A Musical as Public History: “District Six”

Ein Musical als Public History: “District Six”

 


District Six: The Musical (1987) is arguably South Africa’s most popular musical.[1] It was followed by a number of spin off musicals on the same theme, the most recent of which is a reprise, District Six Kanala [Please], currently completing a run in Cape Town.[2] It is, however, far more than a musical.

 

District Six

Cape Town’s District Six came into being in the 1840s, as the original town between the sea and Table Mountain expanded residentially towards the east. It became an inner city neighbourhood, home to a very diverse population, as waves of immigrants found their first homes there. By the mid-twentieth century, it had become run-down and known for its gangs. It became a target for the National Party government’s Group Areas Act (1950), which reserved areas in cities for whites only. In 1966, it was declared a “white group area”, and 60 000, mainly classified “coloured” people [of mixed race], were forcibly removed and re-settled in areas many kilometres from the centre of the city. All the buildings except churches, mosques and some schools were bulldozed.

Little had been done to the area by 1986. It was largely an urban wasteland, a great gaping wound in the city. District Six was only one of many areas in Cape Town’s southern suburbs from which communities were forcibly removed, but it was by far the largest removal and it came to iconically represent all the others. In a memoir, Noor Ebrahim sums up what so many felt,

“The day I left our house in District Six, never to return, I knew my life had changed forever. In bitterness and anger, I accepted what was inevitable … We were ordinary people living a rich and satisfying life. We cared for each other and about each other. And, when it ended, I knew that my life had changed forever.”[3]

District Six: The Musical

First released at the end of 1986, the album and the radio play–a collaboration between David Kramer and Taliep Petersen–were created during a very dark period of Apartheid history. A new national state of emergency was declared in June. Boycotts and stayaways characterised everyday life within South Africa and incursions and hostilities continued against countries on the northern borders.[4] The music, however, struck a chord. It captured both the language and the sentiment of the people of District Six, with the distinctive rhythms of the Kaapse Klopse (Cape New Year carnival troops) and lyrics that managed to combine the humour and the pathos that was unique to the lives of people:[5]

The rhythm and the beat of the people all around.
Klop, klop, beating out the rhythm,
Klop, klop, a rhythm that is living – it’s the heart that beats in District Six (‘The Heart of District Six’)

The other night I had a nightmare
I went to hell and the devil was there
He looked at me and he said,
“It’s alright, you can go,
‘Cos this place of mine is reserved for whites” (‘The law, the law’)

These seven steps bear witness.
Can these stone steps forgive?
The people who destroyed our homes
And told us where to live?…
The children will revenge us
For better or for worse…
For they, too, have been broken
And scattered like the bricks,
The stones, cement and concrete that once was District Six (‘Seven Steps of Stone’)

When the south-easter blows, we will remember
Wherever we go District Six…
When the south-easter blows in a street called Hanover
They will reap what they sow District Six (‘When the South-Easter blows’)

The role of music

Unlike much music that echoes historical elements (accurately or inaccurately) in its lyrics, District Six: The Musical actually created popular history from a previous void. The deep trauma of forced removal and relocation had severed the former inhabitants from both the physical and the mental space that had been District Six. The musical made it possible to engage with the memories again and not only to revive them, but to re-create a culture and a pride among people who had lost so much. One father said that the musical had enabled him to tell his children about his life in District Six – something he’d not been able to do before the musical. As the authors of David Kramer’s biography describe,

“in the musical it is the voice of the community that prevails and calls for remembrance, and the production certainly managed to make the experience of the audience a properly ‘collective’ one … [f]or many coloured spectators, it was all about recognition, association and identification – catharsis in its most basic form.”[6]

As public history, the musical has a range of characteristics. One of the most prominent is that it has proved to be enduring, as the spin-offs and the repeated productions of it constantly demonstrate. It lives on in schools, where it is often performed and where recordings of it are routinely watched in history classes. In an unusual complementarity, David Kramer was influenced in the writing of the musical by Richard Reeve’s novel, Buckingham Palace District Six (1986),[7] while the subsequent success of the musical enhanced the popularity of the book, which became routinely prescribed literature studied at school. The imprinting of the words of the songs on the mind is as strong, if not stronger, than the imprint of iconic pictures, physical memorials and historical sites. Equally important was the great impetus that the musical provided for District Six to be properly commemorated. The District Six Museum Foundation was established in 1989, after a 1988 campaign, “Hands off District Six”, and the museum itself was opened in 1994.[8]

An unreachable place

The music had the purpose of bringing to life and to remembrance the history of ordinary people and their experience of District Six: fruit and vegetable sellers, a blind man, a homeless boy of nine, a newspaper seller, a laundry woman. It also described everyday scenes, including the call to prayer of a mosque and messages of a street preacher, activities of the “Sexy Boys” gang, the New Year celebration and benches and amenities reserved for “Whites Only”. Beyond these sketches, David Kamer regarded District Six as doing far more, for, within the context of Apartheid, it “humanised the coloured people.”[9]

As Sofie Geschier has noted[10] with regard to the District Six Museum, imagination is the key to working with the memory of District Six and it’s this that the musical enables. Seeing streets and people where none exist any longer, being transported into their world with some degree of accuracy, given the care with which the composers worked[11], and being able to see again beyond the bleak horizons of many of Cape Town’s present suburbs and townships is what it conveys. Geschier also observes that a result of this might be that old District Six is seen as a “good place”, which, for younger generations, might be “an unreachable place”[12]. Such is the risk of creating history through a musical. It is, however, a risk that many would say was more than worth taking.

________________________

Further Literature

  • Bickford-Smith, Vivian, van Heyningen, Elizabeth and Worden, Nigel (1999) Cape Town in the twentieth century. Cape Town: David Philip.
  • De Villiers, Dawid and Slabbert, Mathilda (2011) David Kramer. A biography. Cape Town: Tafelberg.
  • Rassool, Ciraj and Prosalendis, Sandra (eds.) (2001) Recalling Community in Cape Town. Cape Town: District Six Museum Foundation.

Web Resources

________________________

[1] The show ran from April 1987 until 1990, playing over 550 performances seen by around 350,000 people, http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2016-02-14-district-six-kanala-commemorating-the-void-that-still-remains/ (Last accessed 30.5.2016).
[2] Playing at the Fugard Theatre on the edge of District 6, http://www.thefugard.com/whats-on/currently-on/item/district-six-kanala (Last accessed 30.5.2016).
[3] Ebrahim, Noor (1999) Noor’s Story: My life in District Six. Cape Town: District Six Museum.
[4] SA History Online: General South African History Timeline: 1900s, http://www.sahistory.org.za/1900s/1980s (Last accessed 30.5.2016).
[5] The music: Remember District six? Playable MP3s (https://soulsafari.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/remember-district-6/ (Last accessed 30.5.2016).
[6] De Villiers, Dawid and Slabbert, Mathilda (2011) David Kramer. A biography, 228.
[7] Reeve, Richard (1986) Buckingham Palace District Six. Cape Town: David Philip.
[8] See the Museum website, http://www.districtsix.co.za/Content/Museum/About/Info/index.php (Last accessed 30.5.2016).
[9] Quoted by Paula Fourie in a paper, “Musical negotiation of segregated place in Cape Town: District Six: The Musical”, https://joebennett.net/2013/06/28/iaspm-day-5-musical-negotiation-of-segregated-place-in-cape-town-district-six-the-musical-paula-fourie-iaspm2013/ (Last accessed 30.5.2016).
[10] Geschier, Sofie (2007) ‘So there I sit in a Catch-22 situation’: remembering and imagining trauma in the District Six Museum. In: Field, Sean, Meyer, Renate and Swanson, Felicity Imagining the city: memories and cultures in Cape Town, 37-56. Cape Town: HSRC Press. (Download: http://www.hsrcpress.ac.za/product.php?productid=2193&freedownload=1 (Last accessed 30.5.2016)), pp.45-46.
[11] De Villiers, Dawid and Slabbert, Mathilda (2011) David Kramer. A biography, pp.214-220.
[12] Geschier (2007:50).

____________________
Image Credits
District Six Museum, 28.4.2015 @ Kaospilot Outpost Cape Town (via flickr).

Recommended Citation
Siebörger, Rob: Music as public history. District Six. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 22, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5169.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

District Six: The Musical (1987) ist wohl Südafrikas populärstes Musical.[1] Es folgte einer Reihe von verwandten Musicals zum gleichen Thema, wovon das neueste, District Six Kanala [kanala = please = bitte], eine Art Wiederholung ist, dessen Spielzeit momentan in Kapstadt zu Ende geht.[2] Allerdings ist District Six Kanala viel mehr als ein Musical.

 

District Six

Kapstadts District Six wurde in den 40er Jahren des 19. Jahrhunderts begründet, als die Wohngebiete der ursprünglichen Stadt, zwischen dem Meer und dem Tafelberg gelegen, sich nach Osten ausbreiteten. Es wurde ein innerstädtisches Viertel mit einer sehr durchmischten Bevölkerung, da verschiedene Gruppen von Einwanderern ihre ersten Wohnungen dort fanden. Bis zur Mitte des 20. Jahrhunderts war das Quartier zu einer heruntergekommenen Gegend geworden, die vor allem für seine kriminellen Banden bekannt war. Das Quartier wurde zum Gegenstand für den Group Areas Act (1950) der südafrikanischen Regierung; ein Gesetz, das bestimmte städtische Areale nur für Weiße vorbehielt. Im Jahre 1966 wurde das Quartier zu einer “white group area” deklariert und 60 000 hauptsächlich “klassifizierte Farbige” wurden zwangsweise ausgewiesen und in neue Gebiete umgesiedelt, die viele Kilometer vom Stadtzentrum entfernt lagen. Sämtliche Gebäude mit Ausnahmen von Kirchen, Moscheen und einigen Schulen wurden dem Erdboden gleichgemacht.

Bis 1986 geschah wenig in dem Areal. Es war überwiegend eine städtische Brache, eine riesige offene Wunde in der Stadt. District Six war nur eine von vielen Gegenden in den südlichen Vororten Kapstadts, aus welchen Lebensgemeinschaften gewaltsam entfernt wurden. Aber der District war bei weitem der größte, und er wurde der ikonische Stellvertreter für alle anderen ähnlichen Gebiete. In einer Denkschrift fasste Noor Ebrahim das zusammen, was so viele fühlten:

“An dem Tag, als ich unser Haus in District Six verließ, um nie wieder zurück zu kehren, wusste ich, dass sich mein Leben für immer verändert hatte. Mit Bitterkeit und Wut nahm ich das Unumkehrbare an … Wir waren normale Menschen, die ein reiches und befriedigendes Leben lebten. Wir kümmerten uns um uns und sorgten füreinander. Und, als es vorbei war, wusste ich, dass sich mein Leben für immer verändert hatte.“[3]

District Six: das Musical

Ende 1986 erschien District Six zunächst als Album und als Hörspiel (eine Kollaboration zwischen David Kramer und Taliep Petersen). Das Musical entstand folglich während einer besonders dunklen Periode der Geschichte der Apartheid. Im Juni des gleichen Jahres wurde neuerlich ein nationaler Ausnahmezustand ausgerufen. Boykotte und Arbeitsverweigerungen (in Form von Nicht-Erscheinen am Arbeitsplatz) charakterisierten das tägliche Leben in Südafrika. Zugleich hielten Übergriffe wie auch Kampfhandlungen gegen Staaten an der Nordgrenze weiter an.[4] Die Musik aber traf einen Nerv. Sie ergriff sowohl die Sprache wie auch die Stimmung der Menschen des District Six mit den unverwechselbaren Rhythmen der Kaapse Klopse (Karnevalgruppen beim Neujahrsfest am Kap) und mit Songtexten, die es schafften, Humor und Pathos in jener Form zu kombinieren, die das Leben der Menschen einzigartig machte:[5]

The rhythm and the beat of the people all around.
Klop, klop, beating out the rhythm,
Klop, klop, a rhythm that is living – it’s the heart that beats in District Six (‘The Heart of District Six’)

The other night I had a nightmare
I went to hell and the devil was there
He looked at me and he said,
“It’s alright, you can go,
‘Cos this place of mine is reserved for whites” (‘The law, the law’)

These seven steps bear witness.
Can these stone steps forgive?
The people who destroyed our homes
And told us where to live?…
The children will revenge us
For better or for worse…
For they, too, have been broken
And scattered like the bricks,
The stones, cement and concrete that once was District Six (‘Seven Steps of Stone’)

When the south-easter blows, we will remember
Wherever we go District Six…
When the south-easter blows in a street called Hanover
They will reap what they sow in District Six (‘When the South-Easter blows’)

Die Rolle der Musik

In Gegensatz zu anderer Musik, die in den Texten historische Elemente mehr oder weniger genau wiedergibt, erzeugte District Six: The Musical tatsächlich populäre Geschichte aus einer früheren Leerstelle. Das tiefe Trauma der erzwungenen Abschiebung und Umsiedlung trennte die früheren BewohnerInnen von dem physischen wie auch mentalen Raum, der einmal District Six gewesen war. Das Musical machte es möglich, mit den Erinnerungen wieder Kontakt aufzunehmen und sie nicht nur wieder zu beleben, sondern auch eine Kultur und einen Stolz unter den Menschen zu erschaffen, die so viel verloren hatten. Ein Vater sagte, das Musical habe es ihm ermöglicht, seinen Kindern von seinem Leben in District Six zu erzählen – vor dem Musical konnte er dies nicht. Wie die Autoren der Biographie David Kramers beschreiben:

“In dem Musical ist es die Stimme der Gemeinschaft, die vorherrscht und zur Erinnerung aufruft, und die Produktion hat es definitiv geschafft, die Erfahrung der ZuschauerInnen zu einer echten Kollektiverfahrung zu machen … [f]ür viele der Farbigen unter den ZuschauerInnen ging es um Anerkennung, Anbindung und Identifikation – Katharsis in ihrer elementarsten Form.“[6]

Als Public History hat das Musical eine Reihe von Besonderheiten. Eine der bedeutendsten ist, dass es sich als dauerhaft erwiesen hat, wie die vielen Wiederholungen und die Produktion von verwandten Musicals ständig beweisen. Es lebt weiter in Schulen, wo es oft gespielt wird und wo Aufnahmen davon regelmäßig im Geschichtsunterricht gezeigt werden. In einer ungewöhnlichen Komplementarität wurde einerseits David Kramer beim Schreiben des Musicals durch den Roman Buckingham Palace District Six (1986)[7] von Richard Reeve beeinflusst und andererseits hat der Erfolg des Musicals die Popularität des Buchs gesteigert, so dass es zur Pflichtlektüre in den Schulen wurde. Der Eindruck der Songtexte auf das Gemüt ist genau so stark, wenn nicht stärker, wie der Eindruck ikonischer Bilder, physischer Denkmäler und historischer Orte. Genau so wichtig war die große Triebkraft, die das Musical für eine angemessene Erinnerung an District Six entfaltete. Die District Six Museum-Stiftung wurde im Jahr 1989 gegründet, nach einer Kampagne unter dem Titel “Hände weg vom District Six” im Jahr 1988. Das Museum selbst wurde 1994 eröffnet.[8]

Ein unerreichbarer Ort

Die Musik hatte den Zweck, die Geschichte der normalen Menschen und ihre Erfahrungen im District Six zum Leben zu erwecken und in Erinnerung zu rufen: Obst- und GemüsehändlerInnen, ein blinder Mann, ein neunjähriger obdachloser Junge, ein Zeitungsverkäufer, eine Wäscherin. Es beschrieb auch alltägliche Szenen, darunter der Ruf zum Gebet einer Moschee und Botschaften eines Straßenpredigers, die Aktivitäten der “Sexy Boys”-Bande, die Neujahrsfeier sowie Sitzbänke und Einrichtungen, die “nur für Weiße” bestimmt waren. Jenseits dieser kurzen Schilderungen erreichte nach Meinung David Kamers District Six viel mehr, da es im Kontext der Apartheid “die Farbigen humanisierte”.[9]

Wie Sofie Geschier in Bezug auf das District Six Museum angemerkt hat,[10] ist die Vorstellungskraft der Schlüssel zur Arbeit mit der Erinnerung an District Six und genau dies ermöglicht das Musical. Straßen und Menschen zu sehen, wo keine mehr existieren, das Eintauchen in diese Welt mit jenem gewissen Grad von Genauigkeit, die angesichts der Sorgfalt, mit der die Komponisten arbeiteten[11] möglich wird, und in die Lage versetzt zu werden, über die trostlosen Perspektiven von zahlreichen Vororten und Townships des heutigen Kapstadts hinausblicken zu können – all dies leistet dieses Musical. Geschier stellt auch fest, dass ein mögliches Ergebnis des Musicals ist, dass das alte District Six als ein “guter Ort” wahrgenommen werden könnte, der für jüngere Generationen dann möglicherweise zu einem “unerreichbaren Ort” wird.[12] So etwas gehört zum Risiko, Geschichte durch ein Musical zu erzeugen. Es ist allerdings ein Risiko, das sich nach Meinung vieler mehr als gelohnt hat.

________________________

Literatur

  • Bickford-Smith, Vivian u.a.: Cape Town in the twentieth century. Kapstadt 1999.
  • De Villiers, Dawid / Slabbert, Mathilda: David Kramer. A biography. Kapstadt 2011.
  • Rassool, Ciraj / Prosalendis, Sandra (Hrsg.): Recalling Community in Cape Town. Kapstadt 2001.

Webressourcen

________________________

[1] Das Musical lief von April 1987 bis 1990 mit mehr als 550 Aufführungen und wurde von ca. 350 000 Menschen gesehen, http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2016-02-14-district-six-kanala-commemorating-the-void-that-still-remains/ (Letzter Zugriff 30.5.2016).
[2] Es spielt am Fugard Theater am Rande von District Six, http://www.thefugard.com/whats-on/currently-on/item/district-six-kanala (Letzter Zugriff 30.5.2016).
[3] Ebrahim, Noor (1999) Noor’s Story: My life in District Six. Cape Town: District Six Museum.
[4] SA History Online: General South African History Timeline: 1900s, http://www.sahistory.org.za/1900s/1980s (Letzter Zugriff 30.5.2016).
[5] The music: Remember District six? Playable MP3s (https://soulsafari.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/remember-district-6/ (Letzter Zugriff 30.5.2016).
[6] De Villiers, Dawid and Slabbert, Mathilda (2011) David Kramer. A biography, 228.
[7] Reeve, Richard (1986) Buckingham Palace District Six. Cape Town: David Philip.
[8] See the Museum website, http://www.districtsix.co.za/Content/Museum/About/Info/index.php (Letzter Zugriff 30.5.2016).
[9] Zitiert durch Paula Fourie in einer Arbeit, “Musical negotiation of segregated place in Cape Town: District Six: The Musical”, siehe https://joebennett.net/2013/06/28/iaspm-day-5-musical-negotiation-of-segregated-place-in-cape-town-district-six-the-musical-paula-fourie-iaspm2013/ (Letzter Zugriff 30.5.2016).
[10] Geschier, Sofie (2007) ‘So there I sit in a Catch-22 situation’: remembering and imagining trauma in the District Six Museum. In: Field, Sean, Meyer, Renate and Swanson, Felicity Imagining the city: memories and cultures in Cape Town, 37-56. Cape Town: HSRC Press. (Download: http://www.hsrcpress.ac.za/product.php?productid=2193&freedownload=1), pp.45-46.
[11] De Villiers, Dawid and Slabbert, Mathilda (2011) David Kramer. A biography, pp.214-220.
[12] Geschier (2007:50).

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

District Six Museum, 28.4.2015 @ Kaospilot Outpost Cape Town (via flickr).

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Siebörger, Rob: Ein Musical als Public History: “District Six”. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 22, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5169.

Übersetzung durch Jana Kaiser: kaiser (at) academic-texts (dot) de

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 22
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6332

Tags: , ,

Pin It on Pinterest