How Much and Which Europe in a History Book?

Wieviel und welches Europa im Geschichtsbuch?


At a time when the further development of European integration is more uncertain than ever, our institutions’ ability to act seems limited, the overstretching becomes apparent and the influence of non-European actors on the continent increases, the question arises as to what the perspectives of Europe then are.[1] Has Europe become a self-blocking illusion or does it grow with its conflicts? And how does one deal with all these issues in the classroom? How can a European (also a political) history of integration be written and imparted without a teleologically reduced conception against the background of historical complexity and an open finality which, in fact, includes the entire continent?[2]

Centre as Periphery

From Switzerland’s point of view, a country whose population is aware of living right in the centre of Europe, but throws a peripheral glance at the European integration process, the matters of fact represent themselves in a twofold way: How can the history of one’s own country be integrated into the one of the entire continent and is the history of the European integration presented as peace work or as restriction of national sovereignty? The fact is: The small state of Switzerland is part of a conflict-laden pattern of the European balance of power and the latter constitutes Switzerland’s basis of existence. A state system which had been built against the stream of European development and whose historicity is the primary glue of Swiss identification, is particularly virulently faced with the questions as to what the economic consequences of keeping out of the European integration process are.[3]

For a long time, the history textbooks from Switzerland were characterized by the widespread notion that the history of Europe had taken place as a history of individual nation states. Since from the perspective of the small state its own history cannot be world-shattering, the representations of neighboring countries became very weighty. When examining less recent textbooks it moreover becomes apparent that in none of the books the political dimension of the European integration was duly highlighted.[5]

The accesses in the current textbooks “Zeitreise” (time travel) as well as “Gesellschaften im Wandel” (societies in transition) present themselves as newly designed and very much in line with the discourses of historical research. Both the textbooks are based on Curriculum 21 for German-speaking Switzerland which, above all else, gives a list of competences: “Students are able to perceive and judge Switzerland’s positioning within Europe and the world.” References to Europe are kept sober and formulated in a competence-oriented way. Thus, students are able to list “phases of the European unification and thereby characterize the position of Switzerland.”[6]

Integrated by Europeanization

But how shall we represent Europe and what do we represent? Alone the question already what Europe is causes historians to rack their brains. According to its history Europe is a heterogeneous and pluralistic continent. They agree that Europe can neither geographically nor historically be defined clearly and that each terminological definition is political. This became manifest during the era of the Cold War in which the designation mainly stood for the western part of the continent.[7]

Consequently, there is no European master narrative in new textbooks either and a European identity according to the national style can even less be deduced. An analysis of the new textbooks is thus also aimed at categories which make that the *Europ*(like that the search term by means of the corpus-linguistic software) becomes apparent broadly distributed in the textbooks and interlinked with different topics. In “Zeitreise” there are 483 “concordance hits” and in “Gesellschaften im Wandel” there are 541. More frequent mentions of the term Europe can be found with the topics: Expansion of Europe with discoveries, the Napoleonic era and the Congress of Vienna, racism as well as colonialism and imperialism, the world wars and their impact (in the context of the Nazi extermination policy in Europe), the Cold War and European integration. In particular categorial allocations can be derived from the denominations. Thus, Europe is used as a mere spatial term. The reference to a “Europe of culture” shows most identifying elements of all the categories. The “Europe of common structures” reflects transnational approaches. The “integrated Europe” stands for integration developments after the Second World War, whereas the “Europeanization” stands for striding forward into the world as well as the transformation of Europe and the world through Europe whereby only then a coherent history of Europe could be created. “Switzerland in Europe” constitutes a further category. Here Europe is the “reference size” into which the country is embedded geographically as well as politically-culturally.

With the means of “Europeanization” Switzerland is included. The “neutral” landlocked state and its societies are thus also more strongly perceived as actors in all the happenings, be it with a view to colonialism, racism, but also the general economic affairs right through to the cultural exchange.

The New “We”

Swiss textbooks deal with Europe in a sober way, in particular with the “integrated Europe”. The current mediation of history takes place without pathos. This is due to competence orientation. The pathway of an integrated Europe is basically left open and, other than the EU, also the Council of Europe and other forms of integration are mentioned. Against the background of different perspectives and approaches, this has its justification. Europe can be interpreted as peace work which above all had to solve the German question and still has. But it is also, in the sense of Timothy Snyder, a substitute for the old imperialist policy of the major European powers and much less an association for small states which become aware of their powerlessness.[8] Both the textbooks are thus characterized by a sober and reflected reference to Europe, as far as the integrated Europe is concerned which encompasses up to 30% of all the references to Europe. For the most part, Europe, however, appears as a transnational networked continent and just exactly with a view to the Europeanization a new “we” will be created.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Altermatt, Urs. Die Schweiz in Europa. Antithese, Modell oder Biotop? Frauenfeld: Huber, 2011.
  • Holenstein, André. Mitten in Europa. Verflechtungen und Abgrenzungen in der Schweizer Geschichte. Baden: Hier und Jetzt, 2014.
  • Robert, Kagan. “Die Rückkehr der deutschen Frage.” Blätter für deutsche und internationale Politik 5 (2019): 63-73.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Cf. Herfried Münkler, “Die EU ist porös geworden,” Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 13. Mai 2019, 8.
[2] Cf. also Wilfried Loth, Europas Einigung. Eine unvollendete Geschichte (Frankfurt am Main: Campus Verlag, 2014).
[3] Cf. Markus Furrer, “Konstanten im Europabild der Schweizerinnen und Schweizer,” in Europäische Geschichtskultur – Europäische Geschichtspolitik. Vom Erfinden, Entdecken, Erarbeiten der Bedeutung von Erinnerung für das Verständnis und Selbstverständnis Europas, eds. Christoph Kühberger and Clemens Sedmak, (Innsbruck: Studienverlag, 2009): 248-263.
[4] Markus Furrer, “Die Schweiz erzählen – Europa erzählen – die Welt erzählen … Wandel und Funktion von Narrativen in Schweizer Geschichtslehrmitteln,” in Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Geschichte 1 (2009): 56-77.
[5] Cf. Anton Hauler, “Die Schweiz auf dem Weg nach Europa. Politikprobleme und Dilemmata politischer Bildung,” in Reihe europäische Bildung 15 (1994): 229-245.
[6] Curriculum 21: https://lu.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=a|6|4|8|0|3 (last accessed 16 may 2019)
[7] Cf. Timothy Garton Ash, Im Namen Europas. Deutschland und der geteilte Kontinent (Frankfurt am Main: Hanser, 1972): 572.
[8] Markus Ziener, “Der Historiker Timothy Snyder: «Es gibt keine Rückkehr zum Nationalstaat»,” in Neue Zürcher Zeitung 30 January 2019, https://www.nzz.ch/feuilleton/der-historiker-timothy-snyder-es-gibt-keine-rueckkehr-zum-nationalstaat-ld.1455135 (last accessed 16 may 2019).

_____________________

Image Credits

Die Grenze zwischen Schweiz und Deutschland © 2012 CC BY 3.0 qwesy qwesy via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Furrer, Markus: How Much and Which Europe in a History Book? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 22, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14013.

Translated by Kurt Brügger swissamericanlanguageexpert

Editorial Responsibility

Rachel Huber / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

In einer Zeit, in der die Weiterentwicklung der europäischen Integration ungewisser ist denn je, die Handlungsfähigkeit ihrer Institutionen eingeschränkt scheint, die Überdehnung offenkundig wird und der Einfluss aussereuropäischer Akteure auf den Kontinent zunimmt, stellt sich die Frage nach den Perspektiven Europas.[1] Ist Europa zur sich selbst blockierenden Illusion geworden, oder wächst es an seinen Konflikten? Und wie geht man im Unterricht damit um? Wie lässt sich eine europäische (auch politische) Integrationsgeschichte ohne teleologisch reduzierte Konzeption schreiben und vermitteln vor dem Hintergrund historischer Komplexität und einer offenen Finalität, die zudem den ganzen Kontinent miteinbezieht?[2]

Mit peripherem Blick mittendrin

Aus der Optik der Schweiz, eines Landes, dessen Bevölkerung sich bewusst ist, mitten in Europa zu leben, aber auf den europäischen Integrationsprozess einen peripheren Blick wirft, stellt sich der Sachverhalt in zweifacher Weise dar: Wie kann die Geschichte des eigenen Landes in jene des Kontinents eingebunden werden und stellt man die Geschichte der europäischen Integration als Friedenswerk oder als Vereinnahmung nationaler Souveränität dar? Fakt ist: Der schweizerische Kleinstaat ist Teil eines konfliktuellen Musters des europäischen Gleichgewichts und findet darin seine Existenzgrundlage. Einem Staatswesen, das sich gegen den Strom der europäischen Entwicklung geformt hatte und dessen Historizität primärer Kitt schweizerischer Identifikation bildet, stellen sich Fragen nach den ökonomischen Folgen des Abseitsstehens im europäischen Integrationsprozess besonders virulent.[3]

Lange Zeit dominierte in Geschichtslehrmitteln aus der Schweiz die verbreitete Darstellung, die Geschichte Europas als Geschichte einzelner Nationalstaaten ablaufen zu lassen.[4] Da aus der Optik des Kleinstaates die eigene Geschichte nicht weltbewegend sein kann, erhielten die Darstellungen von Nachbarländern breites Gewicht. Offenkundig beim Sichten älterer Lehrmittel wird zudem, dass die politische Dimension der europäischen Integration in keinem der Bücher gebührend hervorgehoben worden ist.[5]

Neu konzipiert und im breiten Einklang mit Diskursen der historischen Forschung zeigen sich die Zugänge in den aktuellen Lehrmitteln “Zeitreise” sowie “Gesellschaften im Wandel”. Beide Lehrwerke basieren auf dem Lehrplan 21 für die deutschsprachige Schweiz, der Kompetenzen aufzählt: “Die Schülerinnen und Schüler können die Positionierung der Schweiz in Europa und der Welt wahrnehmen und beurteilen.” Europabezüge sind nüchtern gehalten und kompetenzorientiert formuliert. So können Schüler*innen “Phasen der europäischen Einigung aufzählen und dabei die Position der Schweiz charakterisieren.”[6]

Durch Europäisierung integriert

Doch wie stellen wir Europa dar und was stellen wir dar? Allein schon die Frage, was Europa ist, bewirkt bei Historiker*innen Kopfzerbrechen. Europa ist ein seiner Geschichte nach heterogener und pluralistischer Kontinent. Sie sind sich einig, dass Europa weder geografisch noch historisch klar zu fassen ist und jede begriffliche Definition politisch ist. Manifest wurde dies im Zeitalter des Kalten Krieges, wo die Bezeichnung vor allem für den Westen des Kontinents stand.[7]

Folgerichtig findet sich in den neuen Lehrmitteln auch keine europäische Meistererzählung und noch weniger lässt sich eine europäische Identität nach der nationalen Fasson herleiten. Eine Analyse der neuen Lehrmittel zielt denn auch auf Kategorien ab, die *europ* (so der Suchbegriff mittels corpuslinguistischer Software) breit verteilt in den Lehrmitteln und verzahnt mit unterschiedlichen Themen hervortreten lässt. In der “Zeitreise” finden sich 483 „Concordance Hits“ und in Gesellschaften im Wandel deren 541. Verdichtete Europanennungen finden sich bei den Themen: Expansion Europas mit Entdeckungen, Napoleonischer Zeit und Wiener Kongress, Rassismus sowie Kolonialismus und Imperialismus, Weltkriege und die Folgen (im Kontext der nationalsozialistischen Vernichtungspolitik in Europa), Kalter Krieg und Europäische Integration. Aus den Nennungen lassen sich insbesondere kategorielle Zuordnungen herleiten. So wird Europa etwa als reiner Raumbegriff verwendet. Der Bezug zu einem “Kultureuropa” weist am stärksten von allen Kategorien identifikatorische Elemente auf. Das “Europa gemeinsamer Strukturen” bildet transnationale Ansätze ab. Das “integrierte Europa” steht für die Integrationsentwicklungen nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg, während die “Europäisierung” für das Ausgreifen auf die Welt wie auch Verwandlung Europas und der Welt durch Europa steht, wodurch erst eine zusammenhängende europäische Geschichte geschaffen werden konnte. Eine weitere Kategorie bildet die “Schweiz in Europa”. Europa ist hier Referenzgrösse, in die das Land geografisch sowie politisch-kulturell eingebettet wird.

Mit dem Mittel der “Europäisierung” wird die Schweiz einbezogen. Der “neutrale” Binnenstaat und dessen Gesellschaften werden so auch stärker als Akteure im Geschehen wahrgenommen, sei dies mit Blick auf den Kolonialismus, den Rassismus, aber auch dem generellen Wirtschaftsgeschehen bis hin zum kulturellen Austausch.

Das neue “Wir”

Schweizerische Lehrmittel gehen nüchtern mit Europa um, insbesondere mit dem “integrierten Europa”. Aktuelle Geschichtsvermittlung erfolgt ohne Pathos. Das ist der Kompetenzorientierung geschuldet. Der Weg des integrierten Europa wird grundsätzlich offen gelassen und es werden neben der EU auch der Europarat und andere Integrationsformen erwähnt. Vor dem Hintergrund verschiedener Perspektiven und Ansätze hat dies seine Berechtigung. Europa lässt sich als Friedenswerk interpretieren, das vor allem die deutsche Frage zu lösen hatte und hat. Es ist aber auch im Sinne von Timothy Snyder ein Ersatz für die alte Imperialpolitik der grossen europäischen Mächte und weniger eine Verbindung für Kleinstaaten, die sich ihrer Ohnmacht bewusst werden.[8]

Den beiden Lehrmitteln ist somit ein nüchterner und reflektierter Europabezug eigen, was das integriert Europa betrifft, das gegen 30 Prozent der Europabezüge einnimmt. Zur Hauptsache erscheint jedoch Europa als transnational vernetzter Kontinent und gerade mit Blick auf die Europäisierung wird ein neues “Wir” geschaffen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Altermatt, Urs. Die Schweiz in Europa. Antithese, Modell oder Biotop? Frauenfeld: Huber, 2011.
  • Holenstein, André. Mitten in Europa. Verflechtungen und Abgrenzungen in der Schweizer Geschichte. Baden: Hier und Jetzt, 2014.
  • Robert, Kagan. “Die Rückkehr der deutschen Frage.” Blätter für deutsche und internationale Politik 5 (2019): 63-73.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Herfried Münkler, “Die EU ist porös geworden,” Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 13. Mai 2019, 8.
[2] Siehe hier auch den Ansatz von Wilfried Loth, Europas Einigung. Eine unvollendete Geschichte (Frankfurt am Main: Campus Verlag, 2014).
[3] Markus Furrer, “Konstanten im Europabild der Schweizerinnen und Schweizer,” in Europäische Geschichtskultur – Europäische Geschichtspolitik. Vom Erfinden, Entdecken, Erarbeiten der Bedeutung von Erinnerung für das Verständnis und Selbstverständnis Europas, eds. Christoph Kühberger and Clemens Sedmak, (Innsbruck: Studienverlag, 2009): 248-263.
[4] Markus Furrer, “Die Schweiz erzählen – Europa erzählen – die Welt erzählen … Wandel und Funktion von Narrativen in Schweizer Geschichtslehrmitteln,” in Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Geschichte 1 (2009): 56-77.
[5] Anton Hauler, “Die Schweiz auf dem Weg nach Europa. Politikprobleme und Dilemmata politischer Bildung,” in Reihe europäische Bildung 15 (1994): 229-245.
[6] Curriculum 21: https://lu.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=a|6|4|8|0|3 (letzter Zugriff 16. Mai 2019)
[7] Timothy Garton Ash, Im Namen Europas. Deutschland und der geteilte Kontinent (Frankfurt am Main: Hanser, 1972): 572.
[8] Markus Ziener, “Der Historiker Timothy Snyder: «Es gibt keine Rückkehr zum Nationalstaat»,” in Neue Zürcher Zeitung 30. Januar 2019, https://www.nzz.ch/feuilleton/der-historiker-timothy-snyder-es-gibt-keine-rueckkehr-zum-nationalstaat-ld.1455135 (letzter Zugriff 16. Mai 2019).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Die Grenze zwischen Schweiz und Deutschland © 2012 CC BY 3.0 qwesy qwesy via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Furrer, Markus: How Much and Which Europe in a History Book? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 22, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14013.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Rachel Huber / Peter Gautschi (Team Luzern)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 22
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14013

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest