Time and History (in) of the Grand Coalition

Zeit und Geschichte (in) der Großen Koalition


The agreement of the new German Grand Coalition which after intricate negotiations can now start its work has already undergone different analyses. It was analyzed in political terms, was closely examined with a view to so-called “future issues” and has already been made an object of interest as a linguistic-literary document.[1] But this coalition agreement is also noteworthy with regard to Public History – and to the historical classification of the present.

In the penultimate Position

It may not come as a surprise that the topics media, culture and attitude to the past appear in the penultimate position in the coalition agreement (chapter XIII), immediately preceding the descriptions of the rules of procedure and mode of operation of the coalition. That these issues do not have the same importance as the explanations on the social and environmental policy, on economy, on infrastructure or family may be understandable. The topic of culture is, however, put immediately after the explanations on the foreign and security policy, and thus not placed too far away from a crucial policy area (and the chapter of education and research has even taken quite a leap forward and has landed in section IV).

What is hereby said on the importance of the historical within the framework of the government work, can certainly be expected. The particular historical responsibility is referred to, the way it arises from the history of the 20th century and reduced to the well-known formula “Without memory no future”. Even though faced with a lack of content-related novelty, one may well pause for a moment and consider it to be noteworthy that issues of the public conveyance of history have managed to be included into the self-description of a future German Federal Government.

“Public History” as Government Work

Thereby the explanations in fact become more concrete. The memory culture shall continue to be supported and the memorial work be promoted. Apart from the problematization of the National Socialism, the SED dictatorship shall also continue to be made a subject of discussion. It can be considered remarkable that even the post-colonial debate has had a certain impact on the coalition agreement since Germany’s colonial responsibility is also given attention.

But despite all these pleasing mentions, from the perspective of the Public History, one also still has to have the impression that the historical only then finds the necessary attention in public when it originates from the past century. The loss of a historical distance relationship can also be discovered in the coalition agreement all over.[2] The inevitable anniversary fuss which may neither be missing also gives witness of this. With the political blessing from the very top the following historical events shall be celebrated in the upcoming legislative period: 70 years of German Basic Law, 100 years of the end of the First Word War, 75 years of the end of the Second Word War, 100 years of Women’s suffrage, 100 years of the Weimar Republic, 30 years of the Peaceful Revolution and 30 years of German Unity.

The first Thing

But, in such a coalition agreement, historical topics, in fact, play not only a role in sections in which they are directly addressed. Each document of this kind is always also a form of self-historicization. According to discursivized argumentation schemata a certain policy can only be justified by its historical classification (and not by a divine order or the almost mystical insight into the overall interconnections of the architecture of the world or other variants). Correspondingly, “history” as a public issue does not only play a role in connection with the cultural policy, but also as self-foundation of the Grand Coalition as a whole.

The preambles of such agreement texts may definitely be given greater attention. Even if they are under the well-founded suspicion of serving as a means of largely disseminating empty phrases, they, against a discourse-analytical background, provide important insights into the (auto-historicizing) self-conception of the collective authorship.

Already the somehow cumbersome title of the agreement calls attention to a basic irritation and, on the other hand, there is an attempt to divide the agreement into epochs: Because much has obviously become mixed up, everything has now to be new: “A new awakening for Europe. New dynamics for Germany. New cohesion for our country”. And why does everything have to be new? Because we, thus the in politicians’ jargon readily used and also here applied empty formula, experience “new political times with various challenges for Germany”.

New Times?

Already in the very first text line of the agreement thus “new times” and therefore the modernist standard argument are evoked which still had to provide a justification for all the innovations: We have now left the old world behind us, we will now departure into unprecedented “new times” and therefore also have to adopt totally new measures (which, upon a closer look, appear rather well-known). But just as in fashion the deeper meaning of the latest trend consists in being replaced by the next trend,[3] and just as in art each just proclaimed modernity has the purpose of serving the next following modernity as a negative contrasting foil, in exactly the same way the “new times” last for one legislative period at most.

The reference to the more recent (or more distant) past is completed by the expectable counterpart of a future perspective which puts forward the well-known keywords of growth, dynamics, security and progress. Thus, this coalition agreement itself gets caught between a past in which certainly not everything was bad, but which now calls for a ‘new awakening’ anyway, and a future version in which for everybody everything shall become better. This form of historical self-description does not only appear bland for the reason that the respective shaping of the future can already look back onto a very long past, but because with their linearity they seem to provide no alternatives at all.

Without any problems we are able to see through these pseudo-historicizing arguments – and yet cannot do anything against it. In a relentlessly prehistoric culture one’s own significance can only be justified by the fact that one at least claims to have left one’s own distinctive footprint on the imaginary linear timeline. It might be a possibility to reconsider and to change this very time model – also and just exactly by means of the historical sciences. This would unquestionably be a more laborious matter. It would neither be likely to take place quickly and unproblematically. But, it would offer the chance to give another importance to questions concerning time and history, in order to not only reduce them to ensuring identity forming which has to be put in question again and again, but to provide space for the temporality of people and culture in their complexity – and then perhaps to ensure another political self-conception which does not need to permanently concern itself with proclaiming new times and epochs. Then the empty phrases included in the coalition agreements could be thrown overboard as well.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Elias, Norbert. Über die Zeit. Arbeiten zur Wissenssoziologie II. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 1988.
  • Nassehi, Armin. Die Zeit der Gesellschaft. Auf dem Weg zu einer soziologischen Theorie der Zeit. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, 2008.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Marc Reichwein, “Magisch einlullende Verben. Was taugt der GroKo-Vertrag als Literatur?,” www.welt.de/Magisch-einlullende-Verben-Was-taugt-der-GroKo-Vertrag-als-Literatur (last accessed 8 March 2018).
[2] Karl Heinz Bohrer, Ekstasen der Zeit. Augenblick, Gegenwart, Erinnerung (München/Wien: Hanser, 2003), 10.
[3] Elena, Esposito, Die Verbindlichkeit des Vorübergehenden. Paradoxien der Mode (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2004).

_____________________

Image Credits

Signing of the coalition agreement for the 19th election period of the Bundestag: Olaf Scholz, Angela Merkel, Horst Seehofer © Sandro Halank, 12 March 2018, CC BY-SA 3.0, www.wikimedia.org/Unterzeichnung_des_Koalitionsvertrages_by_Sandro_Halank (last accessed 15 March 2018).

Recommended Citation

Landwehr, Achim: English Title. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 14, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11531

Editorial Responsibility

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Der Vertrag der neuen Großen Koalition in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, die nach verwickelten Verhandlungen nun ihre Arbeit aufnehmen kann, ist bereits verschiedenen Analysen unterzogen worden. Er wurde in politischer Hinsichten untersucht, wurde abgeklopft mit Blick auf so genannte ‘Zukunftsthemen’ und ist auch schon als sprachlich-literarisches Dokument zum Gegenstand gemacht worden.[1] Aber dieser Koalitionsvertrag hat auch etwas zu sagen zur Public History – und zur historischen Einordnung der Gegenwart.

Das Vorletzte

Es mag wenig überraschend sein, wenn die Themen Medien, Kultur und Verhalten zur Vergangenheit im Koalitionsvertrag an vorletzter Stelle auftauchen (Kapitel XIII), unmittelbar vor den Ausführungen zur Geschäftsordnung und zur Arbeitsweise der Koalition. Dass diese Bereiche nicht den gleichen Stellenwert einnehmen wie die Ausführungen zur Sozial- oder Umweltpolitik, zu Wirtschaft, Infrastruktur oder Familie, mag nachvollziehbar sein. Immerhin steht das Thema Kultur unmittelbar nach den Ausführungen zur Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik, und damit nicht allzu weit entfernt von einem zentralen Politikfeld (und das Kapitel Bildung und Forschung hat es sogar recht weit nach vorne geschafft und ist in Abschnitt IV gelandet).

Was hierbei zur Bedeutung des Historischen im Rahmen der Regierungsarbeit gesagt wird, ist durchaus erwartbar. Es wird verwiesen auf die besondere historische Verantwortung, wie sie sich aus der Geschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts ergibt und die auf die wohlbekannte Formel “Ohne Erinnerung keine Zukunft” gebracht wird. Doch auch angesichts eines Mangels inhaltlicher Novität darf man durchaus für einen kurzen Moment innehalten und es als bemerkenswert ansehen, dass es Fragen öffentlicher Geschichtsvermittlung in die Selbstbeschreibung einer künftigen Bundesregierung geschafft haben.

‘Public History’ als Regierungsaufgabe

Die Ausführungen werden dabei durchaus konkreter. Die Erinnerungskultur soll weiterhin gestützt und die Gedenkstättenarbeit gefördert werden. Neben die Problematisierung des Nationalsozialismus soll auch weiterhin die Thematisierung der SED-Diktatur gehören. Als bemerkenswert kann gelten, dass selbst die postkoloniale Diskussion im Koalitionsvertrag ihren Niederschlag gefunden hat, weil auch der kolonialistischen Verantwortung Deutschlands Raum gegeben wird.

Aber trotz all dieser aus Sicht der Public History erfreulichen Nennungen muss man auch weiterhin den Eindruck haben, dass Historisches in der Öffentlichkeit nur dann seinen Platz findet, wenn es dem vergangenen Jahrhundert entstammt. Der Verlust eines historischen Fernverhältnisses ist auch in diesem Koalitionsvertrag allenthalben zu entdecken.[2] Davon zeugt auch das unvermeidliche Jubiläumsgesumse, das ebenfalls nicht fehlen darf. Mit politischer Segnung von ganz oben sollen in der anstehenden Legislaturperiode gefeiert werden: 70 Jahre Grundgesetz, 100 Jahre Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges, 75 Jahre Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges, 100 Jahre Frauenwahlrecht, 100 Jahre Weimarer Republik, 30 Jahre Friedliche Revolution und 30 Jahre Deutsche Einheit.

Das Erste

Aber historische Themen spielen in einem solchen Koalitionsvertrag ja nicht nur in Abschnitten eine Rolle, in denen sie unmittelbar angesprochen werden. Jedes Dokument dieser Art ist immer auch eine Form der Selbsthistorisierung. Begründen lässt sich eine bestimmte Politik gemäß diskursivierter Argumentationsschemata nur über seine historische Einordnung (und nicht über einen göttlichen Auftrag oder die nahezu mystische Einsicht in die Gesamtzusammenhänge des Weltenbaus oder andere Varianten). Dementsprechend spielt ‘Geschichte’ als öffentliches Thema nicht nur im Zusammenhang mit der Kulturpolitik eine Rolle, sondern als Selbstfundierung der Großen Koalition insgesamt.

Den Präambeln solcher Vertragstexte darf durchaus größere Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt werden. Auch wenn sie in dem durchaus begründeten Verdacht stehen, vor allem der Verbreitung weitgehend inhaltsleerer Phrasen zu dienen, offenbaren sie vor einem diskursanalytischen Hintergrund wichtige Einsichten in das (autohistorisierende) Selbstverständnis der kollektiven Autorenschaft.

Schon der etwas umständliche Titel des Vertrags macht einerseits auf eine Grundirritation aufmerksam und versucht sich andererseits in Sachen Epochalisierung: Weil offenbar vieles durcheinander geraten ist, muss nun alles neu werden: “Ein neuer Aufbruch für Europa. Eine neue Dynamik für Deutschland. Ein neuer Zusammenhalt für unser Land”. Und warum muss alles neu werden? Weil wir, so die im Politsprech gerne verwendete und auch hier zum Einsatz kommende Leerformel, “neue politische Zeiten mit vielfältigen Herausforderungen für Deutschland” erleben.

Neue Zeiten?

Schon in der allerersten Textzeile des Vertrags werden also ‘neue Zeiten’ und damit das modernistische Standardargument heraufbeschworen, dass noch alle Neuerungen zu begründen hatte: Die alte Welt haben wir nun hinter uns gelassen, wir treten nun in so noch nie dagewesene ‘neue Zeiten’ ein und müssen dafür auch gänzlich neue Maßnahmen ergreifen (die bei näherem Hinsehen doch recht bekannt anmuten). Aber genauso wie in der Mode der tiefere Sinn des neuesten Trends darin besteht, vom nächsten Trend abgelöst zu werden,[3] und genauso wie in der Kunst jede gerade ausgerufene Moderne den Zweck hat, der darauf folgenden Moderne als negative Kontrastfolie zu dienen, so halten auch in der Politik die ‘neuen Zeiten’ höchstens eine Legislaturperiode.

Ergänzt wird der Hinweis auf die jüngere (oder auch fernere) Vergangenheit durch den erwartbaren Gegenpart einer Zukunftsperspektive, die mit den bekannten Stichworten von Wachstum, Dynamik, Sicherheit und Fortschritt aufwartet. Damit klemmt sich dieser Koalitionsvertrag selbst ein zwischen einer Vergangenheit, in der sicherlich nicht alles schlecht war, die aber nun doch einen ‘neuen Aufbruch’ erfordert, und einer Zukunftsversion, in der alles für alle besser werden soll. Diese Form historischer Selbstbeschreibung wirkt nicht nur deswegen fade, weil entsprechende Zukunftsmodellierungen schon auf eine sehr lange Vergangenheit zurückblicken können, sondern weil sie mit ihrer Linearität keinerlei Alternativen zu offerieren scheinen.

Wir durchschauen diese pseudohistorisierenden Argumente problemlos – und scheinen doch nichts dagegen tun zu können. In einer erbarmungslos verzeitlichten Kultur lässt sich die eigene Bedeutsamkeit nur dadurch begründen, dass man zumindest behauptet, auf der imaginierten linearen Zeitleiste seine eigene, unverkennbare Kerbe hinterlassen zu haben. Vielleicht wäre es eine Möglichkeit, genau dieses Zeitmodell – auch und gerade mit Hilfe der historischen Wissenschaften – zu überdenken und zu verändern. Das wäre fraglos eine aufwändigere Angelegenheit. Sie dürfte auch nicht schnell und unproblematisch vonstattengehen. Aber es wäre eine Möglichkeit, um den Fragen nach Zeit und Geschichte einen anderen Stellenwert zukommen zu lassen, um sie nicht darauf zu reduzieren, für eine Identitätsbildung zu sorgen, die doch immer wieder in Frage gestellt werden muss, sondern um der Temporalität von Menschen und Kulturen in ihrer Komplexität Raum zu geben – und um dann vielleicht auch für ein anderes politisches Selbstverständnis zu sorgen, das nicht permanent damit beschäftigt sein muss, neue Zeiten und Epochen auszurufen. Dann ließen sich auch Koalitionsverträge floskelmäßig entrümpeln.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Elias, Norbert. Über die Zeit. Arbeiten zur Wissenssoziologie II. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 1988.
  • Nassehi, Armin. Die Zeit der Gesellschaft. Auf dem Weg zu einer soziologischen Theorie der Zeit. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, 2008.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Marc Reichwein, “Magisch einlullende Verben. Was taugt der GroKo-Vertrag als Literatur?,” www.welt.de/Magisch-einlullende-Verben-Was-taugt-der-GroKo-Vertrag-als-Literatur (letzter Zugriff 8.3.2018).
[2] Karl Heinz Bohrer, Ekstasen der Zeit. Augenblick, Gegenwart, Erinnerung (München/Wien: Hanser, 2003), 10.
[3] Elena, Esposito, Die Verbindlichkeit des Vorübergehenden. Paradoxien der Mode (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2004).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Unterzeichnung des Koalitionsvertrages der 19. Wahlperiode des Bundestages: Olaf Scholz, Angela Merkel, Horst Seehofer © Sandro Halank, 12.3.2018, CC BY-SA 3.0, www.wikimedia.org/Unterzeichnung_des_Koalitionsvertrages_by_Sandro_Halank (letzter Zugriff 15.3.2018).

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Landwehr, Achim: Zeit und Geschichte (in) der Großen Koalition. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 14, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11531

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi


Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 14
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11531

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest