History Culture, Identity, and the Post-Colonial Martial Arts

Geschichte, Kultur, Identität und die postkolonialen Kampfsportarten

Abstract:
Martial arts are a complex, multi-dimensional practice, located in diverse socio-historical contexts, and irreducible to singular categories such as combat sport. Focusing on Capoeira and Eskrima, post-colonial martial arts that developed under Portuguese and Spanish colonial rule respectively, this paper offers selective insights into the landscapes of each art in which history is both remembered and forgotten, and respect is identified for both ancestral inheritance and innovation.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17815.
Languages: English, German


In the history culture of martial arts, especially in post-colonial societies, myth-making, tied to national identity formation, creates a veil on the past. It is common to hear that Capoeira and Eskrima, martial arts that developed under Portuguese and Spanish colonial rule respectively, both survived their colonial regimes by being hidden in dance. Yet there is no Capoeira without ‘ginga’ (sway) and there is evidence for Eskrima being an adaptation of Spanish swordsmanship taught to Christianised Filipinos by Jesuit ‘warrior’ Priests to repulse a perceived Muslim pirate threat from the South.[1] In the search for identity, and history, language becomes a surprising ally.

The Iberian Connection

Martial Arts are a multi-dimensional practice, constituted by the varied classes of phenomena (eg. technical emphasis, tactics, material weaponry, teaching methodology, philosophy, social hierarchy etc.) that construct the very existence of a given martial art style.[2] Such styles are inevitably culturally-historically located, emerging from complex socio-political contexts. The forms of martial art thus differ, sometimes dramatically, and are irreducible to simple definitions such as self-defence methods, or combat sports; and categories such as ‘modern’ and ‘traditional’ collapse under close scrutiny.[3] Despite this, Bowman has argued

that “Martial arts as a cluster of familiar ideas, motifs, images, and as a category has certainly achieved stabilization in contemporary discourses, even if it lacks both precision and a stable referent” (p. 58).[4]

Cautiously then, I will provide a brief introduction to aspects of the history culture of two particular arts, Capoeira (the Afro-Brazilian “dance-fighting” art), and Eskrima or Arnis de Mano (the Filipino national “stick-fighting” sport). In terms of appearance these arts would seem to have little in common. However, what may not be immediately obvious, is that both register traces of an historical connection with the Iberian world (as prior colonies of Portugal and Spain respectively), and offer particular insights into the post-colonial landscapes of their respective martial art traditions, in which history is both remembered and forgotten, and there exists within tradition a respect for inheritance and innovation.

Who Taught You the Beauty of Dancing in the Fight?

Capoeira is frequently described as an Afro-Brazilian martial art. The term Capoeiristas use to describe the art themselves is jogo (a game). The Jogo de Capoeira (game of Capoeira) in its contemporary form, is played to the pulsating rhythms of a berimbau (musical bow), atabaque (conga-like drum), and pandeiro (a type of tambourine). Originally developed by African slaves living in Brazil’s Senzalas (slaves houses) in the 1700s and 1800s, Capoeira has roots in West African courtship and war dances; and influenced the peacock-like break-dancing culture of the late 1970s.[5] When the berimbau calls, Capoeiristas stand shoulder to shoulder forming a roda (circle) within which the players enter to play the game. Those forming the circle keep cadence with their clapping. During the jogo each player attempts to use their malendragem (trickery) and malicia (cunning) to read and out-wit the other in a physical game of chess, in which only the hands, feet, and head are typically permitted to touch the floor. Games are a complex dialogue of powerful kicks and daring evasions, artful acrobatics and playful theatrics.

Adding further complexity to the jogo, Capoeira players must be responsive to changes in the rhythm being played on the berimbau, and listen carefully to the songs, sung in Portuguese (originally the language of the coloniser), being led by the Mestre (Master), that encourage certain actions in the game (such as the execution of a takedown), or make commentary, often humorously, on what is happening in the game (such as the suggestion that players are getting too close, or a game too heated, and that the combatants might need to find a bungalow, the historical equivalent of ‘find a room’). These ideas are often encoded in metaphor, and are missed by outsiders. Understanding develops among the young Capoeirista over time, as they become more familiar with the game and its rituals. The songs also carry the historical and cultural memory of oppression and the struggle for freedom, forming an important pedagogical tool in the shaping of a Capoeirista’s outlook and identity.[6]

Originally a game played by slaves on Sundays, Capoeira was sometimes known as vadiaçao (a word that directly translates as vagrancy or loitering, but is reinscribed within the art as something like ‘just messing around’). This concept is deeply embedded in the game, making it desirable to find the most beautiful, deceptive, and effortless route to the out-witting of your camarada (comrade), the correct reference for your opponent in the game, perhaps used in contrast to what would have been your real opponent or oppressor, the slave owner. Direct attack is rare, and is read as less skillful, unless executed with unexpected and unrivalled speed and precision. If you are to survive in this world, it should look like your oppressor walked into your leg, and not that you deliberately kicked them. In this regard, the defining characteristic of a Capoeira Mestre is mandinga, a word that implies ‘magical power’ and is exhibited through “bodily acts of deception and trickery.”[7] The mandigueiro (a term that would have once been translated as ‘witch doctor’ and means something like magician or wise-one), moves with Matrix-like power and insight, being able to deceive an adversary without ever “being caught open or exposed.”[8] It is the embodiment of maldade (wickedness), a capacity to be treacherous, and yet to appear the opposite. From the outside, the master’s mandinga may give their moves the appearance of luck, or a capacity to bend reality to one’s advantage, without exuding any obvious effort. Mandinga is learnt, rather than taught,[9] and represents the highest expression of the game, and a key marker of a skillful Capoeirista’s identity. Despite the Mestre’s possession of mandinga, there is a Capoeira song that celebrates that Capoeira’s ends are unknown, even to the wisest of masters, suggesting a respect for the expected and continued evolution of the art.

Within the landscape of Capoeira, the figure of the Mestre looms large in another way too, intimately connected with the idea of history, lineage, and respect for ancestral knowledge. There is a song lyric that translates “Boy, who formed you? Who taught you the beauty, of dancing within the fight?”[10] Here there is clear importance placed on knowing your roots, and giving thanks to those who have passed on this precious knowledge to you. This is not so much lineage as legitimation, as may be important in many East Asian martial arts, but hovers as a challenge to maintain a deep connection with, and sincere acknowledgement of, where your embodied knowledge has come from. Within the Capoeira community, your identity as a jogador (player) is forever tied to those from whom you have inherited your ability to dance in the fight. There is no (respectful) place for forgetting this.

Warriors, Priests, and Pirates

The Filipino martial art of Eskrima (the local pronunciation of the Spanish word for ‘fencing’) is a practical form of combat with baston (sticks) and bolo (what might be called ‘working blades’ or cutlass-style machete), most likely arising from a unique synergy of elements from a lingering Sino-Malay martial arts cultural background, and an ingenious Filipino re-engineering of the geometric logic of Spanish swordsmanship for local weapons.[11] The early evolution of the art remains uncertain. What we can say with some confidence is that the process of development of the many forms of Eskrima[12] occurred over three hundred years of colonisation in which Jesuit priests taught swordsmanship to local warriors;[13] was refined through revolution and rebellion during struggles for independence; formalised in the pre-WWII period through the formation of sporting clubs; and finally, officially recognised in 2009 as the country’s national sport.

Among ex-pat Filipinos living in the United States during the Civil Rights era, it became popular to refer to the art as Kali, from an old Tagalog word (meaning “skill with blades”), as a kind of resistance to use of the Spanish loan-word Eskrima (which accurately implied the practitioner’s ability to wield a stick with the skill of a swordsman, but carried strong connotations of a colonial inheritance). Like Capoeira, language carries historical traces in this post-colonial martial art tradition, and while Kali practitioners may have desired to locate a pre-Hispanic origin for their art, they appear to have had little difficulty using Spanish terminology for many of their drills and sub-systems, Engganyo (feinting or deception), Numerado (by the numbers), Sombrada (a cover and counter drill), Espada y Daga (sword and dagger), Abierta and Serrada (open and closed guard positions), among much of the art’s lingua franca, despite one source claiming that during the colonial period the number of Filipinos who could speak Spanish apparently never exceeded 2.8% of the population.[14] Of course, this suggests a strong Spanish influence, still registered in contemporary forms of the art, as does the art’s official name, Arnis de Mano (literally ‘armour of the hand’), which most likely refers to the fact that the Eskrimador’s only armour during the Juego Todo (no holds barred) stick-fighting duels that continued into the early 20th Century, was the stick in their hand.[15] Another, frequent refrain, links the term Arnis to the costumes of actors in Moro Moro plays in which the Christianised Visayan warriors, wearing Arnes (armour), successfully repulse the Muslim ‘pirates’ from Mindinao.[16] Such plays reconstruct and repeat an historical conflict which continues to have resonances today.[17]

History gives way to myth rapidly within the Filipino martial tradition, as some Eskrimadors embellish stories of the past in order to claim prestige in the present.[18] It is common practice to rename the art in each successive generation, making genealogies complex, but providing legitimacy for innovation as a core aspect of tradition. Once taught mostly in families or villages, many Eskrima styles are treated like precious heirlooms, only to be shared with a trusted few, making their preservation an object of contemporary concern.

Our Post-colonial Landscapes

Researching the history of martial arts emergent from post-colonial communities presents unique problems beyond the separation of fact from opinion, or the establishment of a plausible account. Complex sensibilities must be navigated. As an Anglo-Celtic student of these arts, I remain mindful that I am a guest in these lands. Within such post-colonial (not to mention ‘globalised’) martial arts landscapes, historical origins may be uncertain, but methods have been passed down through the generations, without the disruption seen in Europe, where there is a return to Medieval and Renaissance manuals to rehabilitate lost Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) traditions. Exploring martial history culture in the colonies presents an interesting point of reference for this work, given the visible legacies of these encounters between the metropol and the periphery; and martial traditions offer surprising insights into cultural values, identities, and histories.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Paul Bowman, Deconstructing Martial Arts (Cardiff: Cardiff University Press, 2019). Free, open access version available online: https://doi.org/10.18573/book1
  • Mark V. Wiley, Filipino Martial Culture (Tokyo: Tuttle, 1996).
  • Greg Downey, Learning Capoeira: Lessons in cunning from an Afro-Brazilian art (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2005).

Web Resources

  • Axé Capoeira Brazilian Martial Arts Documentary Vancouver 2009. Available online: https://youtu.be/c6WnkJGcwbw (last accessed 29 March 2021).
  • Fighting Sticks of Arnis Trailer (Empty Mind Films). Available Online: https://youtu.be/UjtD4vN0EfM (last accessed 29 March 2021).
  • “Learning in Capoeira’s roda: The ritual space of the Afro-Brazilian martial art,” Paper presented by Robert Parkes in the “Na volta que mundo deu, Na volta que mundo da: Ritualised initiations and personal transformations in Capoeira, the Afro-Brazilian martial art” Symposium at the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia Conference, Newcastle, 2nd December 2017. Video available online: https://youtu.be/vabNSdrNABU (last accessed 29 March 2021).

_____________________
[1] Ned R. Nepangue and Celestino C. Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima: Beyond the Myth (USA: Xlibris Corporation, 2007).
[2] Sixt Wetzler, “Martial Arts Studies as Kulturwissenschaft,” Martial Arts Studies 1 (2015), 20-33.
[3] Paul Bowman, “The Tradition of Invention: On Authenticity in Traditional Asian Martial Arts,” in East Asian Pedagogies: Education as Formation and Transformation Across Cultures and Borders, ed. David Lewin and Karsten Kenklies (Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature Switzerland, 2020), 205-225.
[4] Paul Bowman, Deconstructing Martial Arts (Cardiff: Cardiff University Press, 2019), 58.
[5] “Breaking and Capoeira,” accessed 10 March 2021,  https://www.breakingandcapoeira.com/2019/02/the-influence-of-capoeira-on-breaking.html (last accessed 29 March 2021).
[6] Greg Downey, Learning Capoeira: Lessons in Cunning from an Afro-Brazilian Art (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2005), 74-86; and Matthias Röhrig Assunção, “Chapter 9: History and Memory in Capoeira Lyrics from Bahia, Brazil,” in Cultures of the Lusophone Black Atlantic, eds. Nancy Priscilla Naro, Roger Sansi-Roca, and David H. Treece (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), 199-217.
[7] Sergio González Varela, “Mandinga: Power and Deception in Afro-Brazilian Capoeira,” Social Analysis 57, no. 2 (2013): p.7.
[8] Varela, “Mandinga,” p. 8
[9] Varela, “Mandinga,” p. 8
[10] Ronaldo Santos quoted in Nestor Capoeira, Nestor, Capoeira: Roots of the Dance-Fight-Game (Berkley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2002), 19.
[11] Nepangue and Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima.
[12]  Over 70 technically distinct forms of Filipino Martial Art have been documented in the Philippines today. See Mark Wiley, Filipino Martial Culture (Tokyo: Tuttle, 1996), 23.
[13] Nepangue and Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima, 67-78.
[14] Nepangue and Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima, 56-57.
[15] Rey Carlo T. Gonzales, “Filipino Martial Arts and the Construction of Filipino National Identity” (PhD diss., University of Manchester, 2015), 49.
[16] Felipe P. Joxano Jr.,  Arnis: A Question of Origins, Rapid Journal 2, no.
4 (1997): 15- 17.
[17] Ruel A. Macaraeg, “Pirates of the Philippines: A Critical Thinking Exercise,” in Filipino Martial Art Anthology, ed. Michael A. DeMarco (Santa Fe, NM: Via Media Publishing Company, 2017), 94-106.
[18] Gonzales, “Filipino Martial Arts”.

_____________________

Image Credits

The author with his Maestro Paolo Pagaling in Metro Manila in 2019 © all rights reserved by Robert J. Parkes.

Recommended Citation

Parkes, Robert J.: History Culture, Identity, and the Post-Colonial Martial Arts. In: Public History Weekly 9 (2021) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17815.

Editorial Responsibility

Marko Demantowsky

In der Geschichtskultur der Kampfkünste, besonders in postkolonialen Gesellschaften, legt die Mythenbildung, die mit der nationalen Identitätsbildung verbunden ist, einen Schleier über die Vergangenheit. Häufig wird behauptet, dass Capoeira und Eskrima, zwei Kampfkünste, die sich unter portugiesischer bzw. spanischer Kolonialherrschaft entwickelten, ihre jeweiligen Kolonialregime überlebten, indem sie im Tanz versteckt wurden. Doch es gibt kein Capoeira ohne “ginga” (Schwung). Belegt ist ebenso, dass Eskrima eine Adaption der spanischen Schwertkunst ist, die den christianisierten Filipinos von jesuitischen “Krieger”-Priestern beigebracht wurde, um eine vermeintliche Bedrohung durch muslimische Piraten aus dem Süden abzuwehren.[1]  Auf der Suche nach Identität und Geschichte wird die Sprache zu einem überraschenden Verbündeten.

Die iberische Verbindung

Kampfkünste sind eine mehrdimensionale Praxis, die sich aus verschiedenen Phänomenen zusammensetzt (z.B. technischer Schwerpunkt, Taktik, materielle Bewaffnung, Lehrmethodik, Philosophie, soziale Hierarchie usw.), die die Existenz eines bestimmten Kampfkunststils ausmachen.[2] Solche Stile sind zwangsläufig kulturell-historisch verortet und entstehen aus komplexen sozio-politischen Kontexten. Die Formen der Kampfkunst unterscheiden sich daher, manchmal dramatisch, und sind nicht auf einfache Definitionen wie Selbstverteidigungsmethoden oder Kampfsportarten reduzierbar; ebenso erweisen sich Kategorien wie “modern” und “traditionell” bei genauer Betrachtung nicht als funktional.[3] Dennoch hat Bowman argumentiert,

dass “Kampfkunst als ein Cluster von vertrauten Ideen, Motiven, Bildern und als Kategorie sicherlich eine Stabilisierung in den zeitgenössischen Diskursen erreicht hat, auch wenn es ihr sowohl an Präzision als auch an einem stabilen Referenten fehlt”.[4]

Mit gewisser Vorsicht werde ich daher eine kurze Einführung in kulturhistorische Aspekte von zwei besonderen Künsten geben, Capoeira (die afro-brasilianische “Tanz-Kampf”-Kunst) und Eskrima oder Arnis de Mano (der philippinische “Stockkampf”). Zunächst einmal scheinen diese Künste wenig gemeinsam zu haben. Was jedoch vielleicht nicht sofort augenscheinlich ist: Beide weisen Spuren einer historischen Verbindung mit der iberischen Welt (als frühere Kolonien Portugals bzw. Spaniens) auf und ermöglichen besondere Einblicke in die postkolonialen Landschaften ihrer jeweiligen Kampfkunsttraditionen, in denen Geschichte sowohl erinnert als auch vergessen wird und innerhalb der Tradition sowohl Erbe als auch Innovation respektiert werden.

Wer hat dir die Schönheit des Tanzens im Kampf beigebracht?

Capoeira wird häufig als afro-brasilianische Kampfkunst beschrieben. Der Begriff, mit dem Capoeiristas die Kunst selbst beschreiben, ist Jogo (ein Spiel). Das Jogo de Capoeira (Spiel der Capoeira) in seiner heutigen Form wird zu den pulsierenden Rhythmen eines Berimbau (Musikbogen), Atabaque (Conga-ähnliche Trommel) und Pandeiro (eine Art Tamburin) gespielt. Ursprünglich von afrikanischen Sklav:innen entwickelt, die in den 1700er und 1800er Jahren in Brasiliens Senzalas (Sklavenhäusern) lebten, hat Capoeira seine Wurzeln in westafrikanischen Balz- und Kriegstänzen und beeinflusste die pfauenartige Breakdance-Kultur der späten 1970er Jahre. [5] Ruft der Berimbau, stehen die Capoeiristas Schulter an Schulter und bilden eine Roda (Kreis), in den die Spieler:innen eintreten, um das Spiel zu spielen. Diejenigen, die den Kreis bilden, halten klatschend die Kadenz aufrecht. Während des Jogo versuchen die Spieler:innen, ihre malendragem (List) und malicia (Gerissenheit) zu nutzen, um das Gegenüber in einem physischen Schachspiel zu lesen und zu überlisten, in dem normalerweise nur die Hände, Füße und der Kopf den Boden berühren dürfen. Die Spiele sind ein komplexer Dialog aus kraftvollen Tritten und gewagten Ausweichmanövern, kunstvoller Akrobatik und spielerischer Theatralik.

Um die Komplexität des Jogo noch zu steigern, müssen Capoeira-Spieler:innen auf Veränderungen im Rhythmus reagieren, der auf dem Berimbau gespielt wird, und aufmerksam auf die Lieder hören, die auf Portugiesisch (ursprünglich die Sprache der Kolonialherren) gesungen und vom Mestre (Meister) angeführt werden, der bestimmte Handlungen im Spiel ermutigt (wie z.B. die Ausführung eines Takedowns) oder, oft auf humorvolle Weise, das Spielgeschehen kommentiert (wie z.B. die Andeutung, dass die Spieler:innen sich zu nahe kommen oder ein Spiel zu hitzig wird und dass die Kämpfer vielleicht einen Bungalow finden müssen, das historische Äquivalent von “ein Zimmer finden”. Diese Überlegungen sind oft in Metaphern verschlüsselt und werden von Aussenstehenden übersehen. Das Verständnis entwickelt sich bei den jungen Capoeirista mit der Zeit, wenn sie mit dem Spiel und seinen Ritualen vertrauter werden. Die Lieder tragen auch das historische und kulturelle Gedächtnis der Unterdrückung und des Freiheitskampfes in sich und bilden so ein wichtiges pädagogisches Werkzeug bei der Ausbildung der Weltanschauung und Identität eines Capoeirista. [6]

Ursprünglich ein Spiel, das von Sklaven an Sonntagen gespielt wurde, war Capoeira manchmal als vadiaçao bekannt (ein Wort, das direkt mit Landstreicherei oder Herumlungern übersetzt wird, aber innerhalb der Kunst als so etwas wie “nur herumalbern” umgeschrieben wird). Dieses Konzept ist tief in das Spiel eingebettet und macht es erstrebenswert, den schönsten, trügerischsten und mühelosesten Weg zu finden, um seinen camarada (Kamerad) zu überlisten, die korrekte Bezeichnung für den Gegner im Spiel, vielleicht verwendet im Gegensatz zu dem, was der eigentliche Gegner oder Unterdrücker gewesen wäre, der Sklavenhalter. Direkte Angriffe sind selten und werden als weniger geschickt interpretiert, es sei denn, sie werden mit unerwarteter und unübertroffener Geschwindigkeit und Präzision ausgeführt. Willst du in dieser Welt überleben, sollte es so aussehen, als sei dir dein Unterdrücker ins Bein gelaufen, und nicht, dass du ihn absichtlich getreten hast. In dieser Hinsicht ist das definierende Merkmal eines Capoeira Mestre mandinga, welches “magische Kraft” impliziert und durch “körperliche Handlungen der Täuschung und List” zur Schau gestellt wird. [7]

Der Mandigueiro (einst mit “Hexendoktor” übersetzt und so etwas wie Magier oder Weiser bedeutend), bewegt sich mit Matrix-ähnlicher Kraft und Einsicht. Er besitzt die Gabe, einen Gegner zu täuschen, ohne jemals “ertappt oder bloßgestellt zu werden”. [8] Dies verkörpert die sogenannte maldade (Bosheit), die Fähigkeit, heimtückisch zu sein und doch als das Gegenteil zu erscheinen. Von außen betrachtet mag das mandinga des Meisters den Anschein von Glück oder der Fähigkeit, die Realität zu seinem Vorteil zu biegen, erwecken, ohne offenkundige Anstrengung. Mandinga wird erlernt, nicht gelehrt, [9] und stellt den höchsten Ausdruck des Spiels dar. Es ist ein Schlüsselmerkmal der Identität eines geschickten Capoeirista. Obwohl der Mestre mandinga besitzt, besingt ein Capoeira-Lied feierlich, dass das Ende der Capoeira selbst für die weisesten Meister unbekannt ist, was auf den Respekt vor der erwarteten und fortgesetzten Entwicklung der Kunst hinweist.

In der Landschaft der Capoeira taucht die Figur des Mestre auch auf andere Weise auf, eng verbunden mit der Idee von Geschichte, Abstammung und dem Respekt vor dem Wissen der Vorfahren. Es gibt einen Liedtext, der übersetzt lautet: “Junge, wer hat dich geformt? Wer lehrte dich die Schönheit, im Kampf zu tanzen?”[10] Dies verdeutlicht, wie wichtig es ist, seine Wurzeln zu kennen und denjenigen zu danken, die dieses wertvolle Wissen an einen weitergegeben haben. Dies ist nicht so sehr Abstammung als Legitimation, wie es in vielen ostasiatischen Kampfkünsten wichtig sein mag. Im Gegenteil, es stellt die Herausforderung dar, eine tiefe Verbindung mit und aufrichtige Anerkennung dessen zu erhalten, woher das verkörperte Wissen stammt. Innerhalb der Capoeira-Gemeinschaft ist meine Identität als jogador (Spieler) für immer an diejenigen gebunden, von denen ich die Fähigkeit, im Kampf zu tanzen, geerbt habe. Es gibt keinen (respektvollen) Ort, um dies zu vergessen.

Krieger, Priester und Seeräuber

Die philippinische Kampfkunst Eskrima (die lokale Aussprache des spanischen Wortes für “Fechten”) ist eine praktische Form des Kampfes mit Baston (Stöcken) und Bolo (was man als “Arbeitsklingen” oder buschmesserähnliche Machete bezeichnen könnte). Entstanden ist Eskrima höchstwahrscheinlich aus einer einzigartigen Synergie von Elementen aus dem verbleibenden kulturellen Hintergrund der sino-malaiischen Kampfkünste und einer genialen philippinischen Umgestaltung der geometrischen Logik der spanischen Schwertkunst für lokale Waffen. [11]  Die frühe Entwicklung der Kunst bleibt ungewiss. Was sich mit einiger Sicherheit sagen lässt, ist, dass der Entwicklungsprozess der vielen Formen des Eskrima[12] über dreihundert Jahre der Kolonialisierung stattfand, in denen Jesuitenpriester den lokalen Kriegern die Schwertkunst lehrten,[13] durch Revolution und Rebellion während der Unabhängigkeitskämpfe verfeinert worden ist und in der Zeit vor dem Zweiten Weltkrieg durch die Gründung von Sportvereinen formalisiert wurde – und schliesslich 2009 offiziell als Nationalsport des Landes anerkannt worden ist.

Unter den in den Vereinigten Staaten lebenden Expat-Filipinos der Bürgerrechtszeit wurde die Kunst häufig als Kali bezeichnet. Diese Bezeichnung stammt von einem alten Tagalog-Wort (das “Geschicklichkeit mit Klingen” bedeutet), als eine Art Widerstand gegen die Verwendung des spanischen Lehnwortes Eskrima (das genau die Fähigkeit des Praktizierenden implizierte, einen Stock mit der Geschicklichkeit eines Schwertkämpfers zu führen, aber starke Konnotationen eines kolonialen Erbes trug). Wie Capoeira trägt auch die Sprache in dieser postkolonialen Kampfkunsttradition historische Spuren. Obwohl die Kali-Praktizierenden vielleicht einen vorspanischen Ursprung für ihre Kunst ausfindig machen wollten, scheinen sie wenig Schwierigkeiten gehabt zu haben, spanische Begriffe für viele ihrer Drills und Subsysteme zu verwenden: Engganyo (Finten oder Täuschung), Numerado (gemäss den Zahlen), Sombrada (ein Deckungs- und Konter-Drill), Espada y Daga (Schwert und Dolch), Abierta und Serrada (offene und geschlossene Wachpositionen), um nur einige Elemente der kampfsportbezogenen Lingua franca zu nennen. Dies obwohl während der Kolonialzeit die Zahl der Filipinos, die Spanisch sprechen konnten, nie mehr als 2.8% der Bevölkerung ausmachte.[14]

Dies deutet natürlich auf einen starken spanischen Einfluss hin, der sich auch in den zeitgenössischen Formen der Kunst niederschlägt, ebenso wie der offizielle Name der Kunst, Arnis de Mano (wörtlich: “Rüstung der Hand”). Wahrscheinlich bezieht sich dieser auf die Tatsache, dass die einzige Rüstung der Eskrimador während der Juego Todo (Faustkämpfe), die bis ins frühe 20. Jahrhundert andauerten, der Stock war.[15]  Ein anderer, häufiger Refrain verbindet den Begriff Arnis mit den Kostümen der Schauspieler in Moro Moro Stücken, in denen die christianisierten Visayan-Krieger, die Arnes (Rüstungen) tragen, die muslimischen “Piraten” von Mindinao erfolgreich zurückschlagen.[16] Solche Stücke rekonstruieren und wiederholen einen historischen Konflikt, der bis heute nachhallt.[17]

Die Geschichte weicht in der philippinischen Kampfkunsttradition schnell einem Mythos, da einige Eskrimadors die Geschichten aus der Vergangenheit ausschmücken, um in der Gegenwart Prestige für sich zu beanspruchen.[18]  Es ist gängige Praxis, die Kunst in jeder nachfolgenden Generation umzubenennen, was die Genealogien komplex macht, aber Innovation als einen Kernaspekt der Tradition legitimiert. Einst hauptsächlich in Familien oder Dörfern gelehrt, werden viele Eskrima-Stile wie kostbare Erbstücke behandelt, die nur mit wenigen vertrauenswürdigen Personen geteilt werden, was ihre Erhaltung zu einem heutigen Anliegen macht.

Postkolonialen Landschaften

Die Erforschung der Geschichte von Kampfkünsten, die aus postkolonialen Gemeinschaften hervorgegangen sind, stellt einzigartige Probleme dar, die über die Trennung von Fakten und Meinungen oder die Erstellung einer plausiblen Darstellung hinausreichen. Komplexe Empfindlichkeiten müssen navigiert werden. Als anglo-keltischer Erforscher dieser Künste bin ich mir bewusst, dass ich ein Gast in diesen Gefilden bin. In solchen postkolonialen (um nicht zu sagen “globalisierten”) Kampfkunstlandschaften mögen die historischen Ursprünge ungewiss sein. Jedoch wurden die Methoden über Generationen weitergegeben, ohne aber die Unterbrechung, die in Europa zu beobachten ist, wo es eine Rückkehr zu den Handbüchern des Mittelalters und der Renaissance gibt, um verlorene Traditionen der Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) zu rehabilitieren. Die Erforschung der kriegerischen Geschichtskultur in den ehemaligen Kolonien stellt angesichts der sichtbaren Hinterlassenschaften dieser Begegnungen zwischen Metropole und Peripherie einen interessanten Bezugspunkt für diese Arbeit dar; und kriegerische Traditionen bieten überraschende Einblicke in kulturelle Werte, Identitäten und Geschichten.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Paul Bowman, Deconstructing Martial Arts (Cardiff: Cardiff University Press, 2019). Free, open access version available online: https://doi.org/10.18573/book1
  • Mark V. Wiley, Filipino Martial Culture (Tokyo: Tuttle, 1996).
  • Greg Downey, Learning Capoeira: Lessons in cunning from an Afro-Brazilian art (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2005).

Webressourcen

  • Axé Capoeira Brazilian Martial Arts Documentary Vancouver 2009. Available online: https://youtu.be/c6WnkJGcwbw (letzter Zugriff 29. März 2021).
  • Fighting Sticks of Arnis Trailer (Empty Mind Films). Available Online: https://youtu.be/UjtD4vN0EfM (letzter Zugriff 29. März 2021).
  • “Learning in Capoeira’s roda: The ritual space of the Afro-Brazilian martial art,” Paper presented by Robert Parkes in the “Na volta que mundo deu, Na volta que mundo da: Ritualised initiations and personal transformations in Capoeira, the Afro-Brazilian martial art” Symposium at the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia Conference, Newcastle, 2nd December 2017. Video available online: https://youtu.be/vabNSdrNABU (letzter Zugriff 29. März 2021).

_____________________

[1] Ned R. Nepangue und Celestino C. Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima: Beyond the Myth (USA: Xlibris Corporation, 2007).
[2] Sixt Wetzler, “Martial Arts Studies as Kulturwissenschaft,” Martial Arts Studies 1 (2015), S. 20–33.
[3] Paul Bowman, “The Tradition of Invention: On Authenticity in Traditional Asian Martial Arts,” in East Asian Pedagogies: Education as Formation and Transformation Across Cultures and Borders, ed. David Lewin und Karsten Kenklies (Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature Switzerland, 2020), S. 205–225.
[4] Paul Bowman, Deconstructing Martial Arts (Cardiff: Cardiff University Press, 2019), S. 58.
[5] “Breaking and Capoeira,” zuletzt aufgerufen 10. März 2021,  https://www.breakingandcapoeira.com/2019/02/the-influence-of-capoeira-on-breaking.html (letzter Zugriff 29. März 2021).
[6] Greg Downey, Learning Capoeira: Lessons in Cunning from an Afro-Brazilian Art (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2005), S. 74–86; vgl. Matthias Röhrig Assunção, “Chapter 9: History and Memory in Capoeira Lyrics from Bahia, Brazil,” in Cultures of the Lusophone Black Atlantic, eds. Nancy Priscilla Naro, Roger Sansi-Roca, und David H. Treece (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), S. 199–217.
[7] Sergio González Varela, “Mandinga: Power and Deception in Afro-Brazilian Capoeira,” Social Analysis 57, no. 2 (2013), S.7.
[8] Varela, “Mandinga,” p. 8.
[9] Varela, “Mandinga,” p. 8.
[10] Ronaldo Santos, zit. in Nestor Capoeira, Capoeira: Roots of the Dance-Fight-Game (Berkley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2002), S. 19.
[11] Nepangue und Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima.
[12] Bis heute sind über 70 technisch unterschiedliche Formen der philippinischen Kampfkunst auf den Philippinen dokumentiert. See Mark Wiley, Filipino Martial Culture (Tokyo: Tuttle, 1996), S. 23.
[13] Nepangue und Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima, S. 67–78.
[14] Nepangue und Macachor, Cebuano Eskrima, S. 56–57.
[15] Rey Carlo T. Gonzales, “Filipino Martial Arts and the Construction of Filipino National Identity” (PhD diss., University of Manchester, 2015), S. 49.
[16] Felipe P. Joxano Jr., “Arnis: A Question of Origins,” Rapid Journal 2, no. 4 (1997): 15- 17.
[17] Ruel A. Macaraeg, “Pirates of the Philippines: A Critical Thinking Exercise,” in Filipino Martial Art Anthology, ed. Michael A. DeMarco (Santa Fe, NM: Via Media Publishing Company, 2017), 94–106.
[18] Gonzales, “Filipino Martial Arts.”

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Der Autor mit seinem Maestro Paolo Pagaling in Metro Manila im Jahr 2019 © Robert J. Parkes.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Parkes, Robert J.: History Culture, Identity, and the Post-Colonial Martial Arts of Capoeira and Eskrima. In: Public History Weekly 9 (2021) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17815.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Marko Demantowsky

Translated from German by Dr Mark Kyburz (http://www.englishprojects.ch/home)

Copyright (c) 2021 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 9 (2021) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17815

Tags: , , , ,

1 reply »

  1. To all our non-English speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 11 languages. Just copy and paste.

    OPEN PEER REVIEW

    Fighting is Writing

    This paper offers a salient point of entry into the complexities of martial arts from a post-colonial perspective. The author highlights the “art” in “martial”, as it were, in a compact, concise and unpretentious way. In his portrayal of Capoeira and Eskrima, heavy metal researcher Laina Dawe’s motto “writing is fighting” is being inverted, so to speak: “fighting is writing”. Particularly the Afro-Brazilian martial art Capoeira, invented by slaves in the 18th century, is discussed as a sophisticated, genuinely interdisciplinary hybrid (involving dance, sport, art, several types of verbal and non-verbal communication) on the intersection of tradition and innovation – a hybrid that tells a collective story and invents new personal stories.

    The author’s reference to a Capoeira song which “celebrates that Capoeira’s ends are unknown, even to the wisest of masters, suggesting a respect for the expected and continued evolution of the art” is a relevant source for future research on creativity and innovation. The culture of Capoeira supports the assumption that creativity emerges from playfulness, openness, allusion, metaphor, idiosyncratic encoding (cf. “signifying” and “battle rap” in Hip Hop), not from instrumental techniques or programs which promise to exploit creativity as a resource. Accordingly, the Capoeiristas themselves conceive of their practice not (only) as a fight but decidedly as a game. European researchers on aesthetics may feel reminded of Friedrich Schiller and his insistence on the playfulness of the aesthetic sensibility as a precondition for reason, or of philosopher Peter Sloterdijk who in a 2020 interview implicitly referred to Schiller when stating that human progress means “taking artificial dangers. When dangers become artificial, then one has actually reached the goal of life, because as long as one has to struggle with real dangers, the release into the playful mode of being has not been achieved.”[1] However, the author outlines that respect of tradition is paramount as well in Capoeira, clearly expressed by the “importance placed on knowing your roots, and giving thanks to those who have passed on this precious knowledge to you”. This emphasis on “roots” has political undertones, given the history of slavery in Brazil and the persistence of racism in the present day.In popular culture, the nexus of Capoeira, creativity, politics, and history is well known. Just think of Brazilian metal band Sepultura’s music video for “Roots, Bloody Roots”. In the beginning, a quote by Albert Chinụalụmọgụ „Chinua“ Achebe (“suffering should be creative[,] should give birth to something good and lovely”) is followed by a scene showing Capoeira fighters/artists practicing their skills. The next scene shows a Christian Cross, the symbol of the colonizing power, followed by the band performing with Timbalada drummers. These scenes strongly resonate with the “importance placed on knowing your roots” mentioned in the paper, while reconciling roots with contemporary pop culture.

    As for Eskrima, portrayed in lesser detail in the paper, the author convincingly points out the transcultural dimension of the martial art which, until today, is subject of constant transformation and re-interpretation: “there is evidence for Eskrima being an adaptation of Spanish swordsmanship taught to Christianised Filipinos by Jesuit ‘warrior’ Priests to repulse a perceived Muslim pirate threat from the South. In the search for identity, and history, language becomes a surprising ally.” Attempts at essentializing the sport through myth-making in the course of nation-building are thwarted through disinterested glances at the past; a past that resists the purification of tradition – again, fighting appears as writing; writing of history, writing of culture, writing of politics.

    The author’s nuanced and balanced approach has also its deficiencies. When the author states: “martial traditions offer surprising insights into cultural values, identities, and histories”, this is certainly true. But it is also rhetorical. Is there actually something that does not offer “surprising insights into cultural values, identities, and histories”? The rise of Cultural Studies has shown that even seemingly trivial, stereotypical objects or phenomena offer such insights and are embedded in potentially infinite webs of meaning-making. Hence, the assertion is a truism. The author tends to be evasive here: what is so surprising? And regarding which expectations? If expectations are uninformed and clichéd, then almost everything is surprising. But knowledge of the cultural complexity of martial arts and their interrelationships with other disciplines is nothing new; in fact, it is well-researched, for instance with respect to the work of Yukio Mishima or Yves Klein. Nonetheless, this paper is a valid and fortunately non-ideological take on the subject. A point of entry, as mentioned above. There is more fighting to be done. And even more playing.

    [1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTt6H57WC2w

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest