App-based Holocaust Education: The Mauthausen IWalk

App-basierte Holocaust Education: der Mauthausen-IWalk

Abstract:
The process of digital transformation has changed how the history of National Socialism and the Holocaust can be taught and learned in schools and out-of-school educational contexts. This article presents the possibilities for digital place-related history education, on the example of the IWalk tours developed for the Mauthausen memorial site. With the help of these interactive platforms, the visitors can learn about Mauthausen’s past as a site of a concentration camp, but also about its post-war history and its commemorative role in the present.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19616
Languages: English, German


Digital and place-related learning are two characteristic aspects of the current pedagogical-didactic discourse in the field of Holocaust education. Recently, several new educational offerings have emerged, such as the USC Shoah Foundation’s IWalk app. The interactive app makes it possible, at the original historical site, to stage on-site tours or virtual eyewitness accounts and thus to direct the attention of the visitors to inconspicuous objects on the scene which are otherwise easily overlooked.

New Mediation Opportunities

The question of how the history of National Socialism and the Holocaust can be successfully conveyed in school and out-of-school educational work has been characterized in recent years by the rapidly advancing digital transformation. Likewise, place-related learning and out-of-school learning sites have become more important: here the focus was on concentration camp memorials. However, educational trips or excursions respectively are far from feasible for all school classes. Great potential for historical learning is also offered by other regional and local places (“near-places”), and learning processes can also be initiated at/in virtual places or spaces, respectively.

For the representation and remembrance of crimes of violence of National Socialism and its victims, these developments have opened up new opportunities, which, at the same time, include challenges and fields of tension. Against this background, and the learning habits, learning settings and teaching practices not only changing during the pandemic, several educational offerings have recently emerged which take these developments into account and increasingly link digital tools to historical contexts, places and biographies. _erinnern.at_[1] has pioneered the development of digital learning materials based on eyewitness interviews in the German-speaking area and is now demonstrating with the first IWalks for Austria how place-related, media-supported and interview-based learning can take place in virtual space and directly on site, at original historical locations.[2]

IWitness and IWalks of the USC Shoah Foundation

IWalks illustrate and convey history(s) in the local environment and through the individual narratives of contemporary witnesses. History thus becomes personal, concrete and comprehensible and can be transferred to current developments and issues. The place-based, digital, interactive educational tool IWalk combines eyewitness accounts specifically from the Visual History Archive with further primary sources such as maps and photographs. Presented in 2019 as a new learning offering from the USC Shoah Foundation, the app now makes available dozens of tours in 13 countries (in Europe, in Canada, and in the United States) and in many languages. Pupils, students, teachers and other visitors can learn about aspects of the history of the Holocaust at original historical sites and engage with the memory of it.

As pedagogical objectives the USC Shoah Foundation has defined, among others things, mediation of history at the concrete location, linking of macro- and micro-history, strengthening of personal references (subjectivity and reflection) and multi-perspective approaches. Active and participative learning, guided, but nevertheless independent exploration and learning of contents, practice in dealing with audiovisual eyewitness accounts and other sources are essential objectives. Reflection questions are at the heart of the learning tasks: “Prequestions” orient the participants and ask them to connect with the site and the topics being discussed. “Postquestions” reflect the sources and the topics which the participants have dealt with. IWalks can be linked to the IWitness platform – here the answers of the students can be viewed by teachers. The IWitness learning website provides student activities and classroom support using eyewitness videos from the USC Visual History Archives, which is one of the largest digital video archives in the world with over 55,000 video interviews with survivors of the Holocaust and other genocides.

“Mauthausen Memorial: Traces of a Crime”

The first IWalk in Austria “Mauthausen Memorial. Traces of a Crime”, meanwhile published in the app, is a cooperation project of _erinnern.at_ of the USC Shoah Foundation and the Mauthausen Concentration Camp Memorial. The virtual tour enables historical learning about the history of the Mauthausen concentration camp on site or at a distance for students and other interested people. It directs the gaze of the visitors to objects on site that can easily be overlooked. The starting point of each of the six stations is an inconspicuous object: a memorial plaque, a stone bench, gravestones, a chimney. Video interviews with contemporary witnesses and image sources tie in with the objects and give users a glimpse into the past.

For school classes, the IWalk with its additional source material and reflection questions is an ideal complement to already existing educational offerings of the Mauthausen Concentration Camp Memorial, e.g. after a tour. For visitors who are familiar with the memorial and the Mauthausen audio guide, the video interviews and reflection questions provide an opportunity to explore “new” stories or unknown places at the memorial.

The IWalk “Mauthausen Memorial” invites to think not only about the past, but also about the post-war period and today’s forms of commemoration and perceptions of the future. The site has functioned as a memorial since 1949, and over the years the site has changed, as the background text for the last stop of the tour explains: “Buildings were torn down; monuments erected. Today, this is a historic site, a former crime scene, a relic of the past, physical evidence, a cemetery, a museum, a place of employment, a place of learning, and a tourist destination.” If the prerequisites which make a memorial or a place of remembrance a place of learning are defined by, among other things, the necessity of addressee orientation, self-activity and multi-perspectivity, approaches of exploratory project work and of exemplary learning, the historicization of the crime scene as well as the thematization of its post-event history and its current significance,[3] then the IWalk Mauthausen can certainly be described as such a place of learning – visited in reality or virtually.

Memories of Contemporary Witnesses 

Two more IWalks will be presented in Austria in 2022: one tour is dedicated to Jewish life in Vienna before the Shoah and shows the diversity of Jewish – religious, secular, cultural – lifeworlds and institutions in the 2nd district. The IWalk “Jewish Resistance in National Socialist Vienna” leads to five sites in Vienna’s 1st and 2nd districts which stand for acts of resistance by Jews in Vienna during the Nazi era. It explores the scopes of action of individuals and makes moments of resistance visible.[4] Historian and cultural mediator Sarah von Holt, who designed the IWalk on Jewish Resistance, explains why the educational tool is especially suitable for teaching in schools:

“IWalks set the focus on digital usage habits of a young generation as well as the local historical discussion of the Nazi era. They illustrate that resistance, exclusion and expulsion as well as perpetration here on site in Vienna are manifested in the experiences and actions of individuals. At the center of the app are memories of contemporary witnesses whose experiences during the Nazi era are linked to the places visited in the city. Getting to know people whose lives took place in the streets of Vienna enables young people to relate to their own everyday world. In this way, they can set out together in search of historical traces – guided by questions – and discover what otherwise remains hidden behind well-known house facades.”

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Gautschi, Peter. “Umgang mit dem Thema ‛Holocaust’ im digitalisierten Unterricht.” In Erzählweisen des Sagbaren und Unsagbaren: Formen des Holocaust-Gedenkens in schweizerischen und transnationalen Perspektiven, edited by Maoz Azaryahu et al. Köln: Böhlau Verlag, 2021, 315-332.
  • Kumar, Victoria. “Die Vermittlung von Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust in der Bildung heute.” In Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust – Materialien, Zeitzeugen und Orte der Erinnerung in der schulischen Bildung, edited by Werner Dreier, Falk Pingel. Innsbruck: Studien Verlag, 2021, 37-45.
  • Szönyi, Andrea, Kori Street. “Videotaped Testimonies of Victims of National Socialism in Educational Programs: The Example of USC Shoah Foundation’s Online Platform IWitness.” In Explorations of Good Practice in Educational Work with Video Testimonies of Victims of National Socialism, edited by Werner Dreier, Angelika Laumer, and Moritz Wein. Berlin: Stiftung Erinnerung, Verantwortung und Zukunft, 2018, 266-279.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] _erinnern.at_ was founded in 2000 as an association and has been located in the OeAD – Austria’s Agency for Education and Internationalization since 2022 as a program for teaching and learning about National Socialism and the Holocaust. With headquarters in Bregenz, _erinnern.at_ advocates for Austrian remembrance education and its further development at an international, national as well as local level. Thereby the focus lies on the implementation of teacher training and the development of teaching materials on the topics of the Holocaust, National Socialism, anti-Semitism and racism. Website: www.erinnern.at.
[2] The IWalk app can be downloaded for free from the App Store/Play Store and is supported by Android and IOS.
[3] Habbo Knoch, Geschichte in Gedenkstätten. Theorie – Praxis – Berufsfelder (Public History – Geschichte in der Praxis) (Tübingen: UTB, 2020), 141.
[4] The first IWalk has also recently been published in Switzerland: On the occasion of the International Holocaust Remembrance Day on 27 January 2022, the Lucerne University of Teacher Education presented the IWalk “Jewish Lucerne 1933-1945”. – The IWalks in Austria and Switzerland are part of the trinational project “LEBENSGESCHICHTEN”: https://iwitness.usc.edu/sites/lebensgeschichten (last accessed 7 April 2022).

_____________________

Image Credits

The Mauthausen IWalk App © Mauthausen Concentration Camp Memorial, _erinnern.at_.

Recommended Citation

Kumar, Victoria: App-based Holocaust Education: The Mauthausen IWalk. In: Public History Weekly 10 (2022) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19616.

Translated by Kurt Brügger https://www.swissamericanlanguageexpert.ch/

Editorial Responsibility

Peter Gautschi / Moritz Hoffmann 

Digitales und ortsbezogenes Lernen sind zwei charakteristische Aspekte des aktuellen pädagogisch-didaktischen Diskurses in der Holocaust Education. Kürzlich sind mehrere neue Bildungsangebote entstanden, wie etwa die IWalk-App der USC Shoah Foundation: Die interaktive App ermöglicht es, am historischen Originalschauplatz Rundgänge vor Ort oder auch virtuell mit Zeitzeug:innen-Berichten zu inszenieren und dadurch die Aufmerksamkeit der Besucher:innen auch auf unscheinbare Objekte am Schauplatz zu richten, die sonst leicht übersehen werden.

Neue Vermittlungschancen

Die Frage, wie die Vermittlung der Geschichte des Nationalsozialismus und des Holocaust in der schulischen und außerschulischen Bildungsarbeit gelingen kann, ist seit den letzten Jahren gekennzeichnet durch die rasant vorangeschrittene digitale Transformation. Ebenfalls sind ortsbezogenes Lernen und außerschulische Lernorte wichtiger geworden: KZ-Gedenkstätten standen dabei im Fokus. Bildungsreisen bzw. Exkursionen sind jedoch weit nicht für alle Schulklassen realisierbar. Großes Potential für das historische Lernen bieten auch andere regionale und lokale Orte (“Nahorte”) an und Lernprozesse können ebenfalls an/in virtuellen Orten bzw. Räumen initiiert werden.

Für die Darstellung von und die Erinnerung an die nationalsozialistischen Gewaltverbrechen und seiner Opfer haben sich durch diese Entwicklungen neue Chancen eröffnet, die gleichzeitig Herausforderungen und Spannungsfelder beinhalten. Vor diesem Hintergrund und den sich nicht erst während der Pandemie verändernden Lerngewohnheiten, Lernsettings und Unterrichtspraktiken sind kürzlich mehrere Bildungsangebote entstanden, die diesen Entwicklungen Rechnung tragen und digitale Tools verstärkt mit historischen Kontexten, Orten und Biografien verknüpfen. _erinnern.at_[1] hat bei der Entwicklung von digitalen Lernmaterialien basierend auf Zeitzeug:innen-Interviews im deutschsprachigen Raum Pionierarbeit geleistet und zeigt nun mit ersten IWalks für Österreich, wie ortsbezogenes, mediengestütztes und interviewbasiertes Lernen im virtuellen Raum und direkt vor Ort, an historischen Original-Schauplätzen, stattfinden kann.[2]

IWitness und IWalks der USC Shoah Foundation

IWalks veranschaulichen und vermitteln Geschichte(n) im lokalen Umfeld und durch die individuellen Erzählungen von Zeitzeug:innen. Geschichte wird dadurch persönlich, konkret und nachvollziehbar und lässt sich auf gegenwärtige Entwicklungen und Fragen übertragen. Das ortsbezogene, digitale, interaktive Bildungstool IWalk kombiniert Zeitzeug:innen-Berichte speziell aus dem Visual History Archive mit weiteren Primärquellen wie etwa Karten und Fotografien. 2019 als neues Lernangebot der USC Shoah Foundation präsentiert, sind in der App mittlerweile dutzende Rundgänge in 13 Ländern (in Europa, in Kanada und der USA) und in vielen Sprachen verfügbar. Schüler:innen, Studierende, Lehrende und andere Besucher:innen können an historischen Originalschauplätzen über Aspekte der Geschichte des Holocaust lernen und sich mit der Erinnerung daran auseinandersetzen.

Als pädagogische Ziele hat die USC Shoah Foundation u.a. die Geschichtsvermittlung am konkreten Ort, die Verknüpfung von Makro- und Mikrogeschichte, die Stärkung persönlicher Bezüge (Subjektivität und Reflexion) und multiperspektivische Zugänge definiert. Aktives und partizipatives Lernen, geführtes, aber dennoch selbständiges Erkunden und Lernen von Inhalten, Übung im Umgang mit audiovisuellen Zeitzeug:innen-Berichten und anderen Quellen sind wesentliche Ziele. Reflexionsfragen stehen im Zentrum der Lernaufgaben: “Prequestions” orientieren die Teilnehmer:innen und fordern sie auf, sich mit dem Ort und den behandelten Themen zu verbinden. “Postquestions” reflektieren die Quellen und die Themen, mit welchen sich die Teilnehmer:innen beschäftigt haben. IWalks können mit der Plattform IWitness verknüpft werden – hier sind die Antworten der Schüler:innen von Lehrenden einsehbar. Die Lernwebsite IWitness bietet Activities für Schüler:innen und Hilfestellungen für den Unterricht mit Zeitzeug:innen-Videos aus dem Bestand des USC-Visual History Archives, das mit über 55.000 Video-Interviews mit Überlebenden des Holocaust und anderen Genoziden eines der größten digitalen Videoarchive der Welt ist.

IWalk “Mauthausen Memorial: Spuren eines Verbrechens”

Der erste, mittlerweile in der App veröffentlichte IWalk in Österreich “Mauthausen Memorial. Spuren eines Verbrechens” ist ein Kooperationsprojekt von _erinnern.at_, der der USC Shoah Foundation und der KZ Gedenkstätte Mauthausen. Der virtuelle Rundgang ermöglicht Schüler:innen und anderen Interessierten ein historisches Lernen zur Geschichte des Konzentrationslagers Mauthausen vor Ort oder auf Distanz. Er richtet den Blick der Besuchenden auf Objekte vor Ort, die leicht übersehen werden können. Ausgangspunkt jeder der sechs Stationen ist ein unscheinbares Objekt: eine Gedenktafel, eine Steinbank, Grabsteine, ein Rauchfang. Video-Interviews mit Zeitzeug:innen sowie Bildquellen knüpfen an die Objekte an und eröffnen den Nutzenden einen Blick in die Vergangenheit.

Für Schulklassen ist der IWalk mit seinem zusätzlichen Quellenmaterial und Reflexionsfragen eine ideale Ergänzung zu bereits bestehenden Bildungsangeboten der KZ-Gedenkstätte Mauthausen, z.B. nach einem Rundgang. Für Besuchende, die mit der Gedenkstätte und dem Audio-Guide Mauthausen vertraut sind, bieten die Video-Interviews und Reflexions-Fragen eine Möglichkeit, “neue” Geschichten oder unbekannte Orte an der Gedenkstätte zu erkunden.

Der IWalk “Mauthausen Memorial” lädt dazu ein, nicht nur über die Vergangenheit, sondern auch über die Nachkriegszeit und heutige Formen des Gedenkens und Zukunftsvorstellungen nachzudenken. Seit 1949 fungiert der Ort als Gedenkstätte, über die Jahre hinweg hat sich der Ort verändert, wie der Hintergrund-Text zum letzten Stopp des Rundgangs erläutert: “Gebäude wurden abgerissen; Denkmäler errichtet. Heute ist dies ein historischer Ort, ein ehemaliger Tatort, ein Relikt der Vergangenheit, ein physischer Beweis, ein Friedhof, ein Museum, ein Arbeitsplatz, ein Lernort und ein Tourismusziel.” Werden die Voraussetzungen, die eine Gedenkstätte bzw. einen Erinnerungsort zu einem Lernort machen, u.a. mit der Notwendigkeit von Adressat:innenorientierung, Eigenaktivität und Multiperspektivität, Ansätzen der erkundenden Projektarbeit und des exemplarischen Lernens, der Historisierung des Tatorts sowie der Thematisierung seiner Nachgeschichte und seiner gegenwärtigen Bedeutung beschrieben,[3] so lässt sich auch der IWalk Mauthausen durchaus als solcher Lernort – real oder virtuell besucht – beschreiben.

Erinnerungen von Zeitzeug:innen im Zentrum

2022 werden zwei weitere IWalks in Österreich präsentiert: Ein Rundgang widmet sich dem Jüdischen Leben in Wien vor der Shoah und zeigt die Vielfalt jüdischer – religiöser, säkularer, kultureller – Lebenswelten und Institutionen im 2. Bezirk. Der IWalk “Jüdischer Widerstand im nationalsozialistischen Wien” führt an fünf Orte im 1. und 2. Wiener Gemeindebezirk, die für widerständige Handlungen von Jüdinnen und Juden in Wien während der NS-Zeit stehen. Er lotet Handlungsspielräume Einzelner aus und macht Momente der Gegenwehr sichtbar.[4] Die Historikerin und Kulturvermittlerin Sarah von Holt, die den IWalk zum Jüdischen Widerstand konzipiert hat, verdeutlicht, warum sich das Bildungstool speziell für die schulische Vermittlung eignet:

“IWalks legen den Fokus auf digitale Nutzungsgewohnheiten einer jungen Generation sowie eine lokalgeschichtliche Auseinandersetzung mit der NS-Zeit. Sie veranschaulichen, dass Widerstand, Ausgrenzung und Vertreibung als auch Täterschaft hier vor Ort in Wien in Erlebnissen und Handlungen Einzelner manifest wird. Im Zentrum der App stehen Erinnerungen von Zeitzeug:innen, deren Erfahrungen in der NS-Zeit mit den in der Stadt angesteuerten Orten verknüpft sind. Dass Kennenlernen von Menschen, deren Leben sich in den Straßen Wiens abspielten, ermöglicht Jugendliche einen Bezug zu ihrer eigenen Alltagswelt herzustellen. Sie können sich so gemeinsam forschend – angeleitet durch Fragen – auf die Suche nach historischen Spuren machen und entdecken, was ansonsten hinter altbekannten Häuserfassaden verborgen bleibt.”

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Gautschi, Peter. “Umgang mit dem Thema ‛Holocaust’ im digitalisierten Unterricht.” In Erzählweisen des Sagbaren und Unsagbaren: Formen des Holocaust-Gedenkens in schweizerischen und transnationalen Perspektiven, edited by Maoz Azaryahu et al. Köln: Böhlau Verlag, 2021, 315-332.
  • Kumar, Victoria. “Die Vermittlung von Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust in der Bildung heute.” In Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust – Materialien, Zeitzeugen und Orte der Erinnerung in der schulischen Bildung, edited by Werner Dreier, Falk Pingel. Innsbruck: Studien Verlag, 2021, 37-45.
  • Szönyi, Andrea, Kori Street. “Videotaped Testimonies of Victims of National Socialism in Educational Programs: The Example of USC Shoah Foundation’s Online Platform IWitness.” In Explorations of Good Practice in Educational Work with Video Testimonies of Victims of National Socialism, edited by Werner Dreier, Angelika Laumer, and Moritz Wein. Berlin: Stiftung Erinnerung, Verantwortung und Zukunft, 2018, 266-279.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] _erinnern.at_ wurde im Jahr 2000 als Verein gegründet und ist seit 2022 als Programm zum Lehren und Lernen über Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust im OeAD – Österreichs Agentur für Bildung und Internationalisierung angesiedelt. Mit Hauptsitz in Bregenz setzt sich _erinnern.at_ auf internationaler, nationaler sowie lokaler Ebene für die österreichische Erinnerungspädagogik und deren Weiterentwicklung ein. Schwerpunkte liegen dabei auf der Durchführung von Lehrer:innenfortbildungen und der Entwicklung von Unterrichtsmaterialien zu den Themen Holocaust, Nationalsozialismus, Antisemitismus sowie Rassismus. Website: www.erinnern.at (letzter Zugriff am 7. April 2022).
[2] Die IWalk-App kann kostenlos im App Store/Play Store heruntergeladen werden und wird von Android und IOS unterstützt.
[3] Habbo Knoch, Geschichte in Gedenkstätten. Theorie – Praxis – Berufsfelder (Public History – Geschichte in der Praxis) (Tübingen: UTB, 2020), 141.
[4] Auch in der Schweiz ist kürzlich der erste IWalk veröffentlicht worden: Anlässlich des Internationalen Holocaust-Gedenktages am 27.1.2022 präsentierte die Pädagogische Hochschule Luzern den IWalk “Das Jüdische Luzern 1933-1945”. – Die IWalks in Österreich und in der Schweiz sind Teil des trinationalen Projekts “LEBENSGESCHICHTEN”: https://iwitness.usc.edu/sites/lebensgeschichten (letzter Zugriff 11. April 2022).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

The Mauthausen IWalk App © Mauthausen Concentration Camp Memorial, _erinnern.at_.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Kumar, Victoria: App-based Holocaust Education: The Mauthausen IWalk. In: Public History Weekly 10 (2022) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19616.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Peter Gautschi / Moritz Hoffmann 

Copyright © 2021 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 10 (2022) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19616

Tags: , , , ,

3 replies »

  1. German version below. To all readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 22 languages. Just copy and paste.

    OPEN PEER REVIEW

    The Digital Mediation of History?

    Almost eight decades after the end of the Nazi era, the question arises as to how we want to deal with this part of our history in the future. The fact that digital formats, as Victoria Kumar describes them in her contribution, will play a central role for historical learning processes is certainly undeniable. But what exactly can it mean “after the end of contemporaneity”[1] to learn historically with regard to Nazi crimes and the Holocaust? And what is meant when there is repeated talk of “history mediation”?

    Jörn Rüsen already explicitly problematized the concept of mediation at the end of the 1980s and thus characterized history didactics not as a mediation science, but very succinctly as a “science of historical learning”.[2] In this way, it becomes clear that history is a construct and therefore not a matter of mere transmission of canonical stocks of knowledge or given historical patterns of interpretation, but rather of an independent engagement with the historical, that is, the question of what significance the Nazi era and the Holocaust can have for each and every one of us in the present and in the future – a question which must always be asked and answered anew. Against this background, it is very convincing that Victoria Kumar tries to profile historical learning not least as a participative and self- reflective process.

    At the same time, using the example of the IWalk “Mauthausen Memorial”, she points out that historical learning offerings today should no longer focus on first-order history (i.e. the Nazi past itself) only, but that it is at least as important to take into account how this period was dealt with after 1945 (second-order history).[3] Only then will it become clear that a critical engagement with National Socialist crimes, with perpetrators, accomplices and bystanders, could only establish itself very late in the face of considerable social resistance, and that today there are still or already again numerous voices that would prefer to end this critical engagement immediately.

    Certainly, Victoria Kumar is basically right when she draws attention to the great potentials of digital formats for historical learning. However, we know almost nothing about whether and to what extent these potentials are also realized. Christian Kuchler, for example, in his intensively received study on “Lernort Auschwitz” (Auschwitz as a place of learning) expressed himself rather cautiously in this regard.[4] Insofar, the future will not only be a matter of the further development of digital educational offerings, but also and especially of their empirical evaluation. Because, in the light of increasingly heterogeneous learning preconditions and rapidly changing political and historical-cultural framework conditions, historical learning today is undoubtedly more important, but probably also more uncertain than ever before.

    _____

    [1] Volkhard Knigge (ed.): Jenseits der Erinnerung – Verbrechensgeschichte begreifen. Impulse für die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nationalsozialismus nach dem Ende der Zeitgenossenschaft. Göttingen 2022.
    [2] Jörn Rüsen: Lebendige Geschichte. Grundzüge einer Historik III: Formen und Funktionen des historischen Wissens. Göttingen 1989, p. 84.
    [3] Cf. Holger Thünemann: Lernen aus der Geschichte? Überlegungen zur historischen Auseinandersetzung mit NS-Vergangenheit und Holocaust. In: Volkhard Knigge (ed.): Jenseits der Erinnerung – Verbrechensgeschichte begreifen. Impulse für die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nationalsozialismus nach dem Ende der Zeitgenossenschaft. Göttingen 2022, pp. 286-295, here p. 289.
    [4] Christian Kuchler: Lernort Auschwitz. Geschichte und Rezeption schulischer Gedenkstättenfahrten 1980–2019. Göttingen 2021, p. 210-230.

    __________

    French version below. To all readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 22 languages. Just copy and paste.

    OPEN PEER REVIEW

    Digitale Geschichtsvermittlung?

    Fast acht Jahrzehnte nach dem Ende der NS-Zeit stellt sich die Frage, wie wir in Zukunft mit diesem Teil unserer Geschichte umgehen wollen, eindringlicher denn je. Dass digitale Formate, wie Victoria Kumar sie in ihrem Beitrag beschreibt, für historische Lernprozesse eine zentrale Rolle spielen werden, ist sicher unbestreitbar. Aber was kann es „nach dem Ende der Zeitgenossenschaft“[1] eigentlich genau bedeuten, hinsichtlich NS-Verbrechen und Holocaust historisch zu lernen? Und was ist gemeint, wenn immer wieder von „Geschichtsvermittlung“ die Rede ist?

    Jörn Rüsen hat den Vermittlungsbegriff bereits Ende der 1980er Jahre nachdrücklich problematisiert und die Geschichtsdidaktik daher nicht als Vermittlungswissenschaft, sondern sehr prägnant als „Wissenschaft vom historischen Lernen“[2] charakterisiert. Auf diese Weise wird deutlich, dass Geschichte ein Konstrukt ist und dass es daher nicht um die Tradierung kanonischer Wissensbestände oder vorgegebener historischer Deutungsmuster geht, sondern um die eigenständige Auseinandersetzung mit Historischem, also um die immer wieder neu zu stellende und zu beantwortende Frage, welche Bedeutung NS-Zeit und Holocaust für jede(n) Einzelne(n) von uns in Gegenwart und Zukunft haben können. Vor diesem Hintergrund ist es sehr überzeugend, dass Victoria Kumar historisches Lernen nicht zuletzt als einen partizipativen und selbstreflexiven Prozess zu profilieren versucht.

    Zugleich weist sie am Beispiel des IWalk „Mauthausen Memorial“ darauf hin, dass historische Lernangebote sich heute nicht mehr darauf beschränken sollten, Geschichte erster Ordnung (also die NS-Vergangenheit selbst) zum Thema zu machen, sondern dass es mindestens ebenso wichtig ist, den Umgang mit dieser Zeit nach 1945 zu berücksichtigen (Geschichte zweiter Ordnung).[3] Nur dann wird klar, dass sich eine kritische Auseinandersetzung mit den nationalsozialistischen Verbrechen, mit Tätern, Mitläufern und Zuschauern, erst sehr spät gegen erhebliche gesellschaftliche Widerstände etablieren konnte und dass es heute immer noch bzw. schon wieder zahlreiche Stimmen gibt, die diese kritische Auseinandersetzung am liebsten sofort beenden würden.

    Sicher hat Victoria Kumar grundsätzlich recht, wenn sie auf die großen Potentiale digitaler Formate für historisches Lernen aufmerksam macht. Allerdings wissen wir fast nichts darüber, ob und inwieweit diese Potentiale auch realisiert werden. Christian Kuchler beispielsweise hat sich in seiner intensiv rezipierten Studie zum „Lernort Auschwitz“ diesbezüglich eher zurückhaltend geäußert.[4] Insofern wird es in Zukunft nicht nur auf die weitere Entwicklung digitaler Bildungsangebote ankommen, sondern auch und insbesondere auf ihre empirische Evaluation. Denn angesichts zunehmend heterogener Lernvoraussetzungen und sich rasant wandelnder politischer und geschichtskultureller Rahmenbedingungen ist historisches Lernen heute zweifelsohne wichtiger, aber wohl auch ungewisser als jemals zuvor.

    _____

    [1] Volkhard Knigge (Hg.): Jenseits der Erinnerung – Verbrechensgeschichte begreifen. Impulse für die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nationalsozialismus nach dem Ende der Zeitgenossenschaft. Göttingen 2022.
    [2] Jörn Rüsen: Lebendige Geschichte. Grundzüge einer Historik III: Formen und Funktionen des historischen Wissens. Göttingen 1989, S. 84.
    [3] Vgl. Holger Thünemann: Lernen aus der Geschichte? Überlegungen zur historischen Auseinandersetzung mit NS-Vergangenheit und Holocaust. In: Volkhard Knigge (Hg.): Jenseits der Erinnerung – Verbrechensgeschichte begreifen. Impulse für die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nationalsozialismus nach dem Ende der Zeitgenossenschaft. Göttingen 2022, S. 286-295, hier S. 289.
    [4] Christian Kuchler: Lernort Auschwitz. Geschichte und Rezeption schulischer Gedenkstättenfahrten 1980–2019. Göttingen 2021, S. 210-230.

  2. German version below. To all readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 22 languages. Just copy and paste.

    OPEN PEER REVIEW

    Authenticity Potentials

    For many years, people involved in memorial work have been discussing how the loss of the eyewitnesses can be compensated for, because with them, authenticity potential was exhausted several times over: in the “authentic” place, the persons as evidence of the Nazi crimes and in their stories. It was clear to everyone that there would be no substitute for the survivors, because they embodied, especially as guides with personalities, the authenticity of the history of persecution experienced by them and others. What remained was the place and the stories, insofar as they were documented.

    The project “IWalk ‘Mauthausen Memorial. Traces of a Crime'” described by Victoria Kumar is also based on interviews conducted by the USC Shoah Foundation worldwide in the 1990s. At that time, the idea of an application such as an “IWalk” was not yet foreseeable. In the production of these sources from the mid-1990s onwards, quite different intentions were in the foreground, first and foremost that the interviewees should recount their lives in the way that seemed important to themselves. The fact that most of the interviewees did not know the place (Mauthausen Memorial) themselves had many disadvantages, but also an advantage: the survivors sometimes felt compelled to describe the place in more detail in order to make it imaginable for the person asking the questions. Since the interviews of the USC Shoah Foundation are a mass source with almost 55,000 interviews, there are many opportunities to find passages in them that now allow us to establish references between the narratives and concrete places or objects. For the former concentration camp Mauthausen and its subcamps, the Mauthausen Survivors Documentation Project (MSDP) with 846 interviews conducted in 16 nations is also a good source. Side note: Based on previous experience with the interviewees of the USC Shoah Foundation, it was important for the MSDP to prepare the interviewees very precisely for the interviews and to give them an understanding of the topographical location of the Mauthausen memorial, i.e. to go there with them.

    The IWalk format has great potential that can still be exploited. Observations show that visitors especially look for people who bear their family name or for the place where they grew up or live. The digital memorial book for the dead of the Mauthausen concentration camp and its subcamps prepared by the Mauthausen concentration camp memorial site has done preliminary work that can be used. But that is still a vision for the future.

    For the time being, the way of communicating presented by Victoria Kumar helps visitors (of all ages) not only to perceive the place as authentic, including the changes through design, but also to “locate” the place in a differentiated way in concrete, comprehensible stories and thus open up a historical dimension that is important: history becomes, as Victoria Kumar writes, “personal, concrete and comprehensible”. Additionally: The strength of the format is that the statements can be deepened through the use of different sources in a preparatory and accompanying manner, thus contextualising individual stories. This allows a reflexive approach with the history of the place, one that leads out of the ahistorical projection trap that often threatens when only the narratives are followed.

    Making the inconspicuous – stone bench, gravestone, chimney – speak has a specific quality of the project presented by Victoria Kumar, as it can create an awareness of the ambiguity of a concrete authentic place: different situations and experiences in unexpected places of the memorial. It can also help to notice the topography, the relics, the interventions through designs, the non-texting/texting etc. and to develop a capacity for detaching from the overwhelmingness of the “whole” place per se and – even if most of them are not “made to speak” – replacing it with attention to details.

    In places like these, target audience orientation is associated with a high diversity of expectations. Reflecting on these as broadly as possible can help in the selection of offers. In Victoria Kumar’s text, similar projects in Vienna refer to the seemingly simple need to get to know a place and the scope for action, using the example of counter-resistance. What is currently difficult at both the Mauthausen concentration camp memorial and the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, and presumably at other concentration camp memorials, has to do with the reduction in the perception of “concentration camps” as murder machineries, especially for Jewish victims. The Mauthausen concentration camp system in particular was a multinational place where non-Jewish inmates were also murdered according to racist criteria – for example: (non-Jewish) victim groups from Eastern Europe had much higher death rates than those from Western Europe. Due to language barriers and complex (locally different) processes in the course of the war alone, it is challenging to include as many victim groups as possible in the commemoration work, but it is more important than ever. How this can be integrated into an IWalks format remains an open question, because manageability and clear structures sensibly force reduction and manageability. In this process, decisions obviously have to be made that will change over time, as the needs and thus the questions to the “authentic places of concentration camp memorials” will change. Austria has the advantage that with erinnern.at an experienced team can accompany this process of inclusive learning and teaching about Nazi crimes.

    __________

    Authentizitätspotenziale

    Seit vielen Jahren diskutierten Personen, die in der Gedenkstättenarbeit tätig sind, wie der Verlust der Zeitzeuginnen und Zeitzeugen kompensiert werden kann, denn mit ihnen wurde Authentizitätspotenzial mehrfach ausgeschöpft: an den „authentischen“ Ort, den Personen als Beweis für die NS-Verbrechen und an ihren Erzählungen. Es war allen klar, dass es keinen Ersatz für die Überlebenden geben wird, denn Sie verkörperten besonders als guides mit ihren Persönlichkeiten die Authentizität der von ihnen und anderen erfahrenen Verfolgungsgeschichte. Was blieb, sind der Ort und die Erzählungen, insofern sie dokumentiert wurden.

    Das von Victoria Kumar beschriebene Projekt „IWalk ‚Mauthausen Memorial: Spuren eines Verbrechens‘“ beruht auch auf Interviews der USC Shoah Foundation, die weltweit in den 1990er Jahren durchgeführt wurden. Damals war die Vorstellung einer Anwendung, wie die eines „IWalk“ noch nicht absehbar. Bei der Produktion der Quellen ab Mitte der 1990er Jahre standen ganz andere Intentionen im Vordergrund, allen voran, dass die Befragten ihr Leben so erzählen sollten, wie es ihnen selbst wichtig schien. Dass die meisten Fragenden den Ort (Gedenkstätte Mauthausen) selbst nicht kannten, hatte viele Nachteile, aber auch einen Vorteil: Die Überlebenden sahen sich manchmal gezwungen den Ort genauer zu beschreiben, um ihn für die fragende Person vorstellbar zu machen. Da es sich bei den Interviews der USC Shoah Foundation um eine Massenquelle mit nahezu 55.000 Interviews handelt, bieten sich viele Möglichkeiten, darin Passagen zu finden, die es nun erlauben, Bezüge zwischen den Erzählungen und konkreten Orten oder Objekten herzustellen. Für das ehemalige KZ-Mauthausen und dessen Außenlagern bietet sich außerdem das Mauthausen Survivors Documentation Project (MSDP) mit 846 in 16 Nationen geführten Interviews an. Nebenbemerkung: Auf Grund der Vorerfahrungen mit den Interviewenden der USC Shoah Foundation war es dem MSDP ein wichtiges Anliegen, die Interviewenden sehr genau für die Interviews vorzubereiten und ihnen ein Verständnis für topografische Lage der Gedenkstätte Mauthausen zu vermitteln, sprich, mit ihnen dorthin zu fahren.

    Das IWalk-Format hat ein großes Potenzial, das noch ausgeschöpft werden kann. Beobachtungen zeigen, dass Besuchende besonders nach Personen suchen, die ihren Familiennamen tragen oder nach dem Ort, in dem sie aufgewachsen sind oder leben. Das von der KZ-Gedenkstätte Mauthausen aufbereitete digitale Gedenkbuch für die Toten des KZ-Mauthausen und seiner Außenlager leistete dafür Vorarbeit, die genutzt werden kann. Doch das ist noch Zukunftsmusik.

    Vorerst hilft die von Victoria Kumar präsentierte Art der Vermittlung, dass Besuchende (aller Altersgruppen) nicht nur den Ort als authentischen wahrnehmen können, inklusive der Veränderungen durch Gestaltungen, sondern Besuchende den Ort in konkreten, nachvollziehbaren Geschichten differenziert „verorten“ und damit eine historische Dimension öffnen, die wichtig ist: Geschichte wird, so wie Victoria Kumar schreibt, damit „persönlich, konkret und nachvollziehbar.“ Zusätzlich: Die Stärke des Formats besteht darin, dass die Aussagen durch Verwendung unterschiedlicher  Quellen vorbereitend und begleitend vertieft werden können und damit individuelle Geschichten kontextualisiert werden. Das erlaubt einen reflexiven Zugang mit der Geschichte des Ortes, einen, der aus der ahistorischen Projektionsfalle führt, die oft droht, wenn nur den Erzählungen gefolgt wird.

    Das Unscheinbare – Steinbank, Grabstein, Rauchfang – zum Sprechen zu bringen hat eine spezifische Qualität des von Victoria Kumar vorgestellten Projektes, da dabei ein Bewusstsein geschaffen werden kann für die Vieldeutigkeit eines konkreten authentischen Ortes: unterschiedliche Situationen und Erfahrungen an unerwarteten Stellen der Gedenkstätte. Es kann auch dabei helfen, die Topografie, die Relikte, die Interventionen durch Gestaltungen, die Nicht-/Betextung usw. wahrzunehmen und eine Fähigkeit dafür zu entwickeln, sich von der Überwältigung des „ganzen“ Ortes an sich zu lösen und – wenn auch die meisten nicht „zum Sprechen“ gebracht werden – durch die Aufmerksamkeit für Details zu ersetzen.

    Zielpublikumsorientierung ist an Orten wie diesen mit hoher Diversität an Erwartungshaltungen verbunden. Diese möglichst breit zu reflektieren, kann bei der Auswahl von Angeboten helfen. Im Text von Victoria Kumar wird bei ähnlichen Projekten in Wien auf das nur scheinbar simple Bedürfnis des Kennenlernens eines Ortes, die Handlungsspielräume am Beispiel der Gegenwehr verwiesen. Was sowohl bei der KZ-Gedenkstätte Mauthausen als auch beim Staatlichen Museum Auschwitz-Birkenau, und vermutlich bei anderen KZ-Gedenkstätten, aktuell schwierig ist, hat mit der Reduktion in der Wahrnehmung von „KZs“ als Mordmaschinerien vor allem für jüdische Opfer zu tun. Gerade das KZ-System Mauthausen war ein multinationaler Ort, an dem auch bei nichtjüdischen Inhaftierten nach rassistischen Kriterien ermordet wurde – zB.: (nichtjüdische) Opfergruppen aus Osteuropa hatten viel höhere Todesraten als jene aus dem Westen Europas. Eine möglichst alle Opfergruppen miteinbeziehende Erinnerungsarbeit ist alleine auf Grund der Sprachbarrieren und komplexer (lokal unterschiedlicher) Vorgänge im Kriegsverlauf herausfordernd, aber wichtiger denn je. Wie sich dies in ein Format von IWalks integrieren lässt, bleibt offen, denn Überschaubarkeit und klare Strukturen zwingen sinnvollerweise zu Reduktion und Überschaubarkeit. In diesem Prozess müssen offensichtlich Entscheidungen getroffen werden, die sich im Zeitverlauf verändern werden, da sich die Bedürfnisse und damit die Fragen an die „authentischen Orte von KZ-Gedenkstätten“ ändern werden. Österreich hat den Vorteil, dass mit erinnern.at ein erfahrenes Team diesen Prozess des inklusiv angedachten Lernens und Lehrens über die NS-Verbrechen begleiten kann.

  3. To all readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 22 languages. Just copy and paste.

    Erweiterung des historischen Originalschauplatzes mit IWalk und TikTok

    Besten Dank an Victoria Kumar für die interessante und verständliche Beschreibung der Mauthausen IWalk-App. Besonders wichtig scheint mir der Hinweis, dass der IWalk «Mauthausen Memorial. Spuren eines Verbrechens» eine Ergänzung zum bereits bestehenden Bildungsangebot der KZ-Gedenkstätte darstellt respektive für bereits vertraute Besuchende eine Möglichkeit ist, «neue Geschichten oder unbekannte Orte an der Gedenkstätte zu erkunden». Der IWalk ersetzt also keine begleiteten Rundgänge in der KZ-Gedenkstätte oder schulischen Unterricht, sondern ist ein digitales Zusatzangebot, das sowohl am historischen Originalschauplatz als auch im digitalen Raum überall auf der Welt genutzt werden kann. Darauf wird auch in der «Bewerbung» des IWalks auf der Homepage der KZ-Gedenkstätte Mauthausen hingewiesen.

    Dieser Umstand macht auf zwei bedeutsame Punkte aufmerksam: Erstens passt nicht jedes Lernangebot für alle Gruppen von Lernenden. Eine erweiterte Palette an Bildungsangeboten erhöht demnach die Chance, mehr Nutzer:innen anzusprechen. Und zweitens nutzen Vermittlungsinstitutionen von historischen Originalschauplätzen ihr grosses Bildungspotenzial erst, wenn sie auch den digitalen Raum «bespielen». So produziert die Erstellerin eines im Artikel besprochenen IWalks, Marlene Wöckinger, in ihrer Funktion als Teil des Vermittler:innenteams der Gedenkstätte Mauthausen auch kurze Informationsvideos für TikTok. Das Videoportal und soziale Netzwerk TikTok, betrieben vom chinesischen Unternehmen ByteDance, erreicht monatlich rund eine Milliarde Menschen, in Europa wohl bis zu 100 Millionen.[1] Offenbar sind nur ungefähr 7% der TikTok-Nutzer:innen über 35 Jahre alt sind. Der Grossteil der Nutzer:innen ist zwischen 18-24 Jahre alt.[2] Mit den Kurzvideos will das Vermittler:innenteam den (meist jugendlichen) Nutzer:innen von TikTok Denkanstösse geben, um anschliessend im digitalen Raum in einen intensiven persönlichen Dialog mit Menschen zu treten.[3] In den englisch gesprochenen Videos, welche ungefähr eine Minute dauern, werden beispielsweise die Wohnsituation in den überfüllten Baracken oder die Aufgaben der SS-Wächter am historischen Originalschauplatz genauer erläutert. Das Team hinter dem TikTok-Account «mauthausenmemorial» versucht, über im Video aufgeworfene Fragen einen Meinungsaustausch anzustossen und mithilfe der Kommentarfunktion auf die Eindrücke, Fragen und Irritationen der Zuschauer:innen einzugehen.

    Die Kurzvideobeiträge der KZ-Gedenkstätte Mauthausen stehen in Verbindung mit der „TikTok – Shoah Education and Commemoration Initiative”, welche durch quantitative und qualitative Forschung der Hebrew University of Jerusalem begleitet wird. Ziel dieses Projektes ist es, Gedenkstätten und Museen zu ermutigen, TikTok in die eigene Gedenk- und Bildungsarbeit zu integrieren und dadurch neuen Zielgruppen Wissen zu vermitteln.

    Gleichzeitig richtet sich die Initiative vor dem Hintergrund des weit verbreiteten Problems der Shoah-Relativierung- und -Leugnung, sowohl off- als auch online, gegen die Verbreitung ebensolcher Inhalte auf der Kurzvideoplattform TikTok[4]. Im Hinblick auf das erst vor kurzem veröffentlichte «Lagebild Antisemitismus 2020/21» des deutschen Bundesamts für Verfassungsschutz wird klar, dass dieses Ziel der Initiative unbedingt intensiv verfolgt werden muss. Im Schlusskapitel des Lagebildes wird dies deutlich, da «die sich stetig verändernden und erweiternden technischen Möglichkeiten des Internets beziehungsweise der dort verfügbaren Kommunikationsmittel und -wege (…) einen wesentlichen Dynamisierungsfaktor im aktuellen Antisemitismus»[5] darstellen.

    Die digitale Präsenz von Gedenkstätten, beispielsweise auf TikTok, und zusätzliche digitale Bildungsangebote, wie der beschriebene IWalk, bieten Möglichkeiten, gerade Jugendliche und junge Erwachsene zu bilden und damit einhergehend auch für Antisemitismus zu sensibilisieren.

    _____

    [1] Michael Thaidigsmann, «Der Holocaust auf TikTok,» Jüdische Allgemeine, January 26, 2022, https://www.juedische-allgemeine.de/kultur/der-holocaust-auf-tiktok/ (letztmals aufgerufen am 23.4.2022).
    [2] «Anteil der TikTok Nutzer nach Altersgruppen und Geschlecht weltweit im Jahr 2021,» HypeAuditor, zitiert nach de.statista.com: https://de.statista.com/statistik/daten/studie/1247328/umfrage/anteil-der-tiktok-nutzer-nach-altersgruppen-und-geschlecht-weltweit/ (letztmals aufgerufen am 23.4.2022).
    [3] Michael Thaidigsmann, «Der Holocaust auf TikTok,» Jüdische Allgemeine, January 26, 2022, https://www.juedische-allgemeine.de/kultur/der-holocaust-auf-tiktok/.
    [4] «Presentation of “TikTok – Shoah Education and Commemoration Initiative”,» American Jewish Committee: https://www.ajc.org/news/presentation-of-tiktok-shoah-education-and-commemoration-initiative (letztmals aufgerufen am 23.4.2022).
    [5] «Lagebild Antisemitismus 2020/21,» Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz: https://www.verfassungsschutz.de/SharedDocs/publikationen/DE/allgemein/2022-04-lagebild-antisemitismus.pdf?__blob=publicationFile&v=3.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest