Decoding Da Vinci? A Public History Affair

Da Vinci entschlüsseln? Eine geschichtskulturelle Affäre


 

 


The Da Vinci Code[1] was a work of fiction, but significant public interest in its claim to be drawing on a hidden history of Christianity forced agents of the Catholic Church, and scholars within the academy, to challenge the book’s historical and theological errors.[2]

Media claim to historicity

Australia’s own Da Vinci Code moment occurred almost a decade earlier, when Helen Darville[3] won three of the nation’s most prestigious literary prizes for a work of fiction she pretended was based on family stories of the Holocaust.[4] The authorial identity hoax, the false claims to historicity, and the novel’s apparent anti-Semitism, won it notoriety.[5] Does the public reaction to false claims of historicity have any significance for history didactics? I take historicity to be concerned with claims for the historical actuality, authenticity or factuality of representations of the past. Historical representations arising within and across various media have varying degrees of reliability as historical accounts, and may be artefacts of rigorous scholarship executed within recognisable traditions of historiography, but are just as likely to be the products of a commercial imagination with little respect for disciplinary rigor or forms. If we follow Frank Ankersmit, then by definition histories are narratives that always exceed the sum of their referential (or factual) statements.[6]

The author’s authority

This problem takes on a particular character in contemporary postmodern culture, where the line between fact and fiction in historical work has been questioned,[7] and is often deliberately blurred in reality television, mocumentaries, news broadcasts, historical films, and those novels which claim that what they depict is based on rigorous historical scholarship when it isn’t (such as The Da Vinci Code), or falsely claim some form of credible identity for their author, which legitimates them as an authority (for example, the claim to an authentic ethnic voice, as happened in the Demidenko affair). For Jean Baudrillard, [8] it is as if reality and representation have imploded, leaving us with only an endless array of simulations that have supplanted any reality they were once intended to depict. In the Da Vinci Code case, the public came to ‘buy’ Brown’s claims that his narrative drew on a secret history, compelling religious and academic authorities (as mentioned above) to point out the theological and historical inaccuracies in his tale. It is hard to know what impact this institutional dismissal of Brown’s claims to historicity have had on the public reception of his ideas. That such authorities were compelled to respond to a novelist’s fictions is significant, and reveals something about the perceived public acceptance of Brown’s ideas at the time. Somehow the fictional construction of the author’s authority (through a list of acknowledgements to various research organisations, and his explicit claims that the background to the novel was based on historical fact) worked to provide the ideas in the text with a historicity they did not deserve.

A postmodern scandal

In the Demidenko case, it was clear that the literary establishment was left embarrassed by the revelations that Helen Darville had assumed a false ethnic identity, particularly since they had been the vehicle that showcased her adornment of a Ukrainian embroided blouse and recorded her public display of Ukrainian folk dancing at author interviews, both of which they now realized had been contrived to sell the authenticity of her ethnic voice. More importantly, her claims to Ukrainian ancestry had given her text an authenticity that was later lost when the voice that was speaking was recognized as no longer culturally genuine. The media frenzy around this revelation may have a lot to do with the way her novel appeared to empathize with the anti-Semitism of its Ukrainian protagonists, which now seemed illegitimate, given the “recorded voices” had no relationship to actual participants or eye-witnesses of the events described. Of course, Darville’s deception may be no problem for certain species of the postmodern literary critic, but it was a scandal for the media (who had obviously been duped themselves), as the source of a truth-claim does ultimately matter for a journalist attempting to engage in factual reporting, just as it does for the historian.

So what does this all mean for history education?

When we think about what should go into a school History curriculum, we inevitability come up with a list of important historical events that have shaped our national and global pasts. Debates over school history curricula almost always centre on whose history is being taught; the amount of curriculum space allocated to specific topics; or the relative weight given to skills versus content. The syllabus topics themselves typically form an authoritative list of the significant events to be addressed in the classroom. But where is public history in these authoritative lists? Do public history “events” like the Demidenko affair, or the Da Vinci controversy, ever make it into the school curriculum? What might the school curriculum look like if students were asked to engage directly with these controversial case studies of disputes within public history discourse? Although public history doesn’t seem to play any direct part in the new Australian Curriculum: History, I did note during a sojourn in Sweden, that “uses of history” is a key focus of Sweden’s mandatory history curriculum,[9] and it is under this rubric that public history finds a niche. Could controversies over the historicity of public texts, like the two cases I have explored, be useful to study? Surely, studying such “events” would help prepare history students to engage with the various forms of conspiracy theory, hagiography, historical denial, national mythology, historical fiction, and official histories they will encounter in their everyday life. While it’s important to know about the significant events of the national and global past that have shaped the world we live in, controversies in public history provide a rich opportunity for exploring what counts as trustworthy in the everyday histories we encounter. They also allow us to raise questions about what makes the public believe a history is authentic, and the complex role of authorship (both literally and symbolically) in establishing the authority and credibility of an historical account. Does the institutional concern with the historicity of The Da Vinci Code, and the Australian public’s outrage over the Demidenko affair, suggest an important place for explorations of public history in the classroom?

____________________

Literature

  • Maggie Nolan & Carrie Dawson. (Eds.). Hoaxes, Imposture and Identity Crises in Australian Literature. Australian Literary Studies, Vol.21, No.4. University of Queensland 2004.
  • Jerome de Groot. (Ed.). Consuming History: Historians and heritage in contemporary popular culture. London: Routledge 2009.

External links

____________________

[1] Dan Brown. The Da Vinci Code. Berkley: Doubleday 2003.
[2] For Catholic responses, see the article “Offensive against ‘Da Vinci’,” New York Times, April 28, 2006. Available Online: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/28/world/europe/28iht-rome.html?_r=0 (last accessed 12.04.2015) and the Q&A material on the website “Catholic Answers,” available online: http://www.catholic.com/documents/cracking-the-da-vinci-code (last accessed 12.04.2015). For an academic response, see: B. D. Ehrman. Truth and fiction in the Da Vinci Code: A historian reveals what we really know about Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and Constantine. Oxford: Oxford University Press 2004. Any quick search will turn up a wealth of historical and theological criticism from a variety of sources.
[3] The author falsely was claiming Ukrainian heritage as novelist “Helen Demidenko.” The debates at the time were quite intense, and spurred a great deal of academic attention. See for example: Stephen Wheatcroft. (Ed.). Genocide, history and fictions: Historians respond to Helen Demidenko/Darville’s The hand that signed the paper. University of Melbourne 1997. Interestingly, Helen Dale (nee Darville aka Demidenko) has recently been in the news again, becoming an adviser to an Australian Senator. See Jane Norman. Senator David Leyonhjelm hires controversial author Helen Dale (Demidenko) as an adviser. ABC News, 10 September 2014. Available Online: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-10/david-leyonhjelm-hires-author-once-known-as-helen-demidenko/5733790 (last accessed 12.04.2015).
[4] Malcolm Knox, “The Darville Made Me Do It”. Sydney Morning Herald, 9 July 2005. Available Online: http://www.smh.com.au/news/books/the-darville-made-me-do-it/2005/07/08/1120704550613.html (last accessed 12.04.2015).
[5] See, Robert Manne. “The strange case of Helen Demidenko.” Australian Humanities Review, Issue 1, April-June 1996. Available Online: http://www.australianhumanitiesreview.org/archive/demidenko/manne.1.html (last accessed 12.04.2015).
[6] Frank R. Ankersmit. Historical representation. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press 2001.
[7] There are many examples, but a few of the most striking are: Ann Curthoys, & John Docker. Is history fiction? Sydney: University of New South Wales Press 2006; Keith Jenkins. Refiguring history: New thoughts on an old discipline. London: Routledge 2003; and Hayden White. Figural realism: Studies in the mimesis effect. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press 1999.
[8] See Jean Baudrillard. The gulf war did not take place (P. Patton, Trans.). Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press 1995. In this book, Baudrillard claims that for most of us the Gulf War we experienced was a televisual simulation that has replaced any reality it claimed to represent.
[9] The Swedish National Agency for Education. (2012). GY11 History Syllabus.  Sweden: Skolverket. Available Online: http://www.skolverket.se/polopoly_fs/1.174546!/Menu/article/attachment/History.pdf (last accessed 13.04.2015).

____________________

Image Credits
© Leonardo da Vinci, Vitruvian Man. Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain.

Recommended Citation
Parkes, Robert: Decoding Da Vinci? A Public History Affair. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 14, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3979.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

The Da Vinci Code – im deutschsprachigen Raum bekannt als ‘Das Sakrileg’ –[1] ist ein fiktionales Werk, aber das enorme öffentliche Interesse an seinem Anspruch, eine verborgene Geschichte des Christentums nachzuzeichnen, nötigte die Katholische Kirche und auch Wissenschaftler, die historischen und theologischen Fehler des Buches anzufechten.[2]

Medialer Anspruch auf Historizität

In Australien gab es bereits ein Jahrzehnt früher einen solchen Da-Vinci-Code-Moment, als Helen Darville[3] für ihr Werk, das auf einer Familiengeschichte während des Holocausts basiert, mit drei der renommiertesten Literaturpreise des Landes ausgezeichnet wurde.[4] Die erschwindelte Identität der Autorin, falsche Behauptungen zur Historizität und offensichtlicher Antisemitismus verhalfen dem Roman zu trauriger Berühmtheit.[5] Hat die öffentliche Reaktion auf fehlerhafte Historizität Auswirkungen auf die Geschichtsdidaktik? Ich nehme Historizität zum Anlass, über die Forderungen nach historischer Wahrheit, Authentizität oder Faktizität bei den Repräsentationen der Vergangenheit besorgt zu sein. Historische Repräsentationen, die sich auf ein oder mehrere Medien stützen, haben unterschiedliche Grade der Zuverlässigkeit und können sich in historische Berichte oder unter Umständen auch Artefakte unterteilen, die selbst nach gründlicher Gelehrsamkeit innerhalb der bewährten Traditionen der Geschichtsschreibung entstanden sind, und sie können ebenso gut als Produkt einer kommerziellen Phantasie entstanden sein, mit nur wenig Respekt für die strengen Regeln der Disziplin. Wenn wir Frank Ankersmits Definition folgen, dann sind Geschichten Erzählungen, die stets die Summe ihrer referentiellen (oder Tatsachen-) Aussagen überschreiten.[6]

Die Autorität des Autors

Dieses Problem ist ein Indiz für eine bestimmte Entwicklung in der heutigen postmodernen Kultur, in der die Grenze zwischen Faktizität und Fiktion in der historischen Arbeit in Zweifel gezogen wird.[7] Sie wird verwischt durch Reality-Fernsehen, Dokumentationen, Nachrichtensendungen, historische Filme und Romane, die vorgeben, die in ihnen vorgetragenen Sachverhalte seien mit geschichtswissenschaftlichen Methoden erarbeitet worden, was in Wirklichkeit aber gar nicht zutrifft (wie bei The Da Vinci Code), oder fälschlicherweise behaupten, auf der glaubwürdigen Identität einer/s AutorIn zu beruhen, die sie dann als Autorität legitimiert (zum Beispiel durch den Anspruch auf eine authentische ethnische Stimme, wie es in der Demidenko-Affäre passiert ist). Für Jean Baudrillard[8] scheint es so, als ob Realität und Repräsentationen implodiert seien, sodass uns lediglich eine endlose Reihe von Nachahmungen bleibt, die den ursprünglichen Anspruch auf Realität längst verdrängt haben. Im Fall des Da Vinci Code “kaufte” die Öffentlichkeit Browns Behauptung “ab”, dass seine Erzählung auf einer geheimen Geschichte beruhe, was religiöse und akademische Autoritäten (wie bereits oben erwähnt) dazu nötigte, die theologischen und historischen Ungenauigkeiten in der Geschichte herauszustellen. Es ist schwer festzustellen, welche Auswirkungen diese institutionelle Abweisung von Browns Anspruch auf Historizität auf die öffentliche Rezeption seiner Ideen hatten. Dass diese Autoritäten dazu gezwungen waren, auf die Fiktion eines Romanciers zu reagieren, ist bedeutsam und bringt die seinerzeit wahrgenommene öffentliche Akzeptanz von Browns Ideen zum Vorschein. Irgendwie arbeitete die fiktionale Konstruktion der Autorität des Autors (belegt durch eine Liste von Anerkennungen durch diverse Forschungseinrichtungen und dem explizit erklärten Anspruch darauf, dass der Hintergrund der Geschichte auf historischen Tatsachen beruhe) dafür, dass den Ideen des Textes eine Historizität zugesprochen wurde, die ihnen nicht zukam.

Ein postmoderner Skandal

Im Fall Demidenko war es klar, dass das literarische Establishment durch die Entlarvung Helen Darvilles beschämt wurde, wonach sie eine falsche ethnische Identität angenommen habe. Dies traf umso mehr zu, weil dieses literarische Establishment es war, das ihre Ausschmückung mit einer ukrainisch bestickten Damenkleidung ausstellte und ihre öffentliche Zurschaustellung ukrainischer Volkstänze bei Autoreninterviews aufzeichnete. Beides war, wie das Establishment nun begriff, ersonnen, um die Authentizität ihrer ukrainischen Stimme zu beglaubigen. Hierbei ist am bedeutsamsten, dass der Anspruch auf ukrainische Herkunft ihrem Text eine Authentizität verlieh, die später verloren ging, als die Erzählerstimme nicht mehr länger als kulturell genuin gelten durfte. Der Medienrummel um diese Enthüllung hat wahrscheinlich viel mit der Art und Weise zu tun, mit der ihr Roman sich für den Antisemitismus des ukrainischen Protagonisten empathisch zu zeigen schien, was dann angesichts der Tatsache illegitim erschien, dass die aufgezeichneten Gespräche weder einen Bezug zu tatsächlich Beteiligten noch zu Augenzeugen hatten. Gewiss, Darvilles Täuschung mag kein Problem für bestimmte Arten postmoderner Literaturkritik sein, doch es war ein Medienskandal (die offensichtlich selbst betrogen worden waren), insofern die Quelle von Wahrheitsbehauptungen absolut wesentlich ist für eine/n JournalistIn, die/der sich der Tatsachenberichterstattung verpflichtet hat, und das Gleiche gilt für den/die HistorikerIn.

Was bedeutet dies nun für die geschichtsbezogene Bildung?

Wenn wir darüber nachdenken, was in das schulische Curriculum des Geschichtsunterrichts einfließen sollte, fällt uns unweigerlich eine Liste von historischen Ereignissen ein, die unsere nationale und globale Vergangenheit geprägt haben. Debatten über schulische Geschichtscurricula sind fast immer darauf ausgerichtet, wessen Geschichte gelehrt wird und welcher Lehrplanumfang welchen thematischen Bezügen eingeräumt wird; oder diese Debatten drehen sich um das relative Gewicht von Kompetenzen gegenüber den Inhalten. Die Lehrplanthemen stellen in der Regel eine maßgebliche Liste der bedeutenden Ereignisse dar, die im Unterricht behandelt werden sollten. Aber wo befindet sich die Public History in dieser maßgeblichen Liste? Schaffen es geschichtskulturelle ‘Ereignisse’ wie die Demidenko-Affäre oder die Da-Vinci-Kontroverse jemals, in den schulischen Curricula berücksichtigt zu werden? Wie würden die Schulcurricula aussehen, wenn die Lernenden selbst gebeten würden, kontroverse Fallstudien von Disputen aus dem geschichtskulturellen Kontext zu behandeln? Obwohl Public History-Themen im neuen australischen Schulcurriculum keine direkte Rolle spielen, habe ich während eines Aufenthalts in Schweden bemerkt, dass “angewandte Geschichte” ein Schwerpunkt des obligatorischen Lehrplans in Schweden darstellt,[9] und unter dieser Rubrik der Public History eine Nische beschert. Können Kontroversen über die Historizität von öffentlich diskutierten Texten, wie im Fall der zwei beschriebenen Beispiele, zum Lernen dienen? Sicherlich würde eine Untersuchung solcher ‘Ereignisse’ dazu dienen, die SchülerInnen im Geschichtsunterricht mit diversen Formen von Verschwörungstheorien, der Hagiographie, von historischen Verleugnungen, der nationalen Mythologie, historischer Fiktion und offizieller Geschichte zu konfrontieren, wie sie diese auch jederzeit im Alltag erleben werden. Zwar ist es wichtig, bedeutende Ereignisse der nationalen und globalen Geschichte zu kennen, die die Welt geprägt haben, in der wir leben, doch Kontroversen der Public History bieten eine Gelegenheit, das zu erkunden, was uns in der alltäglichen Begegnung mit Geschichte als vertrauenswürdig geboten wird. Diese Kontroversen ermöglichen es uns auch, Fragen darüber aufzuwerfen, was die Öffentlichkeit glauben macht, eine Geschichte sei authentisch, und auch über die komplexe Rolle der Autorschaft (sowohl buchstäblich als auch symbolisch) bei der Etablierung von Autorität und Glaubwürdigkeit eines historischen Berichts. Deutet das institutionelle Interesse an der Historizität des Da Vinci Code und der Empörung der australischen Öffentlichkeit über die Demidenko-Affäre darauf hin, dass der Public History ein wichtiger Platz im Klassenzimmer zukommt?

____________________

Literatur

  • Nolan, Maggie / Dawson, Carrie (Hrsg.): Hoaxes, Imposture and Identity Crises in Australian Literature. In: Australian Literary Studies 21 (2004) 4.
  • de Groot, Jerome (Hrsg.): Consuming History: Historians and heritage in contemporary popular culture. London 2009.

Externe Links

____________________

[1] Dan Brown. The Da Vinci Code. Berkley: Doubleday 2003.
[2] In Bezug auf katholische Reaktionen vgl. den Artikel “Offensive against ‘Da Vinci'”. New York Times, April 28, 2006. Online verfügbar: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/28/world/europe/28iht-rome.html?_r=0 (zuletzt am 12.04.2015) sowie das Q&A Material auf der Website “Catholic Answers“, online verfügbar: http://www.catholic.com/documents/cracking-the-da-vinci-code (zuletzt am 12.04.2015). Als Beispiel einer akademischen Einlassung, vgl.: B. D. Ehrman. Truth and fiction in the Da Vinci Code: A historian reveals what we really know about Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and Constantine. Oxford: Oxford University Press 2004. Eine schnelle Recherche wird einen enormen Fundus an historischer und theologischer Kritik in einer Vielzahl von Quellen hervorbringen.
[3] Die Autorin beanspruchte fälschlicherweise ukrainische Herkunft als “Helen Demidenko”. Die Debatte wurde seinerzeit intensiv geführt und zog einige akademische Beachtung auf sich. Vgl. z.B.: Stephen Wheatcroft (Hrsg.): Genocide, history and fictions: Historians respond to Helen Demidenko/Darville’s The hand that signed the paper. University of Melbourne 1997. Interessanterweise war Helen Dale (geb. Darville alias Demidenko) erst kürzlich wieder in den Nachrichten, als sie zur Beraterin eines australischen Senators ernannt wurde. Vgl. Jane Norman. Senator David Leyonhjelm hires controversial author Helen Dale (Demidenko) as an adviser. ABC News, 10 September 2014. Online verfügbar: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-10/david-leyonhjelm-hires-author-once-known-as-helen-demidenko/5733790 (zuletzt am 12.04.2015).
[4] Malcolm Knox, “The Darville Made Me Do It”. Sydney Morning Herald, 9 July 2005. Online verfügbar: http://www.smh.com.au/news/books/the-darville-made-me-do-it/2005/07/08/1120704550613.html (zuletzt am 12.04.2015). Durch die falsche Autorenidentität, den falschen Anspruch auf Historizität und den offensichtlichen Antisemitismus gewann sie traurige Berühmtheit.
[5] Vgl. Robert Manne. “The strange case of Helen Demidenko”. Australian Humanities Review, Issue 1, April-June 1996. Online verfügbar: http://www.australianhumanitiesreview.org/archive/demidenko/manne.1.html (zuletzt am 12.04.2015).
[6] Frank R. Ankersmit: Historical representation. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press 2001.
[7] Es gibt dafür viele Belege, doch die herausragendsten sind: Ann Curthoys, & John Docker. Is history fiction? Sydney: University of New South Wales Press 2006; Keith Jenkins. Refiguring history: New thoughts on an old discipline. London: Routledge 2003; and Hayden White. Figural realism: Studies in the mimesis effect. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press 1999.
[8] Vgl. Jean Baudrillard. The gulf war did not take place (P. Patton, Trans.). Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press 1995. In diesem Buch behauptet Baudrillard, dass der Golfkrieg für die meisten von uns als eine Fernseh-Simulation erlebt wurde, die den Anspruch auf Darstellung von jedweder Realität eingebüßt hat.
[9] The Swedish National Agency for Education. (2012). GY11 History Syllabus.  Sweden: Skolverket Online verfügbar: http://www.skolverket.se/polopoly_fs/1.174546!/Menu/article/attachment/History.pdf (zuletzt am 13.04.2015).

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
© Leonardo da Vinci, Vitruvianischer Mensch. Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Parkes, Robert: Da Vinci entschlüsseln? Eine geschichtskulturelle Affäre. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 13, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3979.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 3 (2015) 14
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3979

Tags: , , , ,

4 replies »

  1. For an English version of this comment please scroll down.

    Robert Parkes‘ Beitrag zeigt einmal mehr: Die wahren Hohepriester der Klio sind nicht Historiker, sondern – was die direkte Verbreitung angeht – Filmproduzenten und – was die indirekte Wirkmächtigkeit betrifft – Romanautoren. Doch gibt es grundsätzlich Anlass, deswegen besorgt zu sein?
    Ich möchte hier einmal eine Lanze für Dan Brown brechen: Er schrieb einen historischen Roman, und ein historischer Roman ist bekanntlich “erstens ein Roman und zweitens keine Historie”.[1] Spätestens seit Cervantes‘ Don Quijote (1605) spielt das Genre mit dem Topos, eine authentische Geschichte zu erzählen – inklusive Überlieferungs- und Auffindungsgeschichte der angeblichen Urquelle mit Lücken und Übersetzungsfehlern. Glossar, historische Karten, fachwissenschaftliche Bibliografie und bisweilen sogar Fußnoten gehören seit Scott ebenfalls zum Schein vorgeblicher Wissenschaftlichkeit. Lesen wir auf der ersten Seite eines Romans “eine wahre Geschichte”, dann ist auch dies Teil des Spiels und wird durch den Hinweis „ein Roman“ wieder relativiert. Was aber ist von einer “relativ wahren” Geschichte zu halten? Hier beginnt es spannend zu werden: Gibt es nicht Wahrheiten, die auf einer Ebene jenseits detaillierter Faktentreue zum Tragen kommen? Können nicht die „großen Fragen“ für eine bestimmte Gegenwart wichtiger sein als historisch korrekte Details?[2]
    Um beim Da-Vinci-Code zu bleiben: Die dort berichtete Geschichte behauptet, dass es den Heiligen Gral tatsächlich gibt, und zwar in Form einer leiblichen Nachkommenschaft Jesu Christi, die von der Römischen Kirche verfolgt wird, da sie deren Machtanspruch durch ihre bloße Existenz bedroht. Dass diese These einen solchen Widerhall in der Gesellschaft findet, ist ein geschichtlich höchst interessantes Phänomen, das statt einer wissenschaftlichen Berichtigung eine nähere Betrachtung verdient. Denn die zweifellos faszinierende These vom sang real stammt nicht erst von Dan Brown. Vor ihm haben bereits Romane Peter Berlings das Thema aufgegriffen.[3] In aller pseudowissenschaftlichen Breite dargelegt wurde die Idee von Henry Lincoln, Michael Baigent und Richard Leigh,[4] die ihrerseits so tun, als wären sie als Erste auf diese vermeintliche Fährte gestoßen. Vor Ihnen hatte allerdings bereits der SS-Esoteriker Otto Rahn seinen Kreuzzug gegen den Gral verfasst,[5] in dem genau dieselbe These vertreten wird, die übrigens in Teilen auf provenzalische, mittelalterliche Überlieferungen verweisen kann. Die Parzival-Romane Chrétien de Troyes‘ (1180-1190) und Wolfram von Eschenbachs (1200-1210) sind ein Reflex auf sie.[6] Der Skandal ist also nicht nur ein postmoderner, sondern in seinem Kernbestand bereits viel älter und vielleicht gar symptomatisch für den Antagonismus zwischen geistlicher und weltlicher Macht in der Westlichen Welt.
    Und seien wir einmal ehrlich: Man muss kein Verschwörungstheoretiker sein um einzugestehen, dass wir von der Geschichte des frühen Christentums und vielen anderen Dingen, über die Dan Brown in seinem Roman schreibt, herzlich wenig sicher wissen.
    Solange sich ein Buch als „Roman“ ausweist, sollte man den Inhalt unaufgeregt als Inspirationsquelle nutzen können. Schüler müssen dies im Sinne von Pandels Gattungskompetenz lernen. Dass Geschichtskultur mittlerweile auch in Deutschland fester Bestandteil von Curricula und Schulgeschichtsbüchern ist, trägt dieser Einsicht Rechnung.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Alfred Döblin, Aufsätze zur Literatur, Olten/Freiburg i.Br. 1963, 169.
    [2] Tanja Kinkel, „Wie genau muss ein historischer Roman sein?“, in: Die Magie der Geschichte. Geschichtskultur und Museum, hrsg. von Martina Padberg u. Martin Schmidt, Bielefeld 2010, 77-84, hier 78f.
    [3] Peter Berling, Die Kinder des Gral. Bergisch Gladbach 1991; ders., Das Blut der Könige. Bergisch Gladbach 1993; ders., Die Krone der Welt. Bergisch Gladbach 1995; ders., Der schwarze Kelch. Bergisch Gladbach 1997.
    [4] Bekannt wurde die vom Aufschneider Pierre Plantard geschickt in die Welt gesetzte These durch Henry Lincoln, Michael Baigent und Richard Leigh, The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. London 1982 (dt. Der Heilige Gral und seine Erben. Ursprung und Gegenwart eines geheimen Ordens. Sein Wissen und seine Macht. Bergisch Gladbach 2004), das wiederum auf den von den Autoren gedrehten Dokumentarfilmen The Lost Treasure of Jerusalem? (1972), The Priest, the Painter and the Devil (1974) und The Shadows of the Templars (1979) beruht.
    [5] Otto Rahn, Kreuzzug gegen den Gral. Die Geschichte der Albigenser. Freiburg i.Br. 1933.
    [6] Vgl. auch die Legenda Aurea, eine Sammlung von Heiligenviten des Jacobus de Voragine (ca. 1230-1298).

    _____________________

    Robert Parkes’ contribution demonstrates, once again, that Clio’s true high priests are not historians, but rather – with respect to the direct distribution – film producers and – with respect to the indirect potency – authors of novels. But is this, basically, a cause for concern? Here, I would like to strike a blow for Dan Brown: he wrote a historical novel and it is common knowledge that a historical novel is, 
“firstly, a novel and, secondly, not history“.[1] Since the appearance of Cervantes’ Don Quijote (1605), at the very latest, the genre has played with the topos of telling an authentic story – including accounts of its transmission and the discovery of the presumed original source, with its gaps and mistakes in translation. Glossaries, historical maps, specialised bibliographies and, occasionally, even footnotes contribute, since the time of Scott, to the illusion of apparent scholarship. If, on the first page of a novel, we read “a true story”, then this is also part of the game that is then qualified by the reference to “a novel”. But what should we think about a “relatively true” story? This is where it starts to get interesting: aren’t there truths that become relevant at a level beyond detailed loyalty to facts? Can’t the “big questions” be more important, at a particular point in time, than historically correct details?[2] 
To return to The Da Vinci Code: The story claims that the Holy Grail actually does exist, in the form of a physical descendant of Jesus Christ, who is pursued by the Catholic Church because the mere presence of this person threatens the Church’s claim to power. The fact that this theory has evoked such an echo in the public is a highly interesting phenomenon that deserves to be scrutinised more closely, rather than be subjected to a scholarly correction/revision. The clearly fascinating theory of sang real did not first originate with Dan Brown. Peter Berling’s novels had already dealt with the topic.[3] Henry Lincoln, Michael Baigent, and Richard Leigh[4] presented the hypothesis in pseudo-academic detail and claim to be the first ones to have discovered this trail. However, and before them, Otto Rahn, an SS esoteric, penned his ‘Crusade Against the Grail’,[5] in which exactly the same hypothesis is presented. Parts of the hypothesis can, incidentally, be traced back to medieval Provençal lore. They are reflected in the Parsifal narratives of Chrétien de Troyes (1180-1190) and Wolfram von Eschenbach (1200-1210).[6] The scandal is, thus, not just a post-modern one but much older and may even be symptomatic for the antagonism between spiritual and secular power in the western world. And let’s be honest: one doesn’t have to be a conspiracy theorist to acknowledge that we have very little precise information about the early history of Christianity and many other things that Dan Brown touches on in his novel. As long as a book calls itself a “novel”, it should be possible to calmly use the contents as a source of inspiration. Students must learn to do this, in the sense of Pandel’s genre competence. This is recognised by the fact that, by now, historical culture is firmly anchored in German curricula and in history textbooks for schools.

    References
    [1] Alfred Döblin, Aufsätze zur Literatur, Olten/Freiburg i.Br. 1963, 169.

    [2] Tanja Kinkel, „Wie genau muss ein historischer Roman sein?“, in: Die Magie der Geschichte. Geschichtskultur und Museum, ed. by Martina Padberg a. Martin Schmidt, Bielefeld 2010, 77-84, here 78f.
    
[3] Peter Berling, Die Kinder des Gral. Bergisch Gladbach 1991; ders., Das Blut der Könige. Bergisch Gladbach 1993; ders., Die Krone der Welt. Bergisch Gladbach 1995; ders., Der schwarze Kelch. Bergisch Gladbach 1997.

    [4] Henry Lincoln, Michael Baigent, and Richard Leigh popularised the theory, which was cleverly planted by Pierre Plantard, a French con artist, in The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. London 1982. It is based on several documentaries filmed by the authors: The Lost Treasure of Jerusalem? (1972), The Priest, the Painter and the Devil (1974), and The Shadows of the Templars (1979). 

    [5] Otto Rahn, Kreuzzug gegen den Gral. Die Geschichte der Albigenser. Freiburg i.Br. 1933.
    
[6] See, the Legenda Aurea, a collection of Jacobus de Voragines “Heiligenviten” (ca. 1230-1298).

    • Thanks for your comments Felix. I don’t disagree with much that you say. However, if you read into my piece the intention that history education should be about challenging inaccuracies in historical novels or the like, then I think you may have misread my position. I am much more interested in what the public reaction to histories, particular ones that are misleading or inaccurate, says about the importance of historicity for the public. That’s why I also discussed the Demidenko affair, which so pointedly demonstrated that the public (or at least the media) were upset when they thought they had been duped, where they earlier had heaped praise on a novel they thought was historically accurate. I think such events (the public reaction) are worthy of study, as they reveal much about how the public engages with history. I am much less concerned that someone like Dan Brown gets his history wrong… which we do, in fact, know enough to be certain of. Sorry if that wasn’t clear.

  2. For an English version of this comment please scroll down.

    “Geschichtskulturelle Affären” in der Schule

    Populäre Geschichtspräsentationen, v.a. wenn sie bewusst fiktionale Elemente enthalten, können zu fehlerhafter Historizität und wissenschaftlich fragwürdigen Vorstellungen und Geschichtsbildern beitragen. Sie deshalb aus dem universitären Elfenbeinturm heraus naserümpfend oder aufgrund ihres Erfolges sogar neidvoll zu verteufeln, ist genauso fragwürdig wie ihre Wirkungsmacht zu relativieren und damit zu unterschätzen. Natürlich geht es, wie Hinz richtig behauptet, in historischen Romanen wie in Romanen allgemein (oft) im Kern um „große Fragen“ der Menschheit, und natürlich sind diese für eine bestimmte Gegenwart wichtiger als historische Details. Nichtsdestotrotz können genau diese historischen Details durch Hervorhebung, Weglassen und die Art und Weise, wie sie erzählt werden, zu einer bestimmten Vorstellung von Geschichte führen und bestimmte Geschichtsbilder tradieren.[1] Wer fordert, dass Romane wie Dan Browns Das Sakrileg (der meiner Meinung nach kein historischer Roman ist, da er nicht in der Vergangenheit spielt)[2] lediglich „unaufgeregt als Inspirationsquelle“ genutzt werden sollen, übersieht das didaktische Potential dieses Mediums. Leider zeigt sich diese Unterschätzung populärer Geschichtsdarstellungen auch in der Forschungsliteratur zu diesem Themenfeld, die größtenteils aus Allgemeinplätzen besteht. Der wichtigen Rolle als Vermittlungsinstanz im geschichtskulturellen Betrieb wird man dadurch aber nicht gerecht. Robert Parkes‘ Frage, ob die öffentliche Reaktion auf fehlerhafte Historizität Auswirkungen auf die Geschichtsdidaktik hat bzw. haben sollte, muss also eindeutig mit JA beantwortet werden. Das breite Interesse an geschichtlichen Themen sowie ihre öffentliche Diskussion sind eine wichtige Legitimationsbasis für die geschichtswissenschaftliche Forschung einerseits und das Unterrichtsfach Geschichte andererseits. Eine „geschichtskulturelle Affäre“ wie die Da-Vinci-Kontroverse ist doch gerade für mich als Geschichtslehrerin das Beste, was mir für meinen Unterricht passieren kann. Diese Form der „angewandten Geschichte“ ist eine hervorragende Art und Weise, Schülerinnen und Schüler zu motivieren und ihnen überhaupt begreiflich zu machen, warum ein souveräner Umgang mit historischem Wissen wichtig für ihr alltägliches Leben sein kann. Dass diese Art von Public History nicht zwischen zwei Buchdeckel eines standardisierten Schulbuchs passt, ist eine andere Geschichte und erfordert ein erhöhtes Engagement der Lehrkräfte. Die Tatsache, dass die akademische Kritik im Fall Dan Browns möglicherweise zu einer gesteigerten Aufmerksamkeit und öffentlichen Rezeption der historisch falschen Darstellungen geführt haben mag, sehe ich weniger kritisch als Parkes, weil davon ausgegangen werden kann, dass der Diskurs – wenn auch nur in Teilen – ebenfalls rezipiert wurde. Dies dürfte nicht nur den Anspruch von Romanautoren, Filmproduzenten etc. steigern und damit der Qualitätssteigerung dienen. Vielmehr könnte die Geschichtswissenschaft durch die Aufarbeitung gewisser Fehler oder das Aufzeigen fiktionaler Elemente einen wichtigen Beitrag für das interessierte Publikum solcher populären Darstellungsformen leisten. Denkbar wäre eine Art „wissenschaftlicher Anhang“ bspw. zu einem historischen Roman, der nicht vom Autor selbst, sondern extern und damit objektiv und kritisch verfasst wurde.

    Damit könnte ein breites, nichtwissenschaftliches Publikum auf der Basis einer motivierenden, populären Geschichtsdarstellung, die ruhig auch Fehler und Provokationen enthalten darf, an einem wissenschaftlich begleiteten Diskurs teilnehmen. Was wünscht man sich als Geschichtsdidaktikerin und Lehrerin mehr?

    Anmerkungen
    [1] In Anlehnung an Hayden White: Metahistory. Die historische Einbildungskraft im 19. Jahrhundert in Europa. Frankfurt a. M. 2008.
    [2] Hans Vilmar Geppert: Der Historische Roman. Geschichte umerzählt von Walter Scott bis zur Gegenwart. Tübingen 2009. S. 159.

    __________________________

    “Public History Affairs” in school

    Popular presentations of history, in particular if they deliberately contain fictional elements, can contribute to erroneous historicity and to scientifically questionable notions as well as symbols of history. Therefore, to demonize them from the academic ivory tower or even because of their success, is just as questionable as to relativize its impact and therefore to underestimate it. As Hinz rightfully claims, historic novels as well as novels in general (often) refer to the “important questions” of humanity and these of course are more important for a particular presence than historical details. Nevertheless, precisely these historical details and how they are told, whether highlighted or even left out, can lead to a certain perception of history and convey certain images of history.[1] Those who unexcitedly demand that novels such as Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code (which in my opinion is not a historical novel as it is not set in the past)[2] should only be seen as a source of inspiration, are overlooking the didactic potential of this medium. Unfortunately, this underestimation is also found in research literature on this topic, which largely consists of platitudes / generalities. This however does not fulfil the important role as a mediator in historical cultural operation. Robert Parkes’ question, whether the public response to erroneous historicity has or should have implications on historical didactics, must clearly be answered with YES. The wide interest in historical subjects and their public debate are an important basis of legitimacy for the scientific research on the one hand and the school subject history on the other. Being a history teacher, a “historical cultural affair” like the Da Vinci controversy is the best thing that can happen to me in school. This form of “applied history” is an excellent way to motivate students and to clarify for them why a qualified handling of historical knowledge can be important to their everyday lives. That this type of public history does not fit between the two covers of a standardized textbook is a different story and requires an increased commitment of teachers. I am less critical than Parkes when it comes to the fact that the academic reviews in Dan Brown’s case may have possibly led to increased attention of historical misrepresentations. It is safe to assume that the discussion was also received, even if only partially.

    This is likely to increase not only the claim of novelists, film producers, etc., and thus serve to increase quality. Much rather historical science could make an important contribution by reappraising potential errors or by highlighting of fictional elements to the interested audience of such popular historical representations. It could be an option to include a form of “scientific addendum” i.e. to historical novels, which would be composed not by the author but externally thus being objective and critical at the same time. Hence a broad, non-scientific audience would be able to take part in a scientifically monitored discussion on a motivating, popular presentation of history, which may even contain inaccurate and provocative statements. What more could a history didact and teacher wish for?

    References
    [1] Hayden White: Metahistory. Die historische Einbildungskraft im 19. Jahrhundert in Europa. Frankfurt a. M. 2008.
    [2]Hans Vilmar Geppert: Der Historische Roman. Geschichte umerzählt von Walter Scott bis zur Gegenwart. Tübingen 2009. p. 159.

    • Stefanie, thank you for your reply. I particularly like this point that you make, that the “Da Vinci controversy is the best thing that can happen to me in school. This form of “applied history” is an excellent way to motivate students and to clarify for them why a qualified handling of historical knowledge”. I wholeheartedly agree with this statement. I think that is the interesting thing about conspiracy theories, rival histories, and even historical denial. They provide us with material to engage our hermeneutic faculties. For me, as a history educator, one of the best things to happen to Australian history was the history wars… suddenly the national past became interesting for students in a way that it wasn’t without this historiographic controversy. It is historiographic controversy, either of the type I have described in this article, or elsewhere in my published articles, that interests me the most as a history educator.

      Yes, I probably overplayed the problem of the attention Brown’s novel gained. If anything, I have always been intrigued that authorities felt compelled to respond to the book and its claims to reveal a hidden history of Christianity (albeit not as a historical novel, as you quite rightly correct). It is not so much that it was incorrect in the hidden history its contemporary characters debate in the novel, but the fact that this became a public issue that I find most intriguing.

Pin It on Pinterest