigkeit, in: Boris Nikitin u.a. (Hg.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, S. 135-146; Eva Ulrike Pirker und Mark Rüdiger: Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen: Annäherungen, in: Eva Ulrike Pirker u.a. (Hg.): Echte Geschichte. Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen, Bielefeld 2010, S. 11-30.
[10] Boris Nikitin: Der unzuverlässige Zeuge, in: Boris Nikitin u.a. (Hg.): Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit. Materialband zum zeitgenössischen Dokumentarischen Theater, Berlin 2014, S. 12-19.
[11] So Tobias Becker und Wolfgang Höbel: “Wir kommen mit unserer Wut”, in: Der Spiegel, 50 (2008), S. 176-179.
[12] Blogpräsenz von “Aus den Akten auf die Bühne”, Bericht Projektreihe/Die Idee, URL: http://www.sprechende-akten.de/ (letzter Zugriff am 03.04.2016).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Please, stay off the stage. © Matthew Baldwin 2015 (via flickr)

Empfohlene Zitterweise
Gundermann, Christine: Geschichte auf der Bühne: Neues vom Geschichtstheater. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 24, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6440.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 26
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6440

Tags: , , ,

2 replies »

  1. Sehr geehrte Frau Gundermann,

    Ihren Aufruf zu mehr Theaterkritiken können wir nur unterstützen.

    Ihr Artikel zeigt sehr treffend, dass in dieser Art Geschichtsvermittlung noch viel Potential liegt, darüber hinaus noch wenig konkrete Forschung betrieben wird.

    Was unsere Herangehensweise betrifft, so fand ich Ihre Aussagen besonders zutreffend, dass “gerade die Personalunion von DarstellerInnen und ExpertInnen durchaus zu einem neuen Modus des Historismus führ[e] und “das sich Zuschauende doch immer wieder fragen können”.

    Eben diese Selbstreflexion ist stets unser Ziel. Wir wollen eben keinen “erhobenen Zeigefinger” und auch keine “endgültige Wahrheit” zeigen. Dennoch, und das ist stets unser Anspruch, wollen wir die Dokumente sprechen lassen, allerdings auf glaubwürdige und nachvollziehbare Weise. Ich rede hiervon ganz gern von einer “Quellenkritik Live!”, denn das Publikum wird Zeuge eines Forschungsprozesses, sieht wie HistorikerInnen arbeiten. Dies wurde auch von der üblicherweise sehr kritischen Forschungsgemeinde wohlwollend aufgenommen.

    Eben eine eigene Denkleistung des Publikums abzufordern wurde uns desöfteren positiv bescheinigt. Das Publikum, so unsere Erfahrung, will gefordert werden, selbst denken. Die Konfrontation mit den historischen Akten, Aussagen und Akteuren geschieht unmittelbar, direkt am historischen Ort.

    Eine Frage hätte ich dennoch, was ist konkret mit “neuem Modus des Historismus” gemeint? Dies klingt fast danach, als würde unsere Herangehensweise über einen praxeologischen Ansatz hinausgehen?

    Mit freundlichen Grüßen,
    Olaf Löschke

  2. Very interesting post. I’m afraid I cannot comment on Olaf Löschke’s reply as my German is rusted. What I like with history theater is the connection between living history, interaction between actors, and performing arts. I was not aware of those German examples. I know David Dean has published “Theatre: A Neglected Site of Public History?” in 2012[1] and History, Memory, Performance in 2015.[2] That would be great to have a panel (even a performance) at the next conference of the International Federation for Public History (Italy, June 2017). Again, very interesting.

    References
    [1] Dean, David. Theatre: A Neglected Site of Public History? In: The Public Historian, Vol. 34 (2012), No. 3, pp. 21-39, https://www.academia.edu/3703177/Theatre_A_Neglected_Site_of_Public_History (Last accessed 12 August 2016).
    [2] Dean, David, Yana Meerzon und Kathryn Prince (eds.): History, Memory, Performance. London 2015, http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137393883 (Last accessed 12 August 2016).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest