Between Memory Recall and Historical Consciousness: Implications for Education

Zwischen Erinnerung und Geschichtsbewusstsein: Folgerungen für den Unterricht | Entre la mémoire et la conscience historique: quelques implications pour l’éducation

 

 


“Honestly, I don’t recall anything. But I think there were lots of troubles between French and English Canadians… ” says one 17 year old student when asked to recount the history of Canada. Like many of her counterparts, Annie was initially baffled by the task of writing a historical narrative of Canada because, as she put it, “I don’t recall anything”. Public surveys periodically remind Canadians of the catastrophic state of historical knowledge among youth. “Canada is failing history,” as one newspaper even put it.[1]

Historical consciousness without knowledge?

Yet, Annie knew significantly more than initially thought. Not only was she able to write a simplified narrative of Canadian history, but the orientation of her story reveals important aspects of her historical consciousness. Both memory and historical consciousness have to do with the past. But there are subtle differences between the two. Memory is the residue of life, says Nora, because it is subject to the mental dialectic of “remembering and forgetting, unconscious of its successive deformations”.[2] Historical consciousness, on the other hand, is the mental reconstruction and appropriation of historical information and experiences that are brought into the mental household of an individual. While memory nourishes the recollection of past experiences, historical consciousness involves a complex process of combining the past, the present, and the envisioned future into meaningful and sense-bearing time.[3] It serves the reflexive and practical function of orienting life in time, thus guiding our contemporary actions and moral behaviours in reference to past actualities. It is with the help of historical consciousness that Annie was able to confess her poor memory but soon after recount the history of Canada as “lots of troubles between French and English Canadians”. In this short sentence Annie offers a synthesized vision of Canadian history as defined by the historic tensions between the two founding European nations: the French and the British.

Grand narratives and historical consciousness

In the logic of her story, the development of Canada has not followed distinctive progress toward nation-building as promoted by the Canadian grand narrative. On the contrary, Annie’s vision is less confident and characterized by the duality of the country. Interestingly, recent studies with Canadians reveal a similar pattern.[4] Even if people lament their poor knowledge of history, they can, nonetheless, offer relatively coherent historical narratives which, in the case of French Canadians, frequently highlight their struggles for survival. Such findings expose another crucial aspect of historical consciousness: an awareness of the temporal dimension of the self (personal identity). By means of historical consciousness an individual can expend and complexify his or her personal experience and belong to a larger temporal framework. Telling a story of a national community is not just a mere act of recounting past events, but one that is informed by a certain kind of “cultural knowledge” bearing information significant to both the community and the self. In the case of Annie’s simplified narrative, the reference to “lots of troubles between French and English Canadians” are not banal. It makes it possible to inscribe her narrative vision of Canada into a wider socio-temporal dimension – one shared by many generations of French Canadians.

Skills of historical learning

But what has all this to do with education? At least two central elements of historical consciousness should interest educators: narrative vision and historical thinking.[5] First, the study of historical consciousness makes it possible to understand how people use the past. For Rüsen, the ability to create a narrative vision is not optional to human life. The mental operations by which individuals make sense of the world lie in narration. This is to say that all learners possess some more-or-less coherent historical narratives of their community. These “broad pictures” of the past serve to orient their life so any attempt to educate learners should take into account the prior knowledge that they bring to school. In brief, Annie’s narrative vision of Canadian history informs her views of the world and operates as the backdrop against which all new knowledge will be acquired. This forces us, as educators, to consider some key questions: what stories of the past do students bring to school? What cultural tools to they use to shape their visions of history? In what ways to these tools affect their conceptions of the past, the present, and the future?

Ability to deconstruct and think historically

Second, the development of historical consciousness is not an “all-or-nothing” process. In our studies, we found that learners do not necessarily draw on or create critical historical narratives, even at the university level, but often approach the past opportunistically with pre-existing narrative ideas and misconceptions.[6] I believe that the work of educators is to expend their broad pictures of the past through historical thinking. This disciplinary process of thinking critically about the past offers a scholastic toolkit for making sense of what historical narrative are and how they are constructed and used. For decades, scholars have been conceptualizing ways of thinking historically through meta-historical concepts and heuristics.[7] They have proclaimed that beyond factual knowledge and grand narratives, learners also need a “disciplinary form of knowledge” to evaluate historical claims through such questions as: What group(s) am I part of? Why is this story important to me? Should I believe it? On what ground? What evidence do we have? Perhaps in the past it was sufficient for learners to recall memory information of the community. But in today’s complex, rapidly-changing world, this approach to history is no longer sufficient. We need an educated citizenry capable of orienting themselves in time with critical, usable narrative visions of their world.

____________________

Literature

  • Carr, D. (1986). Time, Narrative, and History. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Rüsen, Jörn. (2005). History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books.
  • Wertsch, J. (2002). Voices of Collective Remembering. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

External links

____________________

[1] M. Chalifoux and J.D.M. Stewart, “Canada is failing history.” The Globe and Mail. (June 16, 2009). Available: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/canada-is-failing-history/article4276621/ (last accessed 22.9.2014).
[2] P. Nora, “Between Memory and History: Les lieux de mémoire,” Représentations, 26 (Spring 1989): 8-9.
[3] J. Rüsen, History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books (2005).
[4] See S. Lévesque, J.P. Croteau, and R. Gani, “La conscience historique de jeunes Franco-Ontariens d’Ottawa: histoire et sentiment d’appartenance,” Historical Studies in Education (forthcoming), 24 p.; J. Létourneau, Si je me souviens? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse. Anjou, QC: Fides (2014); S. Lévesque, J. Létourneau, and R. Gani. “A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11, 2 (2013): R. Gani, “L’histoire nationale dans ses grandes lignes: enquête internationale sur la conscience historique,” Canadian Issues, (Spring 2012): 156‐72; M. Robichaud, “L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick : construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique,” Acadiensis 40, 2 (2011): 33-69 ; and J. Létourneau and S. Moisan, “Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement,” Canadian Historical Review 84, 2 (2004): 325-357.
[5] For an extensive discussion on related challenges for history education, see P. Lee, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow’: Historical consciousness and understanding history, International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 7 (2002): 1-46; and N. Tutiaux-Guillon, “L’histoire enseignée entre coutume disciplinaire et formation de la conscience historique: l’exemple français,” In N. Tutiaux-Guillon and D. Nourisson (Eds.), Identités, mémoires, conscience historique. St-Étienne, FR: Publications de l’Université St-Étienne (2003), 27-39.
[6] See, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow,’ 18.
[7] See for instance, B. VanSledright, The challenge of rethinking history education: On practices, theories, and policy, New York, NY: Routledge (2011); S. Lévesque, Thinking historically: Educating students for the 21st century. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2008); P. Seixas (ed.), Theorizing historical consciousness. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2006); S. Donavan and J. Bransford (eds), How students learn: History in the classroom. Washington, DC: National Academics Press (2005); K. Barton and L. Levstik, Teaching history for the common good. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; an S. Wineburg, Historical thinking and other unnatural acts. Philadelphia: Temple University Press (2001).

____________________
Image Credits
© Wikimedia Commons (public Domain). Battle of the Plains of Abraham (13 September 1759) between English and French troops, during the Seven Years’ War (French and Indian War).
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/PlainsOfAbraham2007.jpg

Recommended Citation
Levesque, Stéphane: Between Memory Recall and Historical Consciousness: Implications for Education. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 33, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2593.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

“Ehrlich gesagt erinnere ich mich an gar nichts. Ich glaube, da gab es eine Menge Schwierigkeiten zwischen den französischen und englischen Kanadiern …” antwortete eine 17-jährige Schülerin auf die Aufforderung, die Geschichte Kanadas zu erzählen. Wie viele ihrer Altersgenossen reagierte sie zunächst verwirrt auf die Aufgabe, eine Darstellung der Geschichte Kanadas zu verfassen. Denn, so äußerte sie sich, “ich erinnere mich an gar nichts”. Erhebungen in der Öffentlichkeit, die eine Unzahl von “entscheidenden” Daten abfragen, erinnern die Kanadier regelmäßig an den katastrophalen Zustand der historischen Kenntnisse bei Jugendlichen. “Kanada versagt in Geschichte”, brachte es eine Zeitung gar auf den Punkt.[1]

Geschichtsbewusstsein ohne historisches Wissen?

Und doch wusste Annie erheblich mehr über Geschichte, als sie ursprünglich dachte. Sie war nicht nur in der Lage, eine einfache Geschichte Kanadas schriftlich anzufertigen, die Orientierung ihrer Erzählung brachte auch wichtige Aspekte ihres Geschichtsbewusstseins zum Vorschein. Sowohl Erinnerung wie Geschichtsbewusstsein handeln von der Vergangenheit, aber dazwischen bestehen subtile Unterschiede. Erinnerung ist das Überbleibsel des Lebens, sagt der französische Historiker Pierre Nora. Sie ist Gegenstand einer mentalen Dialektik von “Erinnern und Vergessen, unbewusst ihrer sukzessiven Deformation”.[2] Geschichtsbewusstsein ist hingegen die mentale Rekonstruktion und Periodisierung von historischer Information und Erfahrung, die sich im mentalen Haushalt eines Individuums abspielt. Während das Gedächtnis die Erinnerung gelebter Erfahrungen nährt, umfasst Geschichtsbewusstsein den komplexen Prozess der Verbindung von Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und der vorgestellten Zukunft zu einem bedeutungsvollen und sinnhaften Zeitverständnis.[3] Des Weiteren dient solches Bewusstsein als reflexive und praktische Funktion der Orientierung in der Zeit, um unsere gegenwärtigen Handlungen und Moralvorstellungen mit den historischen Tatsachen in Einklang zu bringen. Mithilfe ihres Geschichtsbewusstseins war Annie dazu in der Lage, einerseits ihre fehlende Erinnerung an die Geschichte Kanadas einzugestehen und sie zugleich mit der Feststellung von “jeder Menge Schwierigkeiten zwischen französischen und englischen Kanadiern” zu umschreiben. Mit dieser kurzen Sentenz lässt Annie mehr als Erinnerungsfragmente erkennen. Sie bietet eine verkürzte Darstellung der kanadischen Geschichte an, die durch historische Spannungen zwischen den beiden europäischen Gründungsnationen bestimmt wird: den Franzosen und den Briten.

Meistererzählung und Geschichtsbewusstsein

In der Logik ihrer Erzählung folgte die Entwicklung Kanadas nicht zielgerichtet und unverwechselbar einem Prozess der Nationenbildung, wie sie als kanadische Meistererzählung öffentlich vertreten wird. Im Gegenteil ist Annies Version wenig selbstsicher und zeichnet sich aber durch eine starke Betonung der Gespaltenheit des Landes aus. Interessanterweise haben frühere Studien ähnliche Muster der kanadischen Geschichte aufgezeigt.[4] Auch wenn Kanadier immer wieder ihre spärlichen Kenntnisse der Nationalgeschichte betonen, können sie ungeachtet dessen eine relativ kohärente und wirkungsmächtige historische Narration entwickeln. Im Falle der französischen Kanadier wird dabei regelmäßig deren Kampf um kollektive Selbstbehauptung betont. Solche Ergebnisse decken weitere zentrale Aspekte des Geschichtsbewusstseins auf: ein Verstehen der zeitlichen Dimensionen persönlicher Identität und ein Bewusstsein dafür. Mittels des Geschichtsbewusstseins kann ein Individuum seine persönliche Erfahrung (und Identität) einsetzen. Eine Geschichte einer nationalen Gemeinschaft zu erzählen, ist nicht nur ein bloßer Akt der Aufzählung historischer Ereignisse, sondern auch zweifelsfrei eine Art des “kulturellen Wissens”, das wichtige Informationen über die Gemeinschaft und das Selbst in sich trägt. Im Falle von Annies simpler Narration ist der Bezug zu “Schwierigkeiten der französischen und englischen Kanadier” keinesfalls banal. Es wird ihr dadurch möglich, ihre narrative Version der Geschichte Kanadas in eine größere zeitliche und gesellschaftliche Dimension zu verorten – eine, die bereits durch zahlreiche Generationen von französischen Kanadiern geteilt wird.

Werkzeuge des geschichtsbezogenen Lernens

Aber was hat dies mit historischem Lernen zu tun? Mindestens zwei zentrale Elemente des Geschichtsbewusstseins sollten Lehrende interessieren – seien dies SchullehrerInnen oder UniversitätsprofessorInnen: narrative Vorstellung und historisches Denken.[5] Zunächst macht es die Erforschung des Geschichtsbewusstseins möglich zu verstehen, wie die Vergangenheit genutzt wird. Für Rüsen ist die Fähigkeit, eine Narration zu entwerfen, zwingend erforderlich für die menschliche Existenz. Das Selbstverständnis des Menschen und die Bedeutung, die er der Welt gibt, enthält immer historische Bezüge. Auch die Vorgehensweise, mit der Individuen aus ihnen Sinn herstellen, besteht aus Narration. Das bedeutet, dass alle Lernenden über mehr oder weniger kohärente Narrationen ihrer kulturellen Gemeinschaft verfügen. Diese “grobe Vorstellung” über die Vergangenheit hilft ihnen bei der Orientierung im Leben und bei ihren Handlungen; daher sollte jeder Versuch, die Jugendlichen zu unterrichten, ihr in die Schule mitgebrachtes historisches Wissen und ihre Vorstellungen von Vergangenheit beachten. Kurz gesagt prägt Annies Vorstellung der kanadischen Geschichte mit den “Schwierigkeiten zwischen englischen und französischen Kanadiern” ihre Weltsicht und stellt den Hintergrund dar, vor dem alles neu erworbene Wissen sich einfügen muss. Dies stellt uns als Lehrende vor einige Schlüsselfragen: Welche Geschichten der Vergangenheit bringen SchülerInnen mit in die Schule? Welche kulturellen Werkzeuge nutzen sie, um ihre Versionen der Vergangenheit zu gestalten? Auf welche Weise nutzen sie diese Werkzeuge, um ihre Konzepte der Vergangenheit in die Gegenwart und die Zukunft zu übertragen?

Fähigkeit zur Dekonstruktion

Zweitens ist die Entwicklung des Geschichtsbewusstseins kein “Alles-oder-Nichts”-Lernprozess. In verschiedenen Studien, einschließlich unseren eigenen, fanden wir heraus, dass Lernende –  selbst auf universitärem Lernniveau – nicht notwendigerweise kritische historische Narrative entwerfen, sondern sich der Vergangenheit oft opportunistisch mit existierenden Narrativen und (Fehl-)Konzepten annähern.[6] Ich glaube, es ist die Aufgabe der Lehrenden, die in diesem Sinne existierenden weiten Vorstellungen von der Vergangenheit aufzulösen und ein historisches Denken zu etablieren. Dieser disziplinäre Prozess des kritischen Denkens eröffnet ihnen eine akademische Herangehensweise, die Einsichten darin ermöglicht, was historische Narrative sind und auch wie diese konstruiert und benutzt werden. Für Jahrzehnte haben WissenschaftlerInnen in Europa und Nordamerika Konzepte entworfen, wie man durch meta-geschichtliche Konzepte und Heuristik historisch denkt.[7] Sie haben die These aufgestellt, dass die Lernenden jenseits von faktischem Wissen und Meistererzählungen auch eine “disziplinäre Form des Wissens” benötigen. Dies verhelfe ihnen dazu, historische Behauptungen durch Fragen zu überprüfen: Welche Identität habe ich? Welchen Gruppen bin ich zugehörig? Warum ist diese Geschichte für mich wichtig? Soll ich das glauben? Aus welchem Grund? Haben sich die Verhältnisse in Kanada (oder sonst wo) verbessert? Auf welche Weise? Welche Belege gibt es dafür?

Vielleicht reichte es in der Vergangenheit aus, wenn Lernende sich bei Bedarf ihre kulturell relevanten Gedächtnisinformationen zu vergegenwärtigen mochten. In der heutigen komplexen Gegenwart einer sich rapide verändernden Welt reicht dieser Zugang zu Geschichte nicht mehr länger aus. Wir benötigen eine historisch gebildete Bürgerschaft, die in der Lage ist, sich in der Zeit zu orientieren mit kritischen und brauchbaren historischen Narrativen über die Welt, in der sie leben.

____________________

Literatur

  • Carr, David: Time, Narrative, and History. Bloomington 1986.
  • Rüsen, Jörn: History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York 2005.
  • Wertsch, James: Voices of Collective Remembering. New York 2002.

Externe Links

____________________

[1] Chalifoux, Marc / Stewart, J.D.M.: “Canada is failing history.” In: The Globe and Mail. (Ausg. v. 16.6. 2009). http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/canada-is-failing-history/article4276621/ (letzter Zugriff 22.9.2014).
[2] Nora, Pierre: Between Memory and History: Les lieux de mémoire. In: Représentations 26 (Spring 1989): S. 8-9.
[3] Rüsen, Jörn: History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York 2005.
[4] Vgl. Lévesque, Stéphane / Croteau, Jean Philipe / Gani, Raphaël: La conscience historique de jeunes Franco-Ontariens d’Ottawa: histoire et sentiment d’appartenance, Historical Studies in Education (forthcoming), 24 p.; Létourneau, Jocelyn: Si je me souviens? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse. Anjou, QC: Fides 2014; Lévesque, Stéphane / Létourneau, Jocelyn / Gani, Raphaël: A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation. In: International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11 (2013) 2; Gani, Raphaël: L’histoire nationale dans ses grandes lignes: enquête internationale sur la conscience historique. In: Canadian Issues (Spring 2012), S. 156‐72; Robichaud, Marc: L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick: construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique. In: Acadiensis 40 (2011) 2, S. 33-69; and Létourneau, Jocelyn / Moisan, Sabrina: Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement. In: Canadian Historical Review 84 (2004) 2, S. 325-357.
[5] Als Beispiel für eine ausführliche Diskussion über die damit verbundenen Herausforderungen für den Geschichtsunterricht vgl. Lee, Peter: ‘Walking backwards into tomorrow’: Historical consciousness and understanding history. In: International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 7 (2002), S. 1-46; und Tutiaux-Guillon, Nicole: L’histoire enseignée entre coutume disciplinaire et formation de la conscience historique: l’exemple français. In Ders. / Nourisson, Didier (Hrsg.): Identités, mémoires, conscience historique. St-Étienne, FR 2003, S. 27-39.
[6] Vgl. Lee 2002, S. 18.
[7] Vgl. Z.B. VanSledright, Bruce: The challenge of rethinking history education: On practices, theories, and policy, New York 2011; Lévesque, Stéphane: Thinking historically: Educating students for the 21st century. Toronto 2008; Seixas, Peter: (Hrsg.): Theorizing historical consciousness. Toronto 2006; Donavan Suzanne / Bransford, John (Hrsg.): How students learn: History in the classroom. Washington, DC 2005; Barton Keith / Levstik, Linda: Teaching history for the common good. Mahwah, 2004; und Wineburg, Samuel: Historical thinking and other unnatural acts. Philadelphia 2001.

____________________
Abbildungsnachweis
© Wikimedia Commons (gemeinfrei). Schlacht auf der Abraham-Ebene (13.9.1759) zwischen Engländern und Franzosen, während des Siebenjährigen Krieges (Franzosen- und Indianerkrieg).
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/PlainsOfAbraham2007.jpg

Übersetzung aus dem Englischen
von Marco Zerwas

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Levesque, Stéphane: Zwischen Erinnerung und Geschichtsbewusstsein: Folgerungen für den Unterricht. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 33, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2593.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

“Honnêtement, je ne me rappelle de rien. Mais je pense qu’il y avait beaucoup de troubles avec les Français canadien et les Anglais canadien….” Voilà la première réaction d’une élève de 17 ans à qui l’on a demandé de raconter l’histoire du Canada. Comme plusieurs de ses pairs, Annie fut d’abord surprise par la tâche de rédiger un court récit de l’aventure historique du Canada car, comme elle l’affirme, “je ne me rappelle de rien“. Plusieurs sondages d’opinion rappellent périodiquement aux Canadiens le manque inquiétant de connaissances historiques chez les jeunes. La situation est telle qu’un quotidien national a même affirmé que c’est “tout le Canada qui échoue son cours d’histoire“.[1]

La conscience historique sans la connaissance?

Sans nier la situation actuelle, les propos de notre élève, Annie, révèlent davantage que sa simple ignorance de l’histoire. Non seulement a t-elle été en mesure de nous fournir un bref récit de sa société mais l’orientation et la vision de son récit en disent long sur ce qu’est la conscience historique. Mémoire et conscience historique sont tous deux en relation avec le passé. Mais il existe d’importantes différences entre les deux. La mémoire, comme le rappelle Pierre Nora, c’est le résidu de la vie ouverte à la dialectique du souvenir et de l’amnésie, inconsciente de ses déformations successives…“[2]. La conscience historique, quant à elle, est la reconstruction mentale de ce qui n’est plus à partir d’expériences et d’informations historiques qui sont portées à un niveau second d’intellection et d’appropriation. Alors que la mémoire nourrit les souvenirs de ce qu’un individu a vécu ou de ce qui lui a été transmis, la conscience historique met en relation le passé, le présent et l’avenir possible[3]. Elle appelle la pensée réflexive et la conscience temporelle. Elle vise une actualisation du passé dans nos vies permettant à tout individu de juger, de choisir et d’agir. C’est en faisant appel à sa conscience historique qu’Annie a pu déclarer ne plus se souvenir de rien mais tout de même offrir un bref récit qui raconte beaucoup de troubles avec les français canadien et les anglais canadien. Dans cette formule, Annie présente davantage que des faits bruts issus de la mémoire. Elle offre un condensé métahistorique qui est de l’ordre de la signification, de ce que représente l’histoire canadienne telle que définie par la tension historique entre les deux peuples fondateurs: les Français et les Anglais.

Méta-récit et conscience historique

Selon cette logique, le développement du pays n’a pas suivi le cheminement progressif du grand récit canadien caractérisé par une vision nationale du nation-building. Au contraire, son texte exprime une vision particulière de l’aventure historique canadienne qui trouve comme point d’origine la dualité même du pays. Fait intéressant, de récentes études révèlent une tendance similaire au pays[4]. Bien que les Canadiens avouent volontiers leur ignorance du passé, ils sont tout à fait aptes à mettre en récit le passé de leur société; récits qui chez plusieurs Canadiens français mettent en lumière la prévalence des luttes du groupe pour la survie. Ces études dévoilent également une autre dimension de la conscience historique: elle permet à tout individu de se penser dans le temps et ainsi de nourrir son identité, de prendre conscience de son appartenance à un groupe qui a une histoire, une vision temporelle. En ce sens, mettre en récit le passé de sa société ne se réduit pas à énoncer une série de faits issus de la mémoire mais plutôt à présenter une vision du passé collectif  qui a un sens pour soi. Dans le cas de notre élève, l’idée selon laquelle il y avait beaucoup de troubles avec les français canadien et les anglais canadien n’est pas insignifiante. Elle permet l’appropriation d’une certaine vision narrative du Canada qui s’inscrit dans un espace temporel et sociétal bien défini, celui du Canada français.

L’apprentissage historique

Quel lien ont tous ces propos avec l’éducation historique? La conscience historique permet une réflexion qui devrait intéresser les éducateurs d’écoles et d’universités pour au moins deux raisons: l’orientation narrative et la pensée historique[5]. D’abord, la conscience historique permet de mieux comprendre comment les individus, incluant les jeunes, font usage du passé dans leurs pratiques réelles. Pour Rüsen, la narrativité n’est pas facultative à la vie humaine. Le besoin de comprendre et donner sens au monde qui nous entoure et celui qui nous précède implique une démarche par laquelle l’individu transforme le passé et rend son actualisation possible par l’histoire: le récit. C’est donc dire que tout apprenant possède certaines visions historiques ou certains schémas narratifs lui permettant de s’orienter dans le temps. Pour notre élève, Annie, les nombreux troubles avec les français canadien et les anglais canadien expriment une intellection particulière du passé et ce faisant, participent ou influencent ses nouveaux apprentissages de l’histoire. Comme pédagogues, ce constat nous amène à poser certaines questions : Quels récits de l’aventure historique de leur société les jeunes apportent-ils dans leur bagage cognitif? Quels outils culturels (cultural tools) utilisent-ils pour façonner leur vision du passé? Dans quelle mesure ces outils affectent-ils leurs conceptions du passé, du présent et de l’avenir possible?

Développer la pensée historique

Ensuite, le développement de la conscience historique ne s’effectue pas en mode binaire du tout ou rien. Nous avons découvert dans nos études que les apprenants, même au niveau universitaire, ne produisent pas forcément des récits critiques et conçoivent souvent le passé collectif à partir de topiques historiales et de (pré)conceptions des prêts-à-penser de la mémoire.[6] J’estime que l’une des missions de l’éducation historique est précisément de problématiser la mise en récit du passé et d’offrir à nos jeunes les outils de la pensée historique dont ils ont besoin pour leur permettre de créer de meilleurs récits historiques qu’ils pourront utiliser pour s’orienter et faire face aux défis d’un monde complexe, diversifié, et de plus en plus global et multiculturel[7]. Dans un passé pas si lointain il était peut-être convenable, et même souhaitable, pour les jeunes de mémoriser une certaine mémoire collective mais dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, cette conception de l’histoire scolaire est largement insuffisante pour former nos citoyens de demain.

____________________

Literature

  • Carr, D. (1986). Time, Narrative, and History. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Rüsen, Jörn. (2005). History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books.
  • Wertsch, J. (2002). Voices of Collective Remembering. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Liens externe

____________________

[1] Chalifoux and J.D.M. Stewart, “Canada is failing history.” The Globe and Mail. (16 Juin, 2009). Disponible: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/canada-is-failing-history/article4276621/ (dernier accès le 22 Septembre 2014).
[
2] P. Nora, “Between Memory and History: Les lieux de mémoire,” Représentations, 26 (Printemps 1989): 8-9.
[3] J. Rüsen, History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books (2005).
[4] Voir S. Lévesque, J.P. Croteau, and R. Gani, “La conscience historique de jeunes Franco-Ontariens d’Ottawa: histoire et sentiment d’appartenance,” Historical Studies in Education (forthcoming), 24 p.; J. Létourneau, Si je me souviens? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse. Anjou, QC: Fides (2014); S. Lévesque, J. Létourneau, and R. Gani. “A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11, 2 (2013): R. Gani, “L’histoire nationale dans ses grandes lignes: enquête internationale sur la conscience historique,” Canadian Issues, (Spring 2012): 156‐72; M. Robichaud, “L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick : construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique,” Acadiensis 40, 2 (2011): 33-69 ; and J. Létourneau and S. Moisan, “Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement,” Canadian Historical Review 84, 2 (2004): 325-357
[5] Pour une analyse plus détaillée des implications pour l’éducation, voir P. Lee, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow’: Historical consciousness and understanding history, International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 7 (2002): 1-46; et N. Tutiaux-Guillon, “L’histoire enseignée entre coutume disciplinaire et formation de la conscience historique: l’exemple français,” In N. Tutiaux-Guillon and D. Nourisson (Eds.), Identités, mémoires, conscience historique. St-Étienne, FR: Publications de l’Université St-Étienne (2003).
[6] Lee, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow,’ 18.
[7] Voir notamment B. VanSledright, The challenge of rethinking history education: On practices, theories, and policy, New York, NY: Routledge (2011); S. Lévesque, Thinking historically: Educating students for the 21st century. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2008); P. Seixas (ed.), Theorizing historical consciousness. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2006); S. Donavan and J. Bransford (eds), How students learn: History in the classroom. Washington, DC: National Academics Press (2005); K. Barton and L. Levstik, Teaching history for the common good. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; et S. Wineburg, Historical thinking and other unnatural acts. Philadelphia: Temple University Press (2001).

____________________

Crédits illustration
© Wikimedia Commons (domaine public). Bataille des plaines d’Abraham (le 13 septembre 1759) entre l’armee britannique et les Français, durant la guerre de Sept Ans.
 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Volgograd_city_sign.jpg

Citation recommandée
Levesque, Stéphane: Entre la mémoire et la conscience historique: quelques implications pour l’éducation. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 33, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2593.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 2 (2014) 33
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2593

Tags: , , , ,

Pin It on Pinterest