Photographs and Occupied Cities

Fotografien und besetzte Städte | Photographies et villes occupées


Historical photos are a favoured instrument of Public Historians, especially in the context of exhibitions. They evoke emotions and create narrative dimensions in a broad audience. However, the meaning of the photo, by itself, often differs from its significance in a historical context and even more from the impression received by the lay viewer. Do we need to separate the image from its initial impression to give it meaning in the present?

The Shock of Images

In 2015, the photographers Carlos Spottorno and Guillermo Abril won the World Press Photo Award for their reportage At the gates of Europe, devoted to refugees. The two men collected some 25,000 shots that they used to make a comic strip/ graphic novel, based on photographs, to overcome ‘the shock of images’, the overwhelming surprise of the first impression. In the newspaper Le Soir, Carlos Spottorno justified his approach in these terms: “I was looking for a language allowing me to add a narrative dimension that does not exist in the photo taken in an isolated way. I wanted to leave the iconic image to be able to go into the real world.”[1]

Experiencing Cities at War

I was challenged by these remarks. Is it necessary to divert the photo from its initial rendering to give it meaning? Is it necessary to overcome the shock of the image to give it meaning, and is a comic strip / graphic novel the best vector for it? More broadly, is it enough to multiply the number of photos in order to give them a narrative dimension? Today, more and more historians use photographic material in a public history perspective, increasingly convinced that it precisely allows the introduction of a narrative dimension and provides an entry point for the experience.

“Going into the real world” is, indeed, precisely the approach of the curators of the exhibition Stad in Oorlog, currently presented at the Archives of the City of Amsterdam. The exhibition and the accompanying catalogue allow us to discover the lives of the inhabitants of the Dutch capital during the Second World War.[2] The entire space offers us a visual history of Amsterdam at war. However, for the historians René Kok and Eric Somers, the photographs cannot relate the historical narrative by themselves. To give meaning, they must be integrated into a historical context: getting out of the image to gain a better understanding of the photo.

A Comparative Perspective

This interest in the image as a source for writing the history of the occupied cities is not unique to Amsterdam. Even though they are not concerted initiatives, historical productions have recently been devoted to Paris, Brussels and, today, Amsterdam.[3] Their common point: the use of photography to offer a visual history of the occupation. In 2008, the City of Paris organized an exhibition entitled Les Parisiens sous l’occupation, accompanied by a catalogue. The exhibition sparked some controversy, because the colour photographs presented were made by André Zucca, a photographer accredited with the Propaganda Staffel. For some visitors, the colour created an impression of lightness, enhanced by the choice of themes addressed, or even by the single idea to evoke the war in colour. In 2009, a book was devoted to Brussels: “City at War”. A triple preoccupation formed its basis: proposing a public history project on the basis of a source familiar to the public, demonstrating its potentialities and limitations, and seeing how the use of photography can transform our perception of the city at war.

More than 70 years after the events, these initiatives are very successful. They also reveal the richness of the photographic material too long ignored by historians. The Belgian and Dutch examples also prove by how much the available corpus exceeds that of propaganda photographs. Contrary to popular belief, photography was by no means a prohibited practice, as long as pictures of the military infrastructure were not taken.

Historians and Photographs

Why did we have to wait until the beginning of the 21st century to see these initiatives multiply?[4] For a long time, photography has only been used for illustration. In the various projects mentioned here, it becomes a source of its own and even the source par excellence. Even where it does not offer the grids of understanding, photography proposes at least a certain representation of the city and its inhabitants confronted with the reality of the occupation. The image gives an additional meaning. The audience is confronted with “their” city at war. In these public history projects , the objective is also to propose a critical approach to the photographic support: what does it show us? What do we know about the person who took the shot and those who are photographed? What is the historical context of these photographs? Taking photographs in wartime is an approach that integrates multiple facets. For each of the occupied capitals, many propaganda pictures exist, because the impact of the image had not been lost on the occupiers or their collaborators. For the most part, these depictions were clichés that contemporaries were confronted with.

Today, interest for the history from below is becoming a trend. Is it possible to depict a history of daily life during war by using photography? Does it allow us to represent violence and oppression? After having been neglected, would the fallacy be to think that it cannot offer us a comprehensive history?

Photographing Persecution

Is it possible to represent the persecutions to which the Jewish population was subjected? The Amsterdam exhibition and the accompanying catalogue go far beyond previous projects in their effort. The Dutch material is particularly rich. It offers a vision of a poorly documented facet of the other capital cities. The number and quality of the historical photos about the persecution of the Jews is simply impressive. Why did the inhabitants of Amsterdam take so many photos? Could this be seen as a form of solidarity, whereas the statistics tell us the reality of a country in which the percentage of exterminated Jews far exceeds those of Belgium and France?[5] The reality is more complex: some of these photographs are the work of a photographer working directly for the German occupiers who was a member of the main Dutch collaboration movement. The persecutions were, therefore, photographed by an anti-Semite. This information is full of meaning and is part of the necessary contextualization of the photographic source. Obviously, for visitors to the exhibition, this dimension is hardly taken into account.[6] Given the changed perspective of today’s audience, the images mainly transport negative emotions regarding persecution. In this case, the image is not only a representation of a reality but it also feeds an a posteriori construction.

These nuances, these elements of information, this contextualization, are inseparable from the legitimate use of photography in a public history project. It is, under these conditions, possible to “go beyond the shock of images”, to give them a real narrative dimension, to not divert them even more from what they are: a representation.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Gervereau, Laurent, Histoire du visual au XXe siècle (Paris: Le Seuil, 2000).
  • Kesteloot, Chantal, Bruxelles sous l’occupation 1940-1944 (Bruxelles: Luc Pire/CegeSoma, 2009).
  • Kok, René and Eric Somers, Stad in Oorlog. Amsterdam 1940-1945 in foto’s (Amsterdam: WBooks/Niod, 2017).

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] http://plus.lesoir.be/90151/article/2017-04-15/25000-photos-pour-raconter-la-crise-migratoire-aux-frontieres-de-lunion (last accessed 8 May 2017).
[2] René Kok and Eric Somers, Stad in Oorlog. Amsterdam 1940-1945 in foto’s (Amsterdam: WBooks/Niod, 2017).
[3] Jean Pierre Azéma, Les Parisiens sous l’occupation. Photographies en couleur d’André Zucca (Paris: Gallimard, 2008). Chantal Kesteloot, Bruxelles sous l’occupation 1940-1944 (Bruxelles: Luc Pire/CegeSoma, 2009).
[4] Similar initiatives devoted to the First World War were initiated in the form of publications and Internet websites. See Manon Pignot, Paris dans la Grande Guerre 1914-1918 (Paris: Parigramme/Compagnie parisienne du livre, 2014). André Gunthert, Paris 14-18. La guerre au quotidien. Photographies de Charles Lansiaux, Paris (Paris: Bibliothèques, 2014). Bruno Benvindo and Chantal Kesteloot, Bruxelles, ville occupée, 1914-1918, (Waterloo: La Renaissance du Livre/CegeSoma, 2016). Mélanie Bost and Alain Colignon, La Wallonie dans la Grande Guerre, 1914-1918, (Waterloo: La Renaissance du Livre/CegeSoma, 2016). Online: http://history.2014-18brussels.be/fr and http://www.14-18.bruxelles.be/index.php/fr/ (last accessed 8 May 2017).
[5] Pim Griffioen and Ron Zeller, “Anti-Jewish Policy and Organization of the Deportations in France and the Netherlands, 1940-1944: A Comparative Study.” Holocaust and Genocide Studies 20 (2006): 437-473.
[6]It is difficult to know how the visitors react. On the basis of the guestbook (consultation 1 april 2017), no comments on the identity of the photographers or the origin of the photos were recorded, but only on the emotion and pedagogical and moral virtue of the photo.

_____________________

Image Credits
Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-L23001 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, Bundesarchiv Bild 183-L23001, Amsterdam, Durchmarsch deutscher Truppen, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE

Recommended Citation
Kesteloot, Chantal: Photographs and Occupied Cities. In: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 18, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9243.

Editorial Responsibility
Moritz HoffmannMarko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Fotografische Darstellungen von Geschichte sind bevorzugte Instrumente von Public Historians, besonders im Kontext von Ausstellungen. Sie rufen Emotionen hervor und erzeugen narrative Dimensionen in einem breiten Publikum. Allerdings unterscheidet sich die Bedeutung eines Fotos an sich oft sehr von seinem Stellenwert im historischen Kontext und noch mehr von der Rezeption des Laien, der es betrachtet. Müssen wir das Abbild von seinem ersten Eindruck trennen, um ihm Bedeutung in der Gegenwart zu geben?

Der Schreck der Bilder

Im Jahr 2015 gewannen die Fotografen Carlos Spottorno und Guillermo Abril den World Press Photo Award für ihre Reportage At The Gates of Europe, die Flüchtenden gewidmet war. Beide sammelten ca. 25’000 Aufnahmen und erstellten mit ihnen einen Comic bzw. eine Graphic Novel, das auf Fotos basierte, um den “Schreck der Bilder”, die überwältigende Überraschung des ersten Eindrucks, zu überwinden. In der Zeitung Le Soir rechtfertigte Carlos Spottorno sein Vorgehen mit den Worten: “Ich suchte nach einer Sprache, die es mir erlaubte, eine narrative Dimension hinzu zu fügen, welche in dem isoliert aufgenommenen Foto nicht existiert. Ich wollte das Ikonische des Bildes verlassen, um in die echte Welt eintreten zu können.”[1]

Städte im Krieg erleben

Diese Bemerkungen haben mich herausgefordert. Muss das Foto von seiner ursprünglichen Darstellung weggeführt werden, um ihm Bedeutung zu geben? Ist es notwendig, den Schreck des Bildes zu überwinden, um ihm Bedeutung zu geben und ist ein Comic bzw. eine Graphic Novel der beste Träger hierfür? Reicht es aus, die Anzahl der Fotografien zu multiplizieren, um ihnen eine narrative Dimension zu geben? Heute benutzt eine wachsende Anzahl von HistorikerInnen fotografisches Material aus einer Public-History-Perspektive, zunehmend davon überzeugt, dass eben genau das die Einführung einer narrativen Dimension ermöglicht und einen unmittelbaren Erfahrungszugang anbietet.

“In die echte Welt gehen” ist genau der Zugang der Kuratoren der Ausstellung Stad in Oorlog, die zurzeit im Archiv der Stadt Amsterdam präsentiert wird. Die Ausstellung und der Begleitkatalog erlauben es uns, das Leben der BewohnerInnen der niederländischen Hauptstadt während des Zweiten Weltkriegs zu entdecken.[2] Der gesamte Raum bietet uns eine optische Geschichte von Amsterdam im Krieg. Allerdings können nach Meinung der Historiker René Kok und Eric Somers die Fotos alleine nicht das historische Narrativ wiedergeben. Um Bedeutung zu vermitteln, müssen sie in einen historischen Kontext integriert werden: Das Abbild muss verlassen werden, um ein besseres Verständnis des Fotos zu erreichen.

Eine vergleichende Perspektive

Dieses Interesse am Bild als einer Quelle für die Geschichtsdarstellung besetzter Städte ist nicht beschränkt auf Amsterdam. Auch wenn die Initiativen nicht untereinander abgestimmt sind, wurden historische Ausstellungsprojekte in jüngster Zeit den Städten Paris, Brüssel und derzeit Amsterdam gewidmet.[3] Ihnen gemeinsam ist die Verwendung von Fotografie, um eine visuelle Geschichte der Besatzung zu erzeugen. 2008 organisierte die Stadt Paris eine Ausstellung mit dem Namen Les Parisiens sous l’occupation, zu der auch ein Katalog erschien. Die Ausstellung entfachte eine Kontroverse, weil die dort ausgestellten Farbfotos von André Zucca stammten, einem Fotografen mit Akkreditierung der Propagandastaffel. Bei manchen BesucherInnen erzeugte die Farbigkeit einen Eindruck von Leichtigkeit, verstärkt durch die thematische Auswahl oder schlicht die Idee, den Zweiten Weltkrieg farbig darzustellen. 2009 widmete sich das Buch “City at War” der Stadt Brüssel. Eine dreifache Vorüberlegung bestimmte seinen Ausgangspunkt: ein Public History-Projekt anzubieten, das auf dem Publikum bekannten Quellen basiert, seine Möglichkeiten und Einschränkungen zu demonstrieren, und schließlich zu sehen, wie die Verwendung von Fotografien unsere Wahrnehmung der Stadt im Krieg transformieren kann.

Mehr als 70 Jahre nach den Ereignissen sind diese Projekte sehr erfolgreich. Sie offenbaren auch die Reichhaltigkeit des fotografischen Materials, das viel zu lange von HistorikerInnen ignoriert wurde. Die belgischen und niederländischen Beispiele zeigen auch, um wie viel mehr der vorhandene Korpus den der Propagandafotos übersteigt. Entgegen der landläufigen Meinung war Fotografie keinesfalls eine verbotene Praxis, so lange keine Bilder der militärischen Infrastruktur gemacht wurden.

HistorikerInnen und Fotografien

Warum mussten wir bis zum Anfang des 21. Jahrhunderts warten, um die Vervielfachung solcher Initiativen zu sehen?[4] Über eine lange Zeit ist die Fotografie nur zum Zweck der Illustration benutzt worden. Bei den hier erwähnten Projekten ist sie eine eigenständige Quelle, sogar die Quelle par excellence geworden. Auch wo sie keine Verständnisraster anbietet, schlägt die Fotografie zumindest eine gewisse Vorstellung einer Stadt und ihrer BewohnerInnen vor, die mit der Realität der Besetzung konfrontiert sind. Das Bild liefert eine zusätzliche Bedeutung. Die ZuschauerInnen werden mit “ihrer” Stadt im Krieg konfrontiert. Bei diesen Projekten ist ein Ziel auch, einen kritischen Zugang zur fotografischen Unterstützung zu finden: Was zeigt sie uns? Was wissen wir über die Person, welche die Aufnahme machte und über die abgebildeten Personen? Was ist der historische Kontext dieser Fotos? Fotos in Kriegszeiten zu machen ist ein Vorgehen, das mehrere Facetten integriert. Für jede der besetzten Städte existiert eine Vielzahl von Propagandabildern, weil die Wirkung des Bildes den Besatzern oder ihren Kollaborateuren nicht verborgen geblieben war. Diese waren hauptsächlich Klischees, mit denen ZeitgenossInnen konfrontiert wurden.

Heute entwickelt sich zunehmend ein Interesse für die Geschichte von unten. Ist es möglich, eine Geschichte des täglichen Lebens im Krieg durch die Verwendung von Fotografie aufzuzeichnen? Erlaubt sie es uns, Gewalt und Unterdrückung darzustellen? Wäre es nach ihrer langen Vernachlässigung ein Trugschluss zu denken, dass sie uns eine umfassende Geschichte nicht anbieten kann?

Verfolgung fotografieren

Ist es möglich, die Verfolgungen von Jüdinnen und Juden fotografisch darzustellen? Die Amsterdamer Ausstellung und ihr Begleitkatalog gehen in dieser Hinsicht viel weiter als frühere Projekte. Das niederländische Material ist besonders reichhaltig. Es bietet ein Bild einer schlecht dokumentierten Facette anderer Hauptstädte. Die Anzahl und Qualität der Fotos von der Verfolgung der Jüdinnen und Juden ist beeindruckend. Warum machten die EinwohnerInnen Amsterdams so viele Fotos? Könnte dies als eine Art Solidarität angesehen werden, obwohl die Statistik uns die Realität eines Landes erzählt, in dem der Prozentsatz der ermordeten Jüdinnen und Juden viel höher als in Belgien oder Frankreich liegt?[5] Die Realität ist komplexer: Manche Fotos sind das Werk eines Fotografen, der unmittelbar für die deutschen BesatzerInnen arbeitete und Mitglied der größten niederländischen Kollaborateurbewegung war. Die Verfolgungen waren daher von einem Antisemiten selbst fotografiert worden. Diese Information ist bedeutungsvoll und Teil der notwendigen Kontextualisierung der fotografischen Quelle. Für die BesucherInnen der Ausstellung fällt diese Dimension jedoch eindeutig kaum ins Gewicht.[6] Angesichts der veränderten Perspektive des heutigen Publikums transportieren die Bilder hauptsächlich negative Emotionen in Bezug auf Verfolgung. In diesem Fall ist das Bild nicht nur eine Darstellung einer Realität, sondern es nährt auch eine Konstruktion a posteriori.

Diese Nuancen, diese informationellen Elemente, diese Kontextualisierung sind nicht von der legitimen Verwendung der Fotografie in einem Projekt zur Public History zu trennen. Es ist unter diesen Bedingungen möglich, jenseits des ‘Schreckens der Bilder’ zu gehen, ihnen eine echte narrative Dimension zu geben, sie nicht noch weiter von dem zu entfernen, was sie sind: eine Darstellung.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Laurent Gervereau: Histoire du visual au XXe siècle. Paris 2000.
  • Chantal Kesteloot: Bruxelles sous l’occupation 1940-1944. Bruxelles 2009.
  • René Kok/Eric Somers: Stad in Oorlog. Amsterdam 1940-1945 in foto’s. Amsterdam 2017.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] http://plus.lesoir.be/90151/article/2017-04-15/25000-photos-pour-raconter-la-crise-migratoire-aux-frontieres-de-lunion (letzter Zugriff 8.5.2017).
[2] René Kok/Eric Somers: Stad in Oorlog. Amsterdam 1940-1945 in foto’s. Amsterdam 2017.
[3] Jean Pierre Azéma: Les Parisiens sous l’occupation. Photographies en couleur d’André Zucca. Paris 2008. Chantal Kesteloot: Bruxelles sous l’occupation 1940-1944. Brüssel 2009.
[4] Ähnliche Initiative in Bezug auf den Ersten Weltkrieg wurden in Form von Veröffentlichungen und Internetseiten ins Leben gerufen, siehe Manon Pignot: Paris dans la Grande Guerre 1914-1918. Paris 2014, André Gunthert: Paris 14-18. La guerre au quotidien. Photographies de Charles Lansiaux, Paris. Paris 2014, Bruno Benvindo/Chantal Kesteloot: Bruxelles, ville occupée, 1914-1918. Waterloo 2016, Mélanie Bost/Alain Colignon: La Wallonie dans la Grande Guerre, 1914-1918. Waterloo 2016. Online: http://history.2014-18brussels.be/fr und http://www.14-18.bruxelles.be/index.php/fr/ (letzter Zugriff 8.5.2017).
[5] Pim Griffioen/Ron Zeller: Anti-Jewish Policy and Organization of the Deportations in France and the Netherlands, 1940-1944: A Comparative Study. In: Holocaust and Genocide Studies 20 (2006), S. 437-473.
[6] Es ist schwer, Reaktionen von BesucherInnen zu evaluieren. Anhand des Gästebuchs (eingesehen am 1.4.2017) wurden keine Kommentare zur Identität der Fotografen oder zum Ursprung der Fotos notiert, sondern nur über Emotionen und den pädagogischen und moralischen Wert des Bilds.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-L23001 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, Bundesarchiv Bild 183-L23001, Amsterdam, Durchmarsch deutscher Truppen, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Kesteloot, Chantal: Fotografien und besetzte Städte. In: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 18, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9243.

Translated by Jana Kaiser (kaiser /at/ academic-texts. de)

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Moritz HoffmannMarko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Les représentations photographiques de la guerre sont parmi les instruments favoris des historiens publics, en particulier lorsqu’il s’agit de les mettre en scène dans le cadre d’expositions. Les émotions qu’elles suscitent et les fils narratifs qu’elles tissent permettent de toucher un large public. Néanmoins, leur signification réelle diffère souvent de la réalité du contexte historique abordé et plus encore de l’impression qu’elles suscitent auprès de tout un chacun. Devons-nous dissocier l’image de son impression initiale pour parvenir à lui donner un sens aujourd’hui ?

Le Choc des Images

En 2015, les photographes Carlos Spottorno et Guillermo Abril remportaient le World Press Photo pour leur reportage Aux portes de l’Europe consacré aux réfugiés. Les deux hommes ont réuni quelque 25.000 clichés qu’ils ont utilisés pour en créer une bande dessinée composée de photos pour dépasser “le choc des images”. Dans le journal Le Soir, Carlos Spottorno justifie sa démarche en ces termes : “Je cherchais un langage me permettant d’apporter une dimension narrative qui n’existe pas dans la photo prise isolément. Je voulais sortir de l’image iconique pour pouvoir aller dans le vécu”.[1]

Dans le vécu des villes en guerre

Ces propos m’ont interpellée. Faut-il détourner la photo de son rendu initial pour lui donner sens ? Faut-il dépasser le choc de l’image pour lui donner sens et pour ce faire la bande dessinée est-elle le meilleur vecteur ? Plus largement, suffit-il de multiplier le nombre de photos pour leur donner une dimension narrative ? Aujourd’hui, de plus en plus d’historiens utilisent le matériau photographique dans une perspective d’histoire publique, de plus en plus persuadés qu’il permet précisément d’introduire une dimension narrative et d’aller dans le vécu.

“Aller dans le vécu”, telle est en effet la démarche des concepteurs de l’exposition Stad in Oorlog présentées actuellement aux Archives de la ville d’Amsterdam. L’exposition et le catalogue qui l’accompagne nous proposent de découvrir le vécu des habitants de la capitale néerlandaise durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale.[2] L’ensemble nous offre une histoire visuelle d’Amsterdam en guerre. Certes, pour les historiens René Kok et Eric Somers, les photos ne peuvent relater par elles-mêmes le récit historique. Pour leur donner sens, elles se doivent d’être placées dans un contexte historique. Sortir de l’image pour mieux y revenir en quelque sorte.

Une perspective comparée

Cet intérêt pour l’image comme source pour écrire l’histoire des villes occupées n’est pas isolée. Même s’il ne s’agit en rien d’initiatives concertées, des ouvrages historiques ont récemment été consacrés à Paris, à Bruxelles et, aujourd’hui à Amsterdam.[3] Leur point commun : l’utilisation de la photographie pour proposer une histoire visuelle de l’occupation. En 2008, la Ville de Paris organisait une exposition intitulée Les Parisiens sous l’occupation, accompagnée d’un catalogue. L’exposition a certes provoqué quelques polémiques parce que les photographies couleurs présentées étaient l’œuvre d’André Zucca, un photographe accrédité auprès de la Propaganda Staffel. Pour certains visiteurs, la couleur créait une impression de légèreté encore accrue par le choix des thématiques abordées voire par la seule idée même d’évoquer la guerre en couleurs. En 2009, un ouvrage était consacré à Bruxelles, ville en guerre. A la base, une triple préoccupation : proposer un projet d’histoire publique sur base d’une source familière pour le public, en montrer les potentialités et les limites et poser la question de voir en quoi l’utilisation de la photographie peut transformer notre perception de la ville en guerre.

Plus de 70 ans après les faits, toutes ces initiatives suscitent un large intérêt. Elles révèlent aussi la richesse d’un matériau photographique trop longtemps ignoré par les historiens. Les exemples belge et néerlandais nous prouvent en outre combien le corpus disponible dépasse largement les photographies de propagande. Contrairement à une idée reçue, photographier n’était nullement une pratique interdite dès lors que l’on s’abstenait de prendre des clichés des infrastructures militaires.

Historiens et photographies

Pourquoi a-t-il dès lors fallu attendre le début du 21e siècle pour voir se multiplier ces initiatives?[4] Longtemps, la photographie a uniquement été utilisée comme illustration, tendancieuse par essence. Dans les différents projets épinglés ici, elle devient source à part entière et même la source par excellence. Si elle n’offre pas les grilles de compréhension, la photo propose une certaine représentation de la ville et de ses habitants confrontés à la réalité de l’occupation. L’image donne un sens supplémentaire. Le lecteur du catalogue, le visiteur de l’exposition est confronté à “sa” ville en guerre. Par ces projets d’histoire publique, l’objectif est également de proposer une approche critique du support photographique : que nous montre-t-il ? Que sait-on de celui ou de celle qui a pris le cliché et de ceux photographiés ? Quel est le contexte historique dans lequel s’inscrivent ces photographies? Photographier en temps de guerre est une démarche qui intègre de multiples facettes. Pour chacune des capitales occupées, on dispose d’innombrables photos de propagande. Sans surprise, l’impact de l’image n’avait échappé ni à l’occupant, ni aux groupes de collaboration. Pour la plupart, ce sont des clichés auxquels étaient confrontés les contemporains.

Aujourd’hui, l’intérêt se porte sur une histoire d’en bas. Est-il possible de proposer une histoire du quotidien de guerre en recourant à la photographie ? Celle-ci permet-elle de représenter la violence, l’oppression ? Après avoir longtemps négligé la photo, le piège ne serait-il pas de penser qu’elle peut nous proposer une histoire totale ?

Photographier les persécutions

Est-il possible de représenter les persécutions à l’encontre des Juifs ? Difficile de répondre à cette question mais l’exposition d’Amsterdam et le catalogue qui l’accompagnent dépassent largement les projets antérieurs. Le matériau néerlandais s’avère particulièrement riche. Il offre un rendu de facettes peu documentées pour les autres capitales. Le nombre et la qualité des clichés portant sur la persécution des Juifs est tout simplement impressionnant. Pourquoi les Amstellodamois ont-ils pris tant de clichés ? Pourrait-on considérer qu’il s’agit là d’une forme de solidarité alors que la réalité statistique nous renvoie la réalité d’un pays où le pourcentage de Juifs exterminés dépasse de loin ceux de la Belgique et de la France?[5] La réalité est plus complexe : une partie des photos est l’œuvre d’un photographe travaillant directement pour l’occupant et d’un membre du principal mouvement néerlandais de collaboration. Les persécutions sont donc photographiées par des antisémites patentés. Cette information a tout son sens et s’inscrit dans la nécessaire contextualisation de la source photographique. Evidemment, pour les visiteurs de l’exposition, cette dimension n’est guère prise en compte.[6] Etant donné la perception actuelle, ces images sont généralement chargées d’émotions négatives dès lors qu’elles concernent les persécutions. Dans ce cas, l’image est non seulement représentation d’une réalité mais en nourrit également une construction a posteriori.

Ces nuances, ces éléments d’information, cette contextualisation sont indissociables de l’utilisation légitime de la photographie dans un projet d’histoire publique. C’est, à nos yeux, à ces conditions, qu’il est possible de dépasser “le choc des images”, de leur apporter une véritable dimension narrative, ne pas les détourner plus encore de ce qu’elles sont : une représentation.

_____________________

Littérature

  • Laurent Gervereau: Histoire du visual au XXe siècle. Paris 2000.
  • Chantal Kesteloot: Bruxelles sous l’occupation 1940-1944. Bruxelles 2009.
  • René Kok/Eric Somers: Stad in Oorlog. Amsterdam 1940-1945 in foto’s. Amsterdam 2017.

Liens externes

_____________________

[1] http://plus.lesoir.be/90151/article/2017-04-15/25000-photos-pour-raconter-la-crise-migratoire-aux-frontieres-de-lunion (Consulté pour la dernière fois le 8.5.2017).
[2] René Kok/Eric Somers: Stad in Oorlog. Amsterdam 1940-1945 in foto’s. Amsterdam 2017.
[3] Jean Pierre Azéma: Les Parisiens sous l’occupation. Photographies en couleur d’André Zucca. Paris 2008. Chantal Kesteloot: Bruxelles sous l’occupation 1940-1944. Brüssel 2009.
[4] Des initiatives similaires ont vu le jour concernant la Première Guerre mondiale à la fois sous forme de publications et de site Internet. Voir Manon Pignot: Paris dans la Grande Guerre 1914-1918. Paris 2014, André Gunthert: Paris 14-18. La guerre au quotidien. Photographies de Charles Lansiaux, Paris. Paris 2014, Bruno Benvindo/Chantal Kesteloot: Bruxelles, ville occupée, 1914-1918. Waterloo 2016, Mélanie Bost/Alain Colignon: La Wallonie dans la Grande Guerre, 1914-1918. Waterloo 2016. Online: http://history.2014-18brussels.be/fr et http://www.14-18.bruxelles.be/index.php/fr/ (Consulté pour la dernière fois le 8.5.2017).
[5] Pim Griffioen/Ron Zeller: Anti-Jewish Policy and Organization of the Deportations in France and the Netherlands, 1940-1944: A Comparative Study. In: Holocaust and Genocide Studies 20 (2006), p. 437-473.
[6] Difficile de savoir comment réagit le visiteur. Sur base du livre d’or (consultation le 1/4/2017), aucun commentaire sur l’identité des photographes ou la provenance des photos mais uniquement sur l’émotion et la vertu pédagogique et morale de la photo.

_____________________

Crédits illustration

Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-L23001 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, Bundesarchiv Bild 183-L23001, Amsterdam, Durchmarsch deutscher Truppen, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE

Citation recommandée

Kesteloot, Chantal: Photographies et villes occupées. Dans: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 18, DOI: .

Responsabilité éditoriale
Moritz HoffmannMarko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 5 (2017) 18
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9243

Tags: , , , ,

Pin It on Pinterest